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AAGP 2015 Annual Meeting registration and AAGP conference rate at hotel close Friday, Feb. 27
AAGP
Have your hotel reservations? Time is running out. The AAGP conference rate expires on Feb. 27. Book your room now.

You’re registered, right? Pre-registration for AAGP 2015 also closes on Friday, Feb. 27. If you're not registered, please visit the annual meeting website to sign up.

If you haven't already, check out our intensive pre-conference workshops on Friday, March 27:

AAGP 2015 Review in Geriatric Psychiatry

Neuroscience Teaching Day: Neuroplasticity, Memory and Aging

And the 2015 Training Directors Workshop.

Even if you've registered for the meeting, it's not too late to sign up for one of the workshops. Visit www.aagpmeeting.org to register!

See you in New Orleans!
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AAGP 2015 Board of Directors Election Results
AAGP
The AAGP Board of Directors congratulates the newly elected 2015-2016 AAGP Board Members. Elections closed on Dec. 29, 2014. New board members will begin their terms at the 2015 Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana, March 27-30, 2015.

President-Elect
Dan Sewell, MD
University of California San Diego Medical Center
San Diego, California

Secretary/Treasurer-Elect
Brent Forester, MD
McLean Hospital & Harvard Medical School
Boston, Massachusetts

At-Large Psychiatrist Board Members
Susan Lehmann, MD
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, Maryland

Ipsit Vahia, MD
University of California San Diego Health System
UCSD Stein Institute for Research on Aging
San Diego & La Jolla, California

Non-Psychiatrist Board Member
Julie Dumas, PhD

University of Vermont College of Medicine
Burlington, Vermont

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IN THE NEWS


Treatments to stop Alzheimer's step closer as scientists discover key inhibitor molecule
Medical News Today
Scientists have discovered a molecule that can interrupt an important stage in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The molecule sticks to faulty proteins and stops them forming toxic clusters in the brain.
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Epigenomics of Alzheimer's disease progression
MIT News
Our susceptibility to disease depends both on the genes that we inherit from our parents and on our lifetime experiences. These two components — nature and nurture — seem to affect very different processes in the context of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the journal Nature.
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Why 'Still Alice' is about you
CNN
Julianne Moore won an Academy Award for her heart-wrenching performance in "Still Alice," in which she plays a linguistics professor with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Much has been written about her characterization of a woman struggling with the disease. But there's another reason the performance hits home for millions of Americans, whether they are grappling with Alzheimer's or not. Richard Glatzer, who co-directed the film with Wash Westmoreland, names it: "Still Alice," he says, is actually a film about "the real unsung heroes: caregivers."
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Ultrasound used to reverse the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease
Geek
As the world's population continues to age, the problem of dementia increases. These brain diseases see people slowly lose the ability to think, remember and inevitably they become unable to look after themselves. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia suffered by the elderly (around 70 percent of cases), and scientists have just made a big breakthrough in managing to reverse the symptoms using ultrasound.
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Diabetes, depression linked to higher risk of dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment
News Medical
People with mild cognitive impairment are at higher risk of developing dementia if they have diabetes or psychiatric symptoms such as depression, finds a new review led by UCL researchers. Mild cognitive impairment is a state between normal aging and dementia, where someone's mind is functioning less well than would be expected for their age. It affects 19 percent of people aged 65 and over, and around 46 percent of people with MCI develop dementia within 3 years compared with 3 percent of the general population.
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Amyloid seeding may link Alzheimer's, diabetes
MedPage Today
Patients with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for developing Alzheimer's disease, and now researchers in Sweden may have discovered the molecular link that explains the association. The research focused on amyloidosis — the process by which misfolded amyloid proteins form insoluble fibril deposits — which occurs in a host of diseases, including type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's.
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Preparing foods at high temperatures might increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's News Today
A recent study found that preparing foods at high temperatures might increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease. The results were published in the current issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. The research team from The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai examined studies that assessed the content AGEs (advanced glycation end products) in diets and compared the total AGE's with rates of Alzheimer's disease.
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Early-onset Alzheimer's takes toll on patients, their children
The Boston Globe
Early-onset Alzheimer’s is particularly cruel. The disease strikes some in their prime, when careers are at their height and the rewards of a lifetime's work at last seem within grasp. It destroys memories and the ability to learn, then wipes away most of one’s identity, leading eventually to death.
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AAGP eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Esther Cho, Content Editor, 469.420.2671  

Christopher Wood, AAGP, 703.556.9222, x142;
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