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MOC Part IV Feedback Module optional as of 2016
AAGP
The ABPN Board of Directors has decided to make the Feedback Module an OPTIONAL component of Part IV in its MOC Program. As of Jan. 1, 2016, the Feedback Module (patient or peer surveys) will become a highly recommended yet optional component for all ABPN diplomates enrolled in Maintenance of Certification. The Part IV Clinical Module component (chart review) will remain a requirement, with additional approved activities now available on our website. This change is in compliance with current MOC Standards as mandated by the American Board of Medical Specialties.
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Joint NIA-AGS Conference on sleep: Application now available
AAGP
"Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Aging: New Avenues for Improving Brain Health, Physical Health, and Functioning" — the second in a three-part series of U13 Bedside-to-Bench Conferences — will be held Oct. 4-6 in Bethesda, Maryland. Sponsored by the National Institute on Aging and the American Geriatrics Society, the conference will provide attendees across multiple disciplines with opportunities to learn about cutting-edge research, participate in creating recommendations for future research, and network with colleagues and leaders in the field. Click here for more information, and make sure to submit your application by June 1.
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IN THE NEWS


Study shows non-memory Alzheimer's symptoms more likely in younger people
Medical Xpress
New research has shown that people with Alzheimer's may not always experience memory loss as their first symptom of the disease, with younger people more likely to have problems with judgement, language or visual and spatial awareness than older people. The study of 7,815 people – one of the largest of its kind to date – suggests a need for greater awareness of the different symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia.
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Genentech brain trust leaves with $217 million for new startup to fight Alzheimer's and Parkinson's
Forbes
Three former top researchers at Genentech, the legendary biotech that is now part of Roche Holding, have raised $217 million in venture capital to start a new company, Denali Therapeutics, focused on treating and curing neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, ALS and Parkinson's. The news is another sign of both the large amounts of money available to all biotechnology startups and for a financial turnaround for research efforts against brain diseases that have been tough to beat.
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Your plate may hold the key to Alzheimer's
WebMD
Healthy eating can help you stay at an ideal weight and stave off diabetes and heart disease. Now, there's more and more evidence that a heart-healthy diet is also a brain-healthy diet — and it may even prevent or slow dementia, which includes Alzheimer's disease.
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Pot pill doesn't lessen dementia symptoms
MedPage Today
A low-dose "pot pill" wasn't effective at mitigating symptoms of dementia, researchers reported. In a randomized controlled trial, patients who were taking either placebo or oral tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, Namisol) had similar reductions in neuropsychiatric symptoms, reported Geke van den Elsen, M.D., of Radboud University Medical Center in Nijmegen, and colleagues.
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White matter differences identified in early-stage Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia
Alzheimer's News Today
Findings from a study recently conducted by neuropsychologist Christiane Möller as part of her doctoral work showed that patients with Alzheimer's disease as well as behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia have large differences in their brains' white matter. For her research, which is funded by the NWO's National Initiative Brain & Cognition, she used advanced image analysis techniques on MRI brain scans from early-stage dementia patients.
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A game that explores the effects of Alzheimer's Disease
Engadget
You're standing in a living room. It might be your living room. Something's not quite right — for every object you recognize, there's another you don't. Normally, if you get this feeling while playing a video game, you're in the middle of a horror, awaiting the inevitable jump scare. In Forget-Me-Knot, however, you aren't evading an enemy, but instead trying to piece together memories of a life that, thanks to Alzheimer's disease, you barely remember.
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Improving dementia care requires a change in mindset
PBS NewsHour
Dementia is a symptom or set of symptoms. It is not an actual disease, but a term used to describe a group of brain disorders that causes a loss in cognitive abilities such as memory, language, abstract reasoning, and judgment, to name a few. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. Since the term "brain disorder" is used in the definition of dementia, most people are very confused about how to help people with the condition. Some even become intimidated by the definition, furthering their negative reaction to the person diagnosed.
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Could high blood sugar be a cause of Alzheimer's disease?
Medical News Today
While nobody knows exactly what causes the complex brain changes that lead to Alzheimer's disease, scientists suspect one of the drivers is the accumulation of plaques of a faulty protein called beta-amyloid. Now, a new study of mice shows how too much sugar in the blood can speed up the production of the protein.
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Antidepressant use on the rise among patients with dementia
MedPage Today
The use of sedative antidepressants such as tricyclics, mirtazapine and trazodone rose significantly over 10 years among patients with dementia in long-term care in the Canadian province of Ontario, researchers said here. Over the same time, the use of benzodiazapines fell sharply, while prescriptions for atypical antipsychotics decreased slightly, according to Akshya Vasudev, M.D., of Western University in London, Ontario and colleagues.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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