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Congratulations to AAGP Members Devanand and Vahia, APA Awardees!
AAGP
Devangere P. Devanand, MD, was named this year's winner of the American Psychiatric Association's Jack Weinberg Memorial Award for Geriatric Psychiatry. Established in 1983 in memory of Jack Weinberg, MD, this award honors a psychiatrist who, over the course of his/her career, has demonstrated special leadership or who has done outstanding work in clinical practice, training or research into geriatric psychiatry. Devanand is director of the Division of Geriatric Psychiatry and professor of psychiatry and neurology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University. He is also co-director of the Memory Disorders Center and co-director of the Late Life Depression Clinic, at the New York State Psychiatric Institute.

Ipsit V. Vahia, MD, was presented APA's Hartford-Jeste Award for Future Leaders in Geriatric Psychiatry. This award recognizes an early career geriatric psychiatrist who has made noteworthy contributions to the field of geriatric psychiatry through excellence in research, teaching, clinical practice and community service, and has demonstrated the potential to develop into a future leader in the field. Vahia is an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego, and director of research at UCSD Senior Behavioral Health.
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AAGP participates in APA's Council of Geriatric Psychiatry
AAGP President-Elect Gary Small, MD, represented the organization at the American Psychiatric Association's Council of Geriatric Psychiatry, which met at the APA Annual Meeting in New York City on May 5, 2014. The Council, chaired by Robert Paul Roca, MD, discussed the use of antipsychotic medications for the treatment of behavioral disturbances in persons with dementia, and Victor Reus, MD, reported on the progress of practice guidelines for such use. Other topics included APA's efforts regarding integrated care, an APA Assembly Action Paper for "Guidelines for Caregivers," and the APA's geriatric awards. Small reported on the AAGP 2014 Annual Meeting and encouraged Council members to attend the March 2015 meeting in New Orleans. The national challenge in recruiting new geriatric psychiatrists to the field was discussed, including strategies to streamline training by offering the option of beginning specialty training in the PGY-5 year.
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AAGP reaches out to trainees at APA


AAGP sponsors a brown bag lunch at the APA 2014 Annual Meeting

















By Isis Burgos-Chapman, MD, AAGP MIT Board Member

Recently a few AAGP members and I had the pleasure of spending time with medical students and psychiatry residents at the annual APA conference in New York City. Brent Forester, MD, and I attended the PsychSIGN Sub-Specialties dinner in which we met with medical students ranging from their first through fourth year of training. I was later joined by Nery Diaz, DO (geriatric psychiatry fellow at Yale) and Laura Marrone, MD (PGY-4 at UCSD) at the AAGP-sponsored brown bag lunch on May 7, where we met with another group of students and residents wishing to learn more about opportunities available within the field of geriatric psychiatry.

Despite differences in levels of training, these trainees all seemed to share many of the same misconceptions about the field of geriatric psychiatry. Many thought that geriatric psychiatrists only deal with dementia care and that you need to be a certain age in order to care for elderly patients. This experience made me realize that now more than ever we need get out there and talk to trainees at all levels and colleagues in other specialties to educate them about what it is that we do as geriatric psychiatrists. We need to work together to help dispel the stigmas and false impressions that have surrounded our field.

It is our responsibility to embrace the role of mentor and to guide medical students and junior residents alike as they embark on the acquisition of professional skills and knowledge. While we may not always recognize the impact we have on those in training or be identified as a formal mentor, we can help to instill confidence and wisdom in those we work with by fulfilling the roles of listener, aide and colleague. Ultimately our goal should be to work collectively to illustrate to the public at large the numerous joys and benefits of working in the care of older adults.

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AAGP presents hot topics at APA Annual Meeting
On May 3, the opening day of the APA Annual Meeting, AAGP sponsored a well-attended session titled "Hot Topics in Geriatric Psychiatry," which provided important clinical and research updates in late-life depression, dementia and schizophrenia. The faculty was comprised of Carl Cohen, MD; AAGP Past President David C. Steffens, MD; and Secretary-Treasurer Melinda S. Lantz, MD. Steffens, who chaired the session, commented, "Attendees appreciated the variety of presentation formats, including scholarly review, new research, case-based learning, and interaction with the audience."
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Session proposals for AAGP's 2015 Annual Meeting in New Orleans due by June 15
AAGP is accepting proposals for the 2015 Annual Meeting to be held March 27-30 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The theme of the meeting is "Interprofessional Practice: Working Together to Meet the Mental Health Needs of Older Adults." The meeting will focus on:
  • Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, and behavioral issues
  • Late-life depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety
  • Nonpharmacologic and alternative treatment options
  • Multidisciplinary care
  • Substance abuse/misuse and aging
  • Cultural competence for a diverse older population
  • Integrated models of care and other policy initiatives impacting the field and patients
  • And much more
Be an important part of this interdisciplinary educational event and submit your proposals for sessions, clinical case study presentations, and posters. Learn More and Submit Abstracts: www.AAGPonline.org/2015CFP.

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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Preventing Alzheimer's disease — with an antidepressant
Los Angeles Times
Citalopram, an antidepressant better known by its commercial name Celexa, has a remarkable side effect, a new study has found.

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Researchers discover gene variant that makes brains resilient against Alzheimer's disease
Nature World News
Researchers have found a potential gene variant that helps certain people cope with Alzheimer's disease.

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Young blood: Stanford researchers hope plasma injections from the young rejuvenate Alzheimer's patients
San Francisco Business Times
What if a few shots of a young person's plasma could halt Alzheimer’s disease in an older person? How beautifully simple.

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Welcome, new AAGP members!
PSYCHIATRIST MEMBERS
  • Alireza Atri, MD, PhD, Bedford, MA
  • Robert Chalfant, MD, Nashville, TN
  • Michael Glasser, MD, Bethesda, MD
  • Edulfo Gonzalez, MD, San Antonio, TX
  • Chris Hope, MD, Bridgenorth, Ontario, Canada
  • Ihuoma Ndubisi, MD, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
  • William Anthony Price, MD, Canfield, OH
  • Catharina Van Tuijl, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • David Nelson Vigor, MD, Haslett, MI
  • Diane Washington, MD, Bolingbrook, IL
MEMBERS-IN-TRAINING
  • Noreen Flanagan, MD, Scarborough, ME
  • Eric Schindler, MD, Lebanon, NH
MEMBERS
  • Diane Ammerman, PharmD, Cranberry Twp, PA
  • Caroline R. Wood, MS, Mankato, MN
STUDENT MEMBERS
  • Humberto Beltran, El Paso, TX
  • Stephanie Hrisko, BS, BS, MA, Columbia, SC
  • Daniel Naranjo, MD, Miami, FL
  • Janet Taylor, BA, MS, Attalla, AL

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Free online sessions from the AAGP 2014 Annual Meeting
Access two sessions from the AAGP 2014 Annual Meeting and earn continuing medical education credits.

Neurocognitive Disorders, the DSM-5, and Informed Treatment Choices
  • View Symposium Archive: www.neurosciencecme.com/CM888 (Credit Expiration Date: Wednesday, May 6, 2015)
  • CME Credit (Physicians): The American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry (AAGP) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • The American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry (AAGP) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
Late-Life Depression: More Than a Mood Disorder
  • View Symposium Archive: www.neurosciencecme.com/CM889 (Credit Expiration Date: Wednesday, May 6, 2015)
  • CME Credit (Physicians): The American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry (AAGP) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • The American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry (AAGP) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

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Health professionals caught up in tax fraud scheme
A number of recent news reports have come out of several regions of the country about physicians who have been the latest victims of tax refund identify fraud during this year's tax filing period. The Internal Revenue Services (IRS) has seen a significant increase in refund fraud that involves thieves who file false tax returns by stealing and using an individual’s Social Security number. When the individual attempts to file his or her own legitimate tax return, it gets rejected because the thieves have already filed and collected on the false return. This year's scam has ensnared hundreds of physicians and other health care professionals across the country. In addition to the IRS, the Secret Service is leading an investigation of this year’s tax refund identity fraud. The American Medical Association (AMA) is working with Federal officials who are investigating this tax fraud scheme.

Physicians who are victims of this scam should have received a 5071C letter from the IRS with instructions to contact the IRS identity theft website. Physicians can also call the IRS at 1-800-830-5084 to inform agency officials that they did not file the return referred to in the IRS letter. If a physician did not receive a 5071C letter or has already received confirmation that their legitimate tax return was accepted, it is unlikely that he or she is a victim of this scam. Physicians who are victims will need to file a paper return if they have not already done so, and should attach a Form 14039 Identity Theft Affidavit to explain what happened. In addition, copies of any notices on this issue received from the IRS, such as the 5071C letter, should be attached.

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New ICD-10 implementation date set for Oct. 1, 2015
On May 1, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that the new implementation date for the ICD-10 family of diagnostic and procedural codes will be Oct. 1, 2015. The previous compliance deadline was Oct. 1, 2014; however, Congress delayed that in passing the temporary "doc fix" measure. On April 14, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 was enacted, which contained a provision that stated that "the Secretary may not adopt ICD-10 prior to Oct. 1, 2015."
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President proclaims May as National Mental Health Awareness Month and Older Americans Month
On May 1, as has been done in recent years, President Barack Obama issued a proclamation declaring May as National Mental Health Awareness Month. Representative Grace Napolitano, D-California, co-chair of the Congressional Mental Health Caucus, submitted the request to the White House.

The President's proclamation stated, "Despite great strides in our understanding of mental illness and vast improvements in the dialogue surrounding it, too many still suffer in silence. Tens of millions of Americans face mental health conditions like depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or post-traumatic stress disorder. During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we reaffirm our commitment to building our understanding of mental illness, increasing access to treatment, and ensuring those who are struggling to know they are not alone."

On April 30, President Obama issued a proclamation stating that May 2014 is Older Americans Month. In that statement, the President said, “During Older Americans Month, we pay tribute to our parents, grandparents, friends, neighbors, and every senior near to our hearts. We strive to build a bright future on the strong foundation they have laid.”

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7th Annual Chair Summit: Master Class for Neuroscience Professional Development
The Chair Summit: Master Class for Neuroscience Professional Development will be held Sept. 11-13, 2014, at the Westin Tampa Harbour Island in Tampa, Florida. Session topics include depression, bipolar disorder, traumatic brain injury, pain management, cognitive dysfunction and much more. Learn more and register at www.chairsummit.com.
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IN THE NEWS


How your idle computer can help fight Alzheimer's disease
CIO
You might remember the SETI@Home project, as part of which people downloaded a software application that helped astronomers crunch data as they searched for signs of extraterrestrial life. Now there's a somewhat similar project that's much closer to home. It's called Compute Against Alzheimer's Disease, and it's a way that home computer users can make a contribution to the fight against one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Researchers at George Mason University created the Computer Against Alzheimer's Disease app, which only runs when the host computer is idle.
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Preventing Alzheimer's disease — with an antidepressant
Los Angeles Times
Citalopram, an antidepressant better known by its commercial name Celexa, has a remarkable side effect, a new study has found: In both mice bred to develop Alzheimer's disease and in healthy human volunteers, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, or SSRI, drives down the production of a protein called beta-amyloid, which in the brains of those with Alzheimer's clumps together in sticky plaques and is thought to short-circuit the brain's wiring.
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The hidden type of Alzheimer's doctors miss
Fox News
The claim: Roughly 1 out of 10 Alzheimer's patients — particularly men — may suffer from a subtype of the disease called hippocampal sparing Alzheimer's. As the name suggests, this form of the disease spares the patient's hippocampus, or memory center. But it can cause angry outbursts, vision problems, and other bizarre behavior that often leads to wrong diagnoses and incorrect treatment, according to Mayo Clinic researchers.
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Singular gene could increase brain power and fight off dementia
The Huffington Post
The key to fighting off aging and cognitive decline doesn't necessarily come in a pill or a bottle. Instead, researchers say, the key may be a longevity gene that could fight off those "senior moments" and more serious diseases like dementia. A study funded partly by the National Institutes of Health says the KLOTHO gene is responsible for improved thinking, learning and memory processes. The study, published in the journal Cell Reports, used genetically engineered mice with higher-than-normal levels of the gene and discovered those mice had better memory recall.
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