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Editorship of the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
AAGP
The AAGP is proud of its flagship journal, the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (AJGP). The AJGP made its debut in 1993 under the visionary leadership of the late Gene D. Cohen, MD PhD, Professor of Psychiatry at Georgetown University, first chief of the Center on Aging and Director of the Program on Aging at the NIMH and former Acting Director of the NIA. Dr. Cohen was renowned for his work on creativity and development of award-winning intergenerational games. Through Dr. Cohen's tireless efforts, the AJGP grew in its nascent years as a quarterly edition, and became a part of the Index Medicus in 1996.
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Support the AAGP Scholars Fund
Donating to the Scholars Fund of the Geriatric Mental Health Foundation is a perfect and easy way to help grow the field of geriatric psychiatry. Contributions to the fund will be used for the 2015 Scholars Program, which will bring trainees to the AAGP Annual Meeting in New Orleans for programming designed specifically for them, to introduce the rewards and diversity of the field. In its five years, the Scholars Program has hosted more than 100 trainees and provided year-long mentorship. In its first year, 2010, the Fund was able to provide benefits for 26 trainees; this year 41 trainees received benefits.

The Scholars Fund of the Geriatric Mental Health Foundation now has more than $23,000 raised for the 2015 Scholars Program. Donations have already come in for five named scholarships, each at $2500. Please keep up this great momentum and donate today! Help us raise $100,000 for the 2015 program!

Donations are due Sept. 30 for the 2015 Scholars Program. Donate online at www.aagponline.org/donateScholars. Participants of group donations can indicate their group on the online form in the "group" field.

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IN THE NEWS


Dementia risk increased for obese people in 30s, but reduced for obese seniors
Medical News Today
It is well established that obesity can increase the risk of diabetes, high blood pressure and even cancer. Now, a new study finds that it may also increase the risk of dementia for those who are obese in early to mid-life. But for elderly individuals, obesity may actually have a protective effect against the condition.
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Study: Pomegranate compound could delay Alzheimer's
TIME
There's a chemical compound in pomegranate fruits called punicalagin, which researchers at University of Huddersfield, an institution known for food science, believe could help slow the progression of diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's by treating inflammation in the brain. For two years, Dr. Olumayokun Olajide has lead of team of researchers in studying the effects of the compound on rats, and in new research, published in the journal Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, the researchers showed that the compound was able to inhibit some inflammation in the brain.
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  Hiring Inpatient Director in Nashville
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How to address dementia in the workplace
Inside Counsel
The growing occurrence of dementia is morphing from a healthcare issue into a workplace challenge. While an estimated 5 million Americans currently suffer from dementia, that number is expected to increase to at least 14 million by 2040. Compounding the problem, dementia has a disproportionate impact on women as compared to men. Women are twice as likely to develop the disease, and substantially more women provide care to dementia patients. Thus, as the rate of dementia increases, employers will face increasingly complex issues in dealing with employees who are affected by it either as patients or caregivers.
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Alzheimer's disease: Are we close to finding a cure?
Medical News Today
At Medical News Today, hardly a day goes by without coming across a study about Alzheimer's disease. There is no doubt that scientists across the world are working hard to find ways to prevent, treat and cure this debilitating condition, which affects almost 36 million people globally. But are they making any progress? We investigate.
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Latest Alzheimer's research shows it's time to get moving
By Denise A. Valenti
Move it, use it, and you are less likely to lose it. Physical activity — even in small amounts — is a factor in slowing the process of the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. This has been found to hold true even for those genetically at risk for Alzheimer's disease. Exercise was a prominent topic during the Alzheimer's Association International Conference held recently in Copenhagen, Denmark. The AAIC brings together top researchers in the field of dementia in order to engage a multidisciplinary international exchange of ideas.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Study: Pomegranate compound could delay Alzheimer's
TIME
There's a chemical compound in pomegranate fruits called punicalagin, which researchers at University of Huddersfield, an institution known for food science, believe could help slow the progression of diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's by treating inflammation in the brain.

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Link between vitamin D and dementia risk confirmed
University of Exeter
Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a substantially increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in older people, according to the most robust study of its kind ever conducted.

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AAGP leader Stephen Bartels advocates for attention to older adults From SAMHSA
The New England Journal of Medicine
Steve Bartels represented the AAGP at an expert panel convened by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) (SAMHSA) on July 8-9 discussing outreach and engagement for persons with serious mental illness.

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New mouse model to open door to research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's
News Medical
University of Utah scientists have developed a genetically engineered line of mice that is expected to open the door to new research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's and other diseases. The mice carry a protein marker, which changes in degree of fluorescence in response to different calcium levels. This will allow many cell types, including cells called astrocytes and microglia, to be studied in a new way.
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Study: Tactic in Alzheimer's fight may be safe
The New York Times
The 40-year-old man showed up in Dr. Mary Malloy's clinic with sadly disfiguring symptoms. His hands, elbows, ears and feet were blemished with protruding pustules and tuber-like welts, some so painful it was hard for him to walk. He suffered from a rare genetic condition called dysbetalipoproteinemia, which caused his cholesterol levels to soar so high that pools of fatty tissue seemed to bubble up under his skin. But there was something else about this patient. He was missing a gene that, when present in one form, greatly increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.
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AAGP eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Esther Cho, Content Editor, 469.420.2671  

Christopher Wood, AAGP, 703.556.9222, x142;
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