This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Oct. 22, 2013

Home   About   Membership   Education & Resources   Publications   AASPA APP   Contact Us



 

How good are the best surgeons? A new study shows that your surgeon's skill really matters
Forbes
Someone finally figured out how to rate surgeons. Don’t expect to see a ranking list any time soon, though, the ranking technique was only used for a very small group of specialized surgeons. But boy, does it work well. The New England Journal of Medicine reported last week on a remarkable new study, by John Birkmeyer and colleagues at the University of Michigan.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Misleading marketing helps rise of robotic surgery
Chicago Tribune
Last year, Denver's Porter Adventist Hospital announced that Warren Kortz, a general surgeon on staff, was the first in the Rocky Mountain region to use a technique known as robotic surgery to remove gall bladders through one incision in the belly button. The operation, performed while the doctor sits at a videogame-like console, was "taking advantage of another breakthrough in robotic surgery" and is "easier on the patient," the hospital said in a press release.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


3-D images generated from PET/CT scans help surgeons envision tumors
Medical Xpress
Researchers at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia have developed a hologram-like display of a patient's organs that surgeons can use to plan surgery. This approach uses molecular PET/CT images of a patient to rapidly create a 3-D image of that patient, so that surgeons can see the detailed anatomical structure, peel away layers of tissue, and move around in space to see all sides of a tumor, before entering the operating room to excise it.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Tightening the screws on radical spine surgeries: Patients are looking for a better way
Newsday
Kimberly Chatlos broke her spine carrying her sick mother from bed. She suffered an excruciating amount of pain and turned to Atlantic Spine Center for help. With the advancements in technology and the extreme precision of endoscopy surgery performed by the qualified doctors at Atlantic Spine Center, same day fusion surgery has become a popular alternative to traditional open fusion surgery. It was the relief Chatlos had been seeking for a very long time.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Google Glass in the OR: There's an app for that, but would you trust it with your spleen?
Venture Beat
Remote healthcare has long been one of the most exciting promises of the Google Glass platform, and today at DEMO, we got a taste of how that would actually work. Pristine EyeSight and Pristing CheckLists from startup Pristine are two new applications designed for surgery, anesthesia, and telemedicine in general.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Robot surgery damaging patients rises with marketing
Bloomberg
Robot operations haven’t been proven in randomized trials to offer significant health benefits compared to standard, less-invasive surgery and multiple studies show they can cost thousands of dollars more. U.S. hospitals used robot-assisted surgery in more than 350,000 operations last year, a 60 percent jump since 2010. Robotic surgery is used to perform hysterectomies...

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
iPad app helps surgeons in the operating room, gives digital overlays of key blood vessels
MedCity News
As augmented reality technology improves, you're going to see it in use everywhere — including the operating room. German research institute Fraunhofer MEVIS has created an app that lets surgeons use the iPad as a...

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


MORE NEWS


Lawsuits increasing over skin-related laser surgeries performed by non-physicians
UCLA Newsroom
Skin-related laser procedures such as body hair removal are among the most popular elective laser surgeries in the U.S. To meet demand, more non-physicians are performing these procedures than ever before. A study published online Oct. 16 in JAMA Dermatology, a journal of the American Medical Association, found that lawsuits related to procedures in which non-physicians operate the laser are increasing, particularly when performed outside a traditional medical setting.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


MicroRNA screen may up thyroid nodule Dx
MedPage Today
A test that looks at gene mutations and microRNA (miRNA) in indeterminate thyroid nodules may help clarify which patients need surgery, researchers reported here. In a small study, known mutations associated with thyroid cancer correctly identified 58 percent of cancerous thyroid biopsies, but sensitivity rose to 81 percent when miRNA expression analysis was included, Emmanuel Labourier, Ph.D., of test-maker Asuragen, reported at the American Thyroid Association meeting.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Bariatric surgery offers hope for diabetics
Medcity News
This post is part of ongoing coverage of Cleveland Clinic’s 2013 Medical Innovation Summit: Finding Balance through Innovation. Obesity, Diabetes & the Metabolic Crisis. Bariatric surgery has been a hot topic, offering a spectrum of benefits, especially for patients with diabetes. In addition to hearing about weight loss surgeries, Medical Innovation Summit attendees watched a live bariatric surgery via a screen miles away from the operating room.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Limited access for young surgeons to operating theatre
U.S. Top News
Some recently selected surgeons out in the open healing centers are getting access to theatres to work for a day in a fortnight - notwithstanding climbing holding up records. Professor Paddy Broe, a surgeon in Beaumont Hospital in Dublin, said the specialists are at danger of losing their abilities, and this means dangers for patients. Different surgeons can land in healing center in the morning and see their arranged theatre record annihilated due to an absence of bunks, he told the yearly gathering of the Irish Hospital Consultants' Association (IHCA).
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study: 2 major breakthroughs in new surgeon rating (Forbes)
Surgeons report 2 new approaches to lessen postoperative pain (redOrbit)
Looking to share your expertise? (MultiBriefs)
Surgical knife may sniff out cancer (LiveScience)
Doctors in Los Angeles successfully perform heart operation on fetus (Catholic Online)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Jessica Taylor, Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
Contribute news

This edition of AASPA Newsline was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Oct. 22, 2013
Oct. 15, 2013
Oct. 8, 2013
Oct. 1, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063