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Evaluation of hospital infection prevention policies can identify opportunities for improvement
Medical Xpress
Identifying gaps in infection prevention practices may yield opportunities for improved patient safety, according to a survey published in the November issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). Ascension Health, the nation's largest non-profit healthcare system with hospitals and related healthcare facilities in 23 states and the District of Columbia, conducted a 96-question survey of 71 of its member hospitals to evaluate infection control processes for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and surgical-site infections (SSI).
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Early detection, treatment critical for oral lesions
Modern Medicine
Cancers and precancers of the oral mucosa are notoriously challenging to treat and, according to one expert, a heightened vigilance spanning different specialties remains key in reducing the morbidity and mortality in patients. “The early diagnosis of precancerous and cancerous lesions in the oral cavity is absolutely critical. Despite the advances in surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, these treatment approaches may only have a palliative effect in many cases and often prove to be too little, too late for a large majority of unfortunate patients,” says Marcia Ramos-e-Silva, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and head, sector of dermatology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.
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RA drugs may be safe before surgery
Arthritis Today
People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who take a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), such as methotrexate, or a biologic drug, such as etanercept (Enbrel) or adalimumab (Humira), may be able to stay on their medication before undergoing surgery without significantly increasing their risk of infection, according to a study presented at the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting this week in San Diego.
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Reconstructive surgeon donates procedures for misdiagnosed woman
USA Today
Reconstructive surgeon donates procedures for woman brought to U.S. from Kazakhstan. Misdiagnosed with terminal cancer and disfigured by radiation treatments, Lessya Kotelevskaya's life was in shambles - an impoverished and isolated single mother living in a car wash basement in Kazakhstan. Barely able to open her jaw to eat, she weighed just 79 pounds.
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Aortic valves best replaced at high-volume centers
Medpage Today
High-risk patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) experience less morbidity and mortality at the hospitals that perform the most procedures, a population-based study reported. Mortality at high volume hospitals was 2.41 percent versus 4.34 percent at low volume hospitals, wrote Dr. Himanshu J. Patel.

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No effect of resident hour limits on neurosurgical outcomes
Medscape (free subscription)
Restrictions on duty hours for neurosurgery residents has not resulted in significant changes in mortality for neurosurgery patients, a new study shows. The study did show a slight drop in the proportion of U.S. neurosurgery patients who went straight home from the hospital after 2003, when the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education limited the hours residents could be required to work. But overall, "there weren't any dramatic changes before or after the work hour changes," Kiersten Norby, M.D., told Medscape Medical News.

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Google Glass in the OR: There's an app for that, but would you trust it with your spleen?
Venture Beat
Remote healthcare has long been one of the most exciting promises of the Google Glass platform, and today at DEMO, we got a taste of how that would actually work. Pristine EyeSight and Pristing CheckLists from startup Pristine are two new applications designed for surgery, anesthesia, and telemedicine in general.

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The role of manganese and astrocytes in brain toxicity
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
The interactions between the astrocytes and neurons play a central role in brain functioning via neurotransmitter recycling, and disruption of this recycling is associated with several neuropathological conditions. Manganese-mediated toxicity helps in better understanding about cycling between the neurons and astrocytes, and this knowledge about the brain function might highlight potential molecular tools for neurotoxicity.
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Sentinel lymph node surgery associated with a high false negative rate in node-positive breast cancer
2minutemedicine
In breast cancer, lymph node status is important in helping guide treatment decisions.  In clinically node positive breast cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is often used before surgery to assess the tumor's response and hopefully lead to breast-conserving surgery.  After neoadjuvant therapy, surgeons will often use axillary node dissection (ALND) to evaluate chemotherapeutic response; however this procedure can cause significant morbidity.
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Reversal of antiplatelet therapy may not benefit TBI
Medscape
Patients with traumatic brain injury may not benefit from transfusions of platelets to reverse their antiplatelet therapy, a new study shows. "Reversal of antiplatelet therapy was not associated with decreased progression of intracranial injury," said Joshua Bauer, MS, a researcher at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania.
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Increasing rate of knee replacements linked to obesity among young, researchers say
Medical Xpress
Contrary to popular myth, it is not the aging Baby Boomer or weekend warrior that is causing the unprecedented increase in knee replacement surgeries. Data gathered by more than 125 orthopedic surgeons from 22 states across the U.S. show a more mundane culprit: rising rates of obesity among those under the age of 65.
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Anterior hip replacement speeds recovery, lessens pain and scarring
Digital Journal
Living with constant hip pain can literally drag you down, causing once-active people to live more sedentary lives. But anterior hip replacement surgery, a minimally invasive option typically performed on a unique device known as a Hana orthopedic table, has made this form of hip replacement more appealing to a wide range of patients of all ages, according to Joel Buchalter, M.D., a founding partner of Somers Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine Group, PLLC.
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    Spinal fusions serve as case study for debate over when certain surgeries are necessary (The Washington Post)
Invuity launches handheld illuminator with suction for trauma surgery (Healio)
Study: Looking at surgeries addressing eye-muscle problems (The Chicago Tribune)

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