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Home   Conferences   Member Center   Publications   Policies   Career Development Feb. 1, 2011
Science in the News


War-time stress may lead to increased risk of death by coronary heart disease in later life
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War-time stress may lead to an increased risk death by coronary heart disease in later life. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Health Services Research surveyed a cohort of 55 year old Finnish WW2 veterans in 1980, and then carried out a follow-up study 28 years later. More

Study shows workers most invested in their jobs have highest stress levels
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A workplace's key employees may be at the greatest risk of experiencing high levels of work stress, according to a new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). In a survey of 2,737 workers, 18 percent reported that their job was "highly stressful." More

Renal cancer risk and occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and plastics
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To investigate whether occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and certain plastic monomers increased renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk. More

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6 key points to tackle substance abuse, addiction problems among nurses
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As many as ten to 20 percent of nurses and nursing students may have substance abuse and addiction problems, but the key to tackling this difficult issue -- and protecting public safety -- is support and treatment, not punishment. That is the key message in a paper in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Nursing. More

Sleep quality affected by workplace noise-related hearing loss
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Sustained exposure to loud workplace noise may affect quality of sleep in workers with occupational-related hearing loss, according to a new study by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev researchers. Published in the journal Sleep, the study compared the sleep quality of individuals at the same workplace, some with workplace noise-related hearing loss and some without. More

Occupational rehabilitation in Hong Kong: Current status and future needs
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This paper reviews the development of occupational rehabilitation in Hong Kong, both in terms of the science as well as the service for injured workers. Besides, it also reviews the existing Employees' Compensation Ordinance for work injury to illustrate how the policy could influence the success and development of the discipline. More
Science in the News is brought to you as an information service. The articles contained herein do not necessarily represent the views of ACOEM.
Science in the News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2633   Download media kit
Jennifer Maddox, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2613   Contribute news
Disclaimer: ACOEM does not warrant or make any representation as to the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, advertised products, or other materials on this electronic newsletter.
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