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ADAA NEWS

ADAA announces awards for early career professionals, residents, trainees and students
ADAA
The Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) is now accepting applications for its 2015 Awards Program: Career Development Leadership Program, Donald F. Klein Early Career Investigator Award and Clinician Trainee Award. Eligible applicants are graduate and medical students, residents, clinical trainees and early career professionals who have completed their training or degrees within the past three years and have an interest in pursuing careers focusing on anxiety disorders and depression. These awards engage aspiring professionals with ADAA through participation at the annual conference and a unique pairing of winners with a senior mentor from ADAA membership. They will be presented at the Anxiety and Depression Conference, April 9-12, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency Miami.

Application deadlines
  • Career Development Leadership Program: Nov. 20
  • Donald F. Klein Early Investigator Award: Nov. 20
  • Clinician Trainee Award: Nov. 20
Please visit ADAA’s website for individual awards criteria and to apply by their respective deadlines.
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2015 ADAA annual conference — David Barlow to give Ross lecture
ADAA
Share it together ... Learn it together ... Change it together.
The sun is brighter in Miami. Join us there April 9-12, for the 2015 ADAA annual conference: Anxiety and Depression: Translating Research, Innovating Practice.

Just announced — David Barlow, Ph.D., a long-standing member of ADAA, will give the Jerilyn Ross Lecture, which honors the memory and life work of the ADAA co-founder and mental health field pioneer.

This conference is the professional hub for clinicians and researchers in the field of anxiety and depression, and related disorders who want to share, learn, innovate and advance the field in meaningful ways.

Why come? Because this is truly a unique space. Here you will share research and clinical experiences, help translate ideas, learn new practice strategies and techniques, connect with leaders in the field to build your network, hone your skills and get inspired.
Register today.

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Join ADAA today!
ADAA
Join now! Become a member of ADAA and network with experts in anxiety disorders and depression, market your practice and receive discounts on continuing education.
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ADAA RESOURCES


Special DVD offer
ADAA

Accelerated Treatment for Anxiety: Core Concepts with Reid Wilson, Ph.D. ($59.00)

1.5 CE credits available online from psychotherapy.net (additional fee).

Reid Wilson, Ph.D., sums up the fundamentals of tackling the most common condition confronting psychotherapists. In this lively new video, combining a live presentation with an accompanying case demonstration, he illustrates the core concepts of his groundbreaking technique and paradoxical twist in exposure therapy.

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RESOURCES FOR VETERANS


Coaching into care: Virginia coaches help supporters of veterans make the tough decision to get help
Amber Walser, Psy.D. via Care for your mind
According to The Department of Veterans Affairs, nearly 30 percent of Veterans serving in Iraq and Afghanistan since Sept. 11, 2001, who have been treated at Virginia hospitals and clinics, have been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article, read about an innovative Virginia program that assists loved ones and friends who want to learn how to better support the veteran in their life and encourage him or her to seek professional support.

Real Warriors Campaign
  • Seven tools that reinforce psychological health for veterans brochure
    This brochure highlights the campaign’s tools and resources to help veterans manage common challenges experienced in post-military life, such as transition to a civilian career, understanding veterans’ health benefits and coping with psychological health concerns.

  • Five steps veterans can take to support PTSD treatment
    Recovery from post traumatic stress disorder can be an ongoing, daily and gradual process. It does not happen through sudden insight and it requires veterans to use their strength to reach out for treatment. But influences outside of treatment such as support from fellow veterans, continuing education or returning to work can have a positive influence on recovery. If you are a veteran coping with PTSD, consider taking the five steps in this article to support your return to peak performance.

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RESEARCH AND PRACTICE NEWS


The impact of comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders on severity of anorexia nervosa in adolescent girls
The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Scientists examined the impact of comorbid depression and anxiety disorders on the severity of anorexia nervosa (AN) in adolescent girls. Adolescent girls with AN were divided into one group with and another group without comorbid disorders, and selected subjective and objective measures of illness severity were compared between the two groups.
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Study: Breast cancer survivors at high risk for depression
HealthDay News
Breast cancer patients are 70 percent more likely than their cancer-free peers to check into a hospital for severe depression and three times as likely to require antidepressants during the year after diagnosis, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Depression can linger for years and is more likely in older patients and those with node-positive cancer. "Doctors treating these women must be attentive to this problem and try to address the issues leading to a depression as part of the clinical treatment of breast cancer," said lead researcher Dr. Christoffer Johansen.
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Pregnant women with PTSD more likely to give birth prematurely
Stanford Medicine
Pregnant women with post traumatic stress disorder are at increased risk of giving birth prematurely, a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has found. The study, which examined more than 16,000 births to female veterans, is the largest ever to evaluate connections between PTSD and preterm birth.
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Brain's threat response calmed by seeing love and support
PsychCentral
New research suggests that being reminded of being loved and cared for can reduce the brain’s hypervigilant response to stress. University of Exeter, U.K., investigators found that observing pictures of others being loved and cared for reduces the brain’s response to threat. The findings may aid the treatment of anxiety-related disorders and conditions such as post traumatic stress disorder.
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Cognitive therapy, mindfulness may help with menopausal depression
Reuters
Psychotherapy and mindfulness techniques could help many women who experience depression during menopause, according to a review of existing research. Too few studies have looked at whether cognitive therapies are good alternatives for women who can’t or don’t want to use pharmaceutical treatments, the authors conclude, but the handful that did mostly showed positive results.
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Teenage anxiety: Tailored treatment needed
BBC News
A one-size-fits-all approach to treating teenagers with anxiety problems may be putting their futures at risk, a study suggests. University of Reading psychologists say current childhood therapies are simply being adapted for teenagers. But they argue that adolescents face distinct issues and call for tailored treatments to address them.
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New Stanford study reveals that girls under stress age more rapidly
Standford Report
Stress takes a toll on both mind and body. Intuitively, that's not a big surprise. Many studies have found links among stress, depression and disease. But scientists didn't really know which came first: stress, depression or changes in the body. Stanford psychologist Ian Gotlib and colleagues at Stanford, Northwestern University and the University of California, San Francisco, found one way to address this question.
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Too much sitting may cause depression
Reuters via Health24
A new analysis of previous studies connects too much sitting at the computer or lying around watching TV to a greater risk of depression. Based on dozens of studies covering hundreds of thousands of participants, Chinese researchers found that sedentary behavior was linked to a 25 percent higher likelihood of being depressed compared to people who were not sedentary.
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Ketamine helps patients with bipolar disorder, depression, but works differently among the 2
Translational Psychiatry via Medical Daily
Researchers from The National Mental Health Institute (NIMH) at the National Institutes of Health have been studying the antidepressant effects of ketamine — a hallucinatory drug commonly known as “special k” — for years now. While prior studies confirmed the drug can rapidly reduce disordered symptoms, the latest from NIMH refines these findings to emphasize ketamine affects bipolar and depression patients differently.
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Medical tests for PTSD and TBI not far off
Military Times
Researchers are inching closer to creating medical tests to detect post traumatic stress or mild traumatic brain injury — conditions that now are diagnosed only with self-reported symptoms and subjective exams. Scientists from five institutions are one year into a five-year, $42.9 million study to find biomarkers that can indicate evidence of these injuries common to combat veterans.
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Landmark 20-year study finds pesticides linked to depression in farmers
Modern Farmer
Earlier this fall, researchers from the National Institute of Health finished up a landmark 20-year study, a study that hasn’t received the amount of coverage it deserves. About 84,000 farmers and spouses of farmers were interviewed since the mid-1990s to investigate the connection between pesticides and depression, a connection that had been suggested through anecdotal evidence for far longer.
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Depression comes with a lack of intuition, hindering decision-making processes
Medical Daily
Depression is all-encompassing in its effects on the mind and body. Not only does it make someone feel a deep sense of dread, sadness and hopelessness, it also impedes other processes in the brain. One of these processes is the ability to make decisions, and a new study finds that the reason for this could be because depression takes away a person’s intuition.
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Changes in speech patterns could be used to monitor mental health
PsychCentral
New research may lead to a smartphone app that analyzes your speech to monitor your mental health. It’s based on research from the University of Maryland that shows that certain vocal features change as feelings of depression worsen. Researchers envision the day when those who are feeling depressed can open the app on their smartphone and simply talk about their day.
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About Anxiety & Depression Insights

This news brief is a timely update about anxiety disorders and depression sent to members of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and other professionals interested in this area. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of the reader. External resources are not a part of the ADAA website, and ADAA is not responsible for the content of external sites. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by ADAA of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site. For more information about ADAA, visit www.ADAA.org.
 



Anxiety & Depression Insights
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Lauren Swan, Content Editor, 202.684.7496  
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