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Home   Membership   Members Only   Certification   Education   Current Journal   Foundation September 22, 2015

 



US commits $160 million to building better cities using sensors and data
The Verge
The U.S. government wants to use sensors to make cities a lot more livable. The White House announced that $160 million will be spent on creating what it calls "smart cities," cities that are wired up with sensors that can relay data back to local organizations, companies and governments so that they can identify issues and more quickly respond to changes.
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ADA answers: Determining accessibility requirements
Facilitiesnet
One common challenge for maintenance and engineering managers in institutional and commercial facilities is determining when renovations trigger a requirement to bring a building in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and exactly how much compliance is required when this happens. The requirements for readily achievable barrier removal under the ADA began Jan. 26, 1992, and have been ongoing. Under the ADA, barriers must be removed, with a few exceptions, regardless of any work being done.
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Instruction manual for futuristic 'metallic glass'
University of New South Wales via ScienceDaily
Creating futuristic, next-generation materials called "metallic glass" that are ultrastrong and ultraflexible will become easier and cheaper, based on UNSW Australia research that can predict for the first time which combinations of metals will best form these useful materials. Just like something from science fiction — think of the Liquid-Metal Man robot assassin (T-1000) in the "Terminator" films — these materials behave more like glass or plastic than metal.
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LED lights that play music: Great idea or practical joke?
TechHive
As smart devices evolve, they develop new abilities. Often that takes the form of a symbiotic relationship in which two devices work together, like a door sensor that'll turn on your lights. In other cases, a smart device combines two separate functions in the same package. That's what we have here is smart lighting that also plays music: connected light bulbs with embedded wireless powered speakers, and both elements can be controlled from a mobile device or a computer.
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To improve savings, optimize the resource management life cycle
Environmental Leader
Energy managers and facility managers face a myriad of challenges — from properly forecasting energy, to procurement of energy, to optimizing a particular asset, to managing and processing bills in a timely manner, to preempting equipment failures or fixing faults when they happen — and many are short staffed and can only deal with problems as they arise rather than having time to work on forward planning.
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OSHA updates fire protection systems manual
Occupational Health & Safety
Saying firefighters, because their work is often urgent and stressful, often make decisions without vital information on the hazards that exist, OSHA has revised one of its manuals to better protect them. "Fire Service Features of Buildings and Fire Protection Systems" explains how fire personnel can resolve an incident sooner and more safely if a building's design is tailored to meet their needs during an emergency.
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Green building's impact outpacing conventional construction
Builder
The green building sector is outpacing overall construction growth in the U.S. and will account for more than 2.3 million American jobs this year, according to a new U.S. Green Building Council study. The 2015 Green Building Economic Impact Study, prepared by Booz Allen Hamilton, finds the green building industry contributes more than $134.3 billion in labor income to working Americans. The study also found that green construction's growth rate is rapidly outpacing that of conventional construction and will continue to rise.
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Researchers developed highly accurate method for measuring luminous efficacy of LEDs
Aalto University via Phys.org
The method helps discovering the most efficient lamps, which may save billions in lighting costs in the future. Researchers at Aalto University and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have succeeded in developing a method that helps to improve the relative uncertainty in measuring the luminous efficacy of LEDs from the approximate 5 percent of today to 1 percent in the future.
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Why we may soon be building 10-story buildings out of wood
The Washington Post
The Obama administration — more specifically, its Department of Agriculture, headed by Tom Vilsack — has a surprising idea about the future of large building construction. For environmental purposes but also to potentially stoke a new industry, it wants the United States to explore constructing really big buildings — 10 stories or more — out of wood.
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High-tech lighting displays are reshaping Dallas' skyline at night
The Dallas Morning News
Downtown Dallas' new KPMG Plaza tower is all business during the day, with its conservative blue-gray glass exterior. But as soon as the sun goes down, the Arts District high-rise is ready to party with an eye-popping light show. LED strips on the exterior of the 18-story Ross Avenue building flash snippets of classic movies to light up the northeast corner of downtown. "The character of our downtown skyline is definitely changing," said lighting designer Scott Oldner, who did the display on the building.
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