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Scientists make breakthrough on eruption risk
The New Zealand Herald
Bulging in land that occurs before a volcano erupts points to how much ash will be spewed into the sky, providing a useful early warning for aviation, geologists in Iceland say. The telltale came from data from global positioning system sensors placed around the notorious Icelandic volcano Grimsvoetn, they said. Just before Grimsvoetn blew its stack in May 2011, the ground around the volcano started to bulge.
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Ancient map could warn of active volcano
Discovery News
Approximately 9,000 years ago in Anatolia, Turkey, an artist drew what could be the world’s oldest known map, complete with a volcano erupting in the background. A recent discovery of lava rock from that time serves as evidence that the painting may indeed be an early example of both cartography and vulcanology.
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Bacteria could make oil extraction less disruptive to environment
The News-Gazette
More than a mile beneath Decatur, Ill., where temperatures reach 122 degrees and no light penetrates, lives a community of bacteria happily munching on iron and other geological delicacies. The bacteria, known as Halomonas, thrive in extreme conditions. One of their most interesting traits is that they metabolize hydrocarbons — essentially, they eat oil.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Environment.


AIPG NEWS


Accepting applications for the position of AIPG Executive Director
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The successful candidate will succeed the current director who has announced his intent to retire. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
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Pay 2014 dues online — Past due
AIPG
Annual membership dues were due Jan. 1 in accordance with the Bylaws. If you have not yet paid your dues, you are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2014. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on MEMBER LOGIN to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
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A History of AIPG 1963-2003
AIPG
This 390 page book includes many photographs, a Who's Who/Who Was Who in AIPG, and more than 70 selected speeches and papers by CPGs. Find answers to questions like: How did AIPG really get started? What roles did the well-established AAPG and AGI play in the formation of the first professional (not scientific) geological society? Who were the "Magnificent Seven" who founded AIPG in 1963? The answers to these and other questions make interesting reading to the curious as to the formation and progress of AIPG.
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AIPG Scholarship Program
AIPG
Scholarships are given to assist students with college education costs and to promote student participation in the American Institute of Professional Geologists. Up to four scholarships will be awarded to declared undergraduate geological sciences majors who are at least sophomores. Scholarship awards in the amount of $1,000 each will be made to eligible students attending a college or university in the U.S. Scholarships are to be used to support tuition and/or room and board.
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Order extra copies of the Student issue
AIPG
Individuals and Sections encouraged are to purchase extra copies of the Student issue to provide to Universities and Colleges with Geology Departments. This is a good way to generate interest in a student chapter.
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Request for 2014 National Awards Nominations
AIPG
Send in your nominations for the AIPG 2014 National Awards due January 20, 2014. Click here for information on the awards and for the nomination form.
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New store item: AIPG white ceramic mug
AIPG
This 11-ounce white ceramic mug is available to AIPG members for $12 (includes shipping).


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Jurassic spider: KU scientist discovers largest known arachnid fossil
Lawrence Journal-World
As if dinosaurs weren’t enough to contend with in the world of 165 million years ago, the Jursassic period had other frightful creatures roaming the Earth as well: giant spiders. In fact, a Kansas University researcher recently identified the largest known fossilized spider, a relic of the Middle Jurassic period.

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Moon dust mystery solved with help of Apollo mission data
The Huffington Post
A revisited trove of data from NASA's Apollo missions more than 40 years ago is helping scientists answer a lingering lunar question: How fast does moon dust build up? The answer: It would take 1,000 years for a layer of moon dust about a millimeter (0.04 inches) thick to accumulate. That's 10 times faster than scientists previously believed.

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Geologists find the cause of earthquake lights
Examiner.com
Geologists have determined the cause of earthquake lights and may be able to use the rare phenomenon to predict earthquakes before they happen according to their research published in the Jan. 2, 2014, issue of the journal Seismological Research Letters.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Ocean's hidden waves show their power: Origins of giant underwater waves explained
Science Daily
Large-scale tests in the lab and the South China Sea reveal the origins of underwater waves that can tower hundreds of feet. Their effect on the surface of the ocean is negligible, producing a rise of just inches that is virtually imperceptible on a turbulent sea. But internal waves, which are hidden entirely within the ocean, can tower hundreds of feet, with profound effects on Earth's climate and on ocean ecosystems.
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Mega-landslide in giant Utah copper mine may have triggered earthquakes
Geological Society of America via Science Codex
The largest nonvolcanic landslide in the recorded history of North America took place April 10, 2013, during two episodes of collapse at Kennecott's Bingham Canyon open-pit copper mine in Utah. In the January 2014 issue of GSA Today, University of Utah geologists report the initial findings of their study of the seismic and sound waves generated by this massive mega-landslide. They found that each of the two landslide events produced seismic waves equivalent to a magnitude 2 to 3 earthquake.
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Geologists find natural asbestos fibers in Nevada
Arizona City Independent
Removing asbestos from an old building can be hazardous and expensive. So what happens if the ground outside is covered with the stuff for miles around? That's what a team of UNLV geologists is trying to figure out after the surprise discovery of potentially toxic, asbestos-type minerals in rocks and dust from Boulder City to the southeastern edge of the Las Vegas Valley.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Geologists identify trigger for apocalyptic 'super eruptions' (The Guardian)
Sea floor map result stuns experts (The New Zealand Herald)
The world's 2nd largest oil field, as seen from space (Scientific American)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Biofluorescence: Light fish see and reflect
Guardian Liberty Voice
Under the ocean, in the murky bottom weighted with tons of water, fish swim in what many consider the deep, dark sea, but it is now been revealed that by creating biofluorescence fish see and reflect light. Unperceived by the human eye, there is natural light. The light the fish see and subsequently reflect via biofluorescence is not generated by the fish, but by the perception of light around the fish.
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US Geological Survey Report on sediment in the San Francisco Bay, Delta and coastal system includes hydraulic gold mining
Sierra Sun Times
Wherever water flows, it almost always carries sediment, which helps to create natural habitats and to alter geography. An understanding of its complex processes is key to many planning and conservation decisions. In the San Francisco Bay Area — an estuarine region defined by its bay, rivers, delta and coast — sediment plays a particularly major role.
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UCR researchers: World's oldeset diamonds are fake
Highlander
Nearly half a decade ago, geologists believed that they had discovered petite gems inside zircon crystals from Western Australia's Jack Hills, which were considered to be the world's oldest diamonds. The minerals were considered to be 4.3 billion years old, suggesting that the primordial earth cooled at a much earlier rate, in order to create a thick, continental crust under which diamonds could be formed.
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