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Grand Canyon is not so ancient
Nature
A longstanding geological fight over the age of one of the most iconic landscapes in the United States — the Grand Canyon — may finally be over. The massive chasm does not date back 70 million years, as earlier work had suggested, but was born in its entirety 5‒6 million years ago when older, shorter canyons linked together to form the complete structure. This explanation aims to reconcile a flurry of seemingly contradictory findings that enlivened discussion about when the canyon was carved.
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1st dinosaur bones in Saudi Arabia discovered
KBMT-TV
For palaeontologists, the Middle East has long proven a bit of a blind spot. Evidence of dinosaurs has proven scarce, and what little surfaces from time to time has been traditionally difficult to itemize. That changed recently when an international team of scientists uncovered the first evidence of dinosaurs in Saudi Arabia near the coast of the Red Sea.
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Arizona State president: To encourage science literacy, fix the universities
Scientific American (preview)
(Editor's note: This article is from the Oct. 2012 issue of Scientific American. A preview is available through the Scientific American archives. The full article is available by purchasing the full issue.)

The prevailing approach to teaching science, technology, engineering or mathematics generally serves only to enhance gifted students already predisposed towards science and math. These elite students may hearten their professors, but the other 90 percent are being shortchanged. The best way to teach today's hyperconnected students is to get rid of the departments of geology and biology.

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AIPG NEWS


Student scholarship deadline: Feb. 15
AIPG
Scholarships are given to assist students with college education costs and to promote student participation in the American Institute of Professional Geologists. Up to four scholarships will be awarded to declared undergraduate geological sciences majors who are at least sophomores. Scholarship awards in the amount of $1,000 each will be made to eligible students attending a college or university in the U.S. Applications must be received by Feb. 15.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  ENVIRONMENTAL AND GEOTECHNICAL DRILLING

Double J Drilling of W.Va.,Inc.is a woman-owned,small business with over 35 years performing drilling and well installation services for Government,Industry,and Consultants throughout the Mid-Atlantic region.

Phone: 304-375-4629             E-Mail: djdray@wirefire.com
 


Accepting applications for the position of AIPG Executive Director
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The successful candidate will succeed the current director who has announced his intent to retire. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
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AIPG Colorado Section Legislative Reception
AIPG
The reception help educate our legislators on fracking, coal and the mineral/energy industry in Colorado will take place from 5:30-7:30 p.m., Feb. 27, at the University Club. Contact Larry Cerrillo for more information.
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  Remediation Injection...we do that!

A site investigation or injection / remediation project requires safe & effective implementation. Geo Lab has the tools, capabilities & experience to do that. Click here for more...
 


Shale-Gas Development and Water Issues Symposium
AIPG
The AIPG/AGWT 3nd Shale-Gas Development and Water Issues Symposium will be held March 11-12 at the Norris Conference Centers in Houston. Driving directions and information on area hotels are available.
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AIPG 5th Annual Symposium: Call for abstracts
AIPG
AIPG has issued a call for abstracts for its 5th Annual Symposium: Marcellus, Utica, and Point Pleasant Shale: Energy Development and Enhancement, April 16-17, 2014, in Columbus, Ohio.
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5th Conference: Innovative Environmental Assessment and Remediation Technology
AIPG
AIPG Georgia Section's 5th Conference: Innovative Environmental Assessment and Remediation Technology will be held April 23-24 at Kennesaw State University. Individual registrations, Exhibitor registrations and Sponsor registrations are open online.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Groundwater Monitoring Equipment & Supplies

Waterra has been providing customers with Simple Solutions for Groundwater Monitoring since 1985. Our product line has grown considerably to include pumps, filters, water level and hydrocarbon detection equipment, water quality testing equipment, bailers and other accessories. Waterra products are designed with the goal of making your life easier in the field.
 


AIPG fleece scarf available
AIPG
This fleece scarf provides comfort against the cold breeze. Made of anti-pill polyester, this scarf features a matching whipstitch with an embroidered AIPG logo. Available in black or navy.


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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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Dead plants hold earthquake secrets
Discovery News
With a few tricks borrowed from the oil industry, scientists are hoping to one day better understand why earthquakes start and stop. Over the past few years, researchers have devised a new way to find old earthquakes. It turns out that earthquakes can "cook" dead plants and algae trapped in a fault, similar to how organic material transforms over eons into oil.

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Super volcano: Self control revealed by synchrotron
Spectroscopy Now
The risk of a supervolcano eruption is, according to geochemical synchrotron X-ray studies carried out by scientists in Europe and Japan almost entirely associated with magma pressure and needs no external trigger. Details are reported in the journal Nature Geosciences this month.

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Drones offer 360-degree vision for oil-hunting geologists
The Conversation
Geologists are using drones to help extract more resources from the North Sea, using the latest visual technologies to identify oil-bearing rocks. Using an eight-rotor, camera-equipped "octocopter" drone to record rock faces in minute detail, the research team from the Universities of Aberdeen and Bergen in Norway are creating a "Google Earth for geologists."

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Geologists produce new map of Antarctica's south Victoria Land
Voxy
A new geological map of southern Victoria Land in Antarctica shows the area in more detail than ever before. Covering 84,600 square kilometers, including the largest ice-free area of Antarctica, it replaces a 1962 map generated by New Zealand geologists Bernie Gunn and Guyon Warren. Published by GNS Science, it is the 22nd and last in a series of major regional geological maps at 1:250,000 scale.
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Ancient marine fossil found
Stuff
A unique fossil found at the tip of New Zealand's South Island has been recognized as a 20-million-year-old marine ancestor. The fossil, discovered near Cape Farewell, was collected and analysed by geologists at the University of Otago. They described it as a close relation to the ancestors of modern dolphins and toothed whales.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Fossil.


Source of Galapagos eruptions not where models place it
University of Oregon via ScienceDaily
Images gathered by scientists using seismic waves penetrating to a depth of 300 kilometers have found an anomaly that likely is the volcanic mantle plume of the Galapagos Islands. It's not where geologists and computer modeling had assumed.
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1st ocean vesicles spotted
MIT via Environmental Research Web
Marine cyanobacteria — tiny ocean plants that produce oxygen and make organic carbon using sunlight and CO2 — are primary engines of Earth's biogeochemical and nutrient cycles. They nourish other organisms through the provision of oxygen and with their own body mass, which forms the base of the ocean food chain. Now scientists at MIT have discovered another dimension of the outsized role played by these tiny cells: The cyanobacteria continually produce and release vesicles — spherical packages containing carbon and other nutrients that can serve as food parcels for marine organisms.
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River roulette: Rethinking how rivers erode
Mother Nature Network
Rivers may seem steady and predictable, but it turns out that they may be a little wilder than scientists once thought. Instead of evenly eating through rock for millions of years, inching downward at a constant rate, rivers erode rock at different speeds through time, according to a recent study.
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'Doughnut Rock' added to Mars' mystery object hall of fame
National Geographic
Mars has a way of serving up mystery objects that befuddle and delight us earthlings. Crumbling canals, a mysterious sphinx and now something that looks like a crumpled jelly doughnut have confused and delighted scientists.
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