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Old rocks open new debate on life's origins
The Australian
Australian researchers could cost their country its claim to the world's oldest fossils, after finding life on Earth may have developed a billion years earlier than is generally accepted. Fossilized bacteria in the Pilbara, dated as about 3.5 billion years old, are considered the earliest evidence of life on the planet. But an Australian-led team studying what are thought to be the world's oldest rocks, on Canada's Hudson Bay coast, believes the ingredients for life were present 900 million years earlier.
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Dinosaur fossils from China help Penn researchers describe new 'Titan'
Heritage Daily
A team led by University of Pennsylvania paleontologists has characterized a new dinosaur based on fossil remains found in northwestern China. The species, a plant-eating sauropod named Yongjinglong datangi, roamed during the Early Cretaceous period, more than 100 million years ago. This sauropod belonged to a group known as Titanosauria, members of which were among the largest living creatures to ever walk the earth.
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A newly detected fracture suggests that tectonic forces are pulling the continents together once again
Discover Magazine
Geologists mapping seismic activity and underwater topography off the coast of Portugal say the tectonic forces that once split and spread the ancient supercontinent Pangea across the surface of the globe appear to be shifting into reverse, setting our existing continents on an eventual collision course.
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AIPG NEWS


AGI accepting applications for the position of Director of Education and Outreach
AIPG
AGI is seeking an experienced individual to serve as its Director of Education and Outreach and lead for AGI's Center for Geoscience Education and Public Understanding. Review of applications will begin on Feb. 17 and will continue until the position is filled.
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AIPG new applicants and members listing
AIPG
Nov. 22, 2013 through Jan. 24, 2014
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  ENVIRONMENTAL AND GEOTECHNICAL DRILLING

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Call for abstracts — Ohio Shale Conference
AIPG
Join AIPG and the Ohio Section of AIPG for this conference. It is structured to allow consideration and ample discussion of the most crucial aspects of the hydrofracturing process as it pertains to gas production in shale and other tight formations. Abstract are due Feb. 17. Registration is available online or via printable form. Exhibitors and Sponsors are welcome!
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Mark your calendar
AIPG
AIPG will have a booth at the following meetings this year. If you are attending any of these meetings please stop by and say hello or if you would like to volunteer to help staff the booth please contact the office at 303-412-6205 or aipg@aipg.org.
  • Feb. 23-26 — SME, Salt Lake City
  • March 23-25 — GSA, Lancaster, Pa.
  • April 9-11 — GSA, Blacksburg, Va.
  • April 24-25 — GSA, Lincoln, Neb.
  • May 19-21 — GSA, Bozeman, Mont.

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  Remediation Injection...we do that!

A site investigation or injection / remediation project requires safe & effective implementation. Geo Lab has the tools, capabilities & experience to do that. Click here for more...
 


AIPG Colorado Section Legislative Reception
AIPG
The reception, 5:30-7 p.m., Feb. 27, will help educate our legislators on fracking, coal and the mineral/energy industry in Colorado.
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AIPG/AGWT 3rd Oil & Gas Development and Water Issues Symposium
AIPG
This conference, March 11-12 in Houston, will showcase water use and treatment technologies and water re-use opportunities related to oil and gas development and operations. Technical information-exchange conference for professionals involved with water issues, energy development and hydraulic fracture technology. Register online today.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Groundwater Monitoring Equipment & Supplies

Waterra has been providing customers with Simple Solutions for Groundwater Monitoring since 1985. Our product line has grown considerably to include pumps, filters, water level and hydrocarbon detection equipment, water quality testing equipment, bailers and other accessories. Waterra products are designed with the goal of making your life easier in the field.
 


Call for abstracts — AIPG 5th Annual Symposium
AIPG
Peter MacKenzie, Vice President of Operations, Ohio Oil and Gas, will be the keynote speaker for this event, scheduled for April 16-17 in Columbus, Ohio. Exhibitor, sponsor and advertisement opportunities are also available.
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5th Conference: Innovative Environmental Assessment and Remediation Technology
AIPG
AIPG Georgia Section's 5th Conference: Innovative Environmental Assessment and Remediation Technology will be held April 23-24 at Kennesaw State University. Individual registrations, Exhibitor registrations and Sponsor registrations are open online.
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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

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Volunteers Needed for AIPG Booth at SME
AIPG
AIPG will be exhibiting at the 2014 SME Annual Meeting in February. AIPG Headquarters is looking for volunteers to help staff our display booth in Salt Lake City at the Salt Palace Convention Center. We are asking volunteers to sign up to work in two-hour shifts.

Exhibit days are as follows:
  • Sunday, Feb. 23: 4-6 p.m.
  • Monday, Feb. 24: 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Feb. 25: 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Feb. 26: 8 a.m.-noon
AIPG will have VIP passes available for our volunteers for exhibit hall use only. Scheduling will be on a first-come, first-served basis. If you decide to volunteer, please respond to vlh@aipg.org with your preference of day and time.

This provides us with an excellent opportunity for public outreach. This is a great chance to build our membership and talk about the benefits of AIPG. Thank You for your assistance and support! Our volunteers help AIPG to accomplish goals that we could not reach without them. Contact Vickie Hill, AIPG Membership Services Manager, vlh@aipg.org or 303-412-6205.

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Student scholarship deadline: Feb. 15
AIPG
Applicants must submit: a letter of interest with name, mail and email addresses, and telephone number; proof of enrollment in an eligible geological sciences program, transcripts; an original one-page essay on why the applicant wants to become a geologist; and a letter of support from a faculty member familiar with the applicant's academic work.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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NASA robots study impact sites and volcanoes
Product Design & Development
A team of researchers seeks to study what volcanoes and impact sites on Earth can tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and unique characteristics and features of our moon, the moons of Mars and asteroids. The Ames project was selected to join a new NASA virtual institute that will focus on questions concerning space science and human space exploration.

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Dead plants hold earthquake secrets
Discovery News
With a few tricks borrowed from the oil industry, scientists are hoping to one day better understand why earthquakes start and stop. Over the past few years, researchers have devised a new way to find old earthquakes. It turns out that earthquakes can "cook" dead plants and algae trapped in a fault, similar to how organic material transforms over eons into oil.

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Grand Canyon is not so ancient
Nature
A longstanding geological fight over the age of one of the most iconic landscapes in the United States — the Grand Canyon — may finally be over. The massive chasm does not date back 70 million years, as earlier work had suggested, but was born in its entirety 5‒6 million years ago when older, shorter canyons linked together to form the complete structure. This explanation aims to reconcile a flurry of seemingly contradictory findings that enlivened discussion about when the canyon was carved.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Arctic excursion explores how sea life copes with continuous winter darkness
University of Delaware
Traditionally the polar night in the North Pole has been thought to be a biological wasteland. Relatively recent studies, however, show there to be significant activity in this light-limited environment. Students and faculty from the University of Delaware's School of Marine Science and Policy in the College of Earth, Ocean and Environment joined an international group of researchers in Norway to better understand how marine organisms there survive when the sunlight disappears.
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New study details methane's complexity in Northern Tier geology
State Impact
Researchers recently released new findings, based on what they said is the largest published geochemistry database in the Appalachian basin, that detail the natural occurrence and distinctive features of methane tucked into the thousands of feet of rock between the surface and the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania's five Northern Tier counties.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Methane.


The glacier which may have sunk the Titanic is now moving at record speeds
The Independent
The Greenland glacier that was thought to have been responsible for the sinking of the Titanic is moving four times faster into the sea than it was in 1960s and its instability could result in it moving at 10 times the speed by the end of the century, a study has found.
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Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Arizona State president: To encourage science literacy, fix the universities (Scientific American — preview)
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From rivers to landslides: Charting the slopes of sediment transport
California Institute of Technology via Science Codex
In the Earth Surface Dynamics Lab at the California Institute of Technology the behavior of rivers is modeled through the use of artificial rivers — flumes — through which water can be pumped at varying rates over a variety of carefully graded sediments while drag force and acceleration are measured. One such newly constructed flume demonstrates that the slope of streambeds has dramatic and unexpected effects on sediment transport.
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Huge boulders leave trail of destruction in northern Italy
South Wales Evening Post
VideoBrief Around 4,000 cubic meters of rock broke away from a cliff face in Tramin, northern Italy, and came crashing down, through a 300-year-old barn, and into vineyards, causing millions of pounds worth of damage. A muddy trail of gouged earth runs down from the cliffs, straight through where the barn used to be and down to two massive boulders which came to rest in a field. The landslide was reportedly caused by a rock tower in the cliff face dissolving.
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Huge magma chamber found below Hawaiian volcano
UPI via Dalje.com
Geologists say they've confirmed the existence of a previously unknown large, deep magma chamber below Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. The discovery offers new insight into the largely unknown internal plumbing of volcanoes, scientists at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science reported.
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