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Colorado mudslide: Astonishing footage shows miles of devastation
Los Angeles Times
VideoBrief After a day of aerial and ground searches, Colorado officials failed to find three men who vanished after a massive May 26 mudslide wiped out miles of uninhabited land on Grand Mesa, the largest flat-topped mountain in the world. The immense power and scope of the slide — which, according to rough estimates, could be as much as eight times larger than the landslide that killed at least 41 people in Snohomish County, Washington, in March — astonished Colorado officials who surveyed the area by air.
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US officials cut estimate of recoverable Monterey Shale oil by 96 percent
Los Angeles Times
Federal energy authorities have slashed by 96 percent the estimated amount of recoverable oil buried in California's vast Monterey Shale deposits, deflating its potential as a national "black gold mine" of petroleum. Just 600 million barrels of oil can be extracted with existing technology, far below the 13.7 billion barrels once thought recoverable from the jumbled layers of subterranean rock spread across much of Central California, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said.
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Physicists sound-out acoustic tractor beam
Medical Physics Web
An acoustic "tractor beam" that can pull an object by firing sound waves at it has been created by physicists in the U.K. and U.S. The beam was made using a commercial ultrasound surgery system and differs from previous tractor beams that use light. The researchers say their technique could be readily adapted for medical applications that manipulate objects or tissue within the body. Looking beyond medicine, acoustic tractor beams can move much larger objects than their optical counterparts, and so could prove useful for remote sampling for things such as environmental monitoring, geophysics, atmospheric testing and oceanic testing.
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AIPG NEWS


Successor announced: Robert A. Stewart, CPG-08332, AIPG Executive Director
AIPG
For the past 15 years we have had the same Executive Director — Bill Siok. Bill has provided leadership to AIPG that has reenergized members, developed new programs, fostered improved or new communications and professional relationships with geological organizations around the world, embraced young professionals and student members and spearheaded programs that have made and will continue to keep AIPG financially strong. These are efforts that we all appreciate. Bill is a team player and has worked closely with AIPG Presidents and Executive Committees, members and staff to be where we are today.

Bill let AIPG know last year that he would retire in 2014. Although Bill will officially leave AIPG at the end of June, he will continue to be a member of AIPG and a trustee of the Foundation of AIPG.

What next? An Executive Director Search Committee was formed in 2013 to look for a new Executive Director. The search has taken many months and I am pleased to let you know that Bob Stewart has been selected as the new Executive Director of AIPG. Bob is the Editor of TPG. Bob has been a CPG since 1991 and has served many roles for AIPG including an active member of the Northeast Section, National Editor of TPG, and member of the National Screening Committee. In 2011 Bob was awarded a Presidential Certificate of Merit for work as the Editor of TPG and in 2013 he was awarded the Martin van Couvering Memorial Award for service to AIPG. Bob will officially take over the reins at Headquarters on June 30. Let's all welcome Bob. Even though this transition marks a significant change for AIPG, I envisage this change to be seamless.

Raymond W. Talkington, CPG
AIPG 2014 President

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AIPG Section Leadership Award — Deadline May 31
AIPG
The AIPG Section Leadership Award was established by the Executive Committee in 2013 to recognize one or more of our members who have demonstrated a long-term commitment and have been long-term contributors to AIPG at the section level. The deadline for submittal of nominees for the AIPG Section Leadership Award is May 31 of each year.
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AIPG Student Chapter Award — Deadline June 30
AIPG
The purpose of the AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award is to recognize the most outstanding student chapter for their participation in, and contribution to, the AIPG. Submittals are due June 30 and awarded in the fall.
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Call for abstracts: 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference
AIPG
Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists and the Arizona Hydrological Society for the 2014 Water and Rocks, the Foundations of Life National Conference in Prescott, Arizona. Click here to submit an abstract online to be considered for a presentation or poster. Submissions are due by June 2. Abstracts must be in Word format, single spaced, in 12-point Times New Roman and should not exceed one page. No tables or pictures will be accepted. You will be notified by June 16 if your abstract has been accepted. Extended abstracts and full papers are welcome but not required. Please contact Cathy Duran with AIPG by email or phone (303-412-6205) or email if you have any additional questions. Click here for conference details.
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AIPG Quarterly Journal
AIPG
The Professional Geologist, April/May/June 2014E-article, is now available online. All past issues are available online as well.
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AIPG polo rapid-dry sport shirt
AIPG
Put the moisture-wicking secret weapon of this Rapid Dry™ technology to work for you. The fabric wicks moisture away from the body to the surface where it evaporates, keeping you comfortable and dry. This soft, breathable fabric is a superstar performer for any situation where you might need a little extra confidence and moisture protection. Available in a variety of colors and sizes. AIPG member price: $33.50, plus shipping.


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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
May 29 Aquifer Characterization — Groundwater Behavior in the Subsurface Environment, Lexington, Ky. Hosted by the AIPG Kentucky Section
June 1-4 48th U.S. Rock Mechanics Geomechanics Symposium: Rock Mechanics across Length and Time Scales, Minneapolis . ARMA
June 17-18 4th Annual Workshop on: The Groundwater/Surface Water Interface — Characterization, Evaluation and Compliance, Roscommon, Mich. Hosted by the AIPG Michigan Section
June 25-26 15th Annual Energy Exposition and Symposium, Billings, Mont. The Energy Exposition
Aug. 25-27 2014 Unconventional Resources Technology Conference, Denver URTeC
Aug. 28-Sept. 7 AWG 2014 Canadian Rockies Geology Field Trip, out of Calgary, Alberta, Canada Register here; contact Debbie Hanneman for more information
Sept. 13-16 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference Water & Rocks — the Foundations of Life, Prescott, Ariz. Register online
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section



FEATURED ARTICLE
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Cosmic collision created the Chelyabinsk meteor
NewScientist
The meteor that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia, last year was probably spat out during a collision between two much larger rocks more than 290 million years ago, according to new analysis of the meteor's composition. The meteor is thought to have been about 20 meters wide before it blew up in the atmosphere. Collectors and researchers have recovered a number of fragments in Chelyabinsk, allowing geologists to learn more about its origins.

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Expert: Shale is a US phenomenon
Fuel Fix
Shale drilling is an American phenomenon, and likely will stay that way for several more years, geopolitical strategist Peter Zeihan said in San Antonio. Zeihan, who spoke at South Texas Money Management's annual Energy Symposium at the San Antonio Country Club, said that no place else in the world has the combination the U.S. does — the capital, engineers, geologists, chemists, a legal system that recognizes mineral rights, pipelines, midstream infrastructure and a ready market.

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Evidence found of 'impact winter' after asteroid that killed dinosaurs
Los Angeles Times
Sixty-six million years ago, the massive Chicxulub asteroid slammed into Earth, setting off a chain of events that wiped out the dinosaurs and countless other species. For decades, scientists have tried to reconstruct the events immediately following the devastating impact to determine exactly why so much life was lost on land and in the oceans. While the impact was tremendous, it wasn't quite enough to have killed 70 percent of all life on Earth by itself. Now researchers say they have found a new piece of the puzzle

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Environmental group campaigns to stop Rutgers study of ocean floor
KYW-TV
Rutgers University scientists plan to explore the impact of sea level rise on the Jersey shore, with a month-long acoustic imaging project beginning June 3. Rutgers Geology professor Gregory Mountain is leading the team of researchers who want to learn more about a 240 square mile area that begins 15 miles off Long Beach Island, where they've previously found evidence of fluctuations in ocean levels. Environmental and fishermen's groups, however, are trying to stop the expedition.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Ocean Levels.


History shows that parched Aral Sea can be restored
NewScientist
In 1961, the Aral Sea in central Asia was the world's fourth largest lake. But massive irrigation programs begun during the Soviet era diverted water from the rivers that feed it, reducing the lake's volume to just 10 percent of what it was and leaving large areas dry. The ecosystem has collapsed, the desiccated lake bed is laced with pesticides that are spread by dust storms and drinking water is polluted. Now geologists have discovered that the Aral Sea has previously recovered naturally from such severe declines.
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Crater discovery's impact echoes still today
University of Western Ontario via Phys.org
Twenty years ago, the Desmond Moser first visited the heart of South Africa's Vredefort impact crater, locating what he believed to be some of the only remains of a magma sea created more than 2 billion years ago in a 300-kilometer-wide crater. He published his finding in 1997 in the journal Geology and awaited praise from peers. But it never came. To this day, detractors still think Moser is mistaken. But after a return trip in 2009, Moser believes he has the scientific evidence to prove his 20-year-old point.
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Petrified trees are window to Yellowstone's tropical past
Billings Gazette
There is a ghostly redwood forest in Yellowstone National Park. The trees are identical to the massive pines that grow 200 to 300 feet tall in California. The difference is that the Yellowstone redwoods are petrified, not alive. They range in size from broom handle width to 4 feet wide. Stripped of their limbs and most of their bark, the largest stand 40 feet tall, their roots locked in rock. Although now lifeless, the upright logs stand as testimony to a tropical time in Yellowstone's past — one that ended suddenly and violently.
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NASA chief dreams of sailing on Saturn's moon Titan
The Australian
A robotic rover has crawled across the Martian surface and a probe has been smashed into a comet at supersonic speed. Now NASA scientists are proposing another interplanetary first: sailing a boat on the methane lakes of Titan, Saturn's largest moon.
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Geologists look for evidence in 'Deadliest Earthquakes' on June 25
KENW-TV
In 2010, epic earthquakes all over the planet delivered one of the worst annual death tolls ever recorded. The deadliest strike was in Haiti, where a quake southwest of Port-au-Prince killed more than 200,000. In exclusive coverage, a NOVA camera crew follows a team of U.S. geologists as they enter Haiti in the immediate aftermath, hunting for crucial evidence that will help them determine what happened underground and what the risks are of a new killer quake.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    New sauropod 'the largest animal to have walked on Earth' (The Vancouver Sun)
Incredible map reveals how world looked during last ice age (Daily Mail)
New underwater volcano discovered in Hawaii (LiveScience via Yahoo)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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