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Oldest traces of life on Earth may not have been from ancient microbes afterall
LiveScience
What were thought to be some of the oldest traces of life on Earth may not have been caused by life at all, new research suggests. The fossils, tiny tubules etched into ancient rocks in South Africa, were initially thought to be formed by ancient bacteria boring through volcanic glass in the seafloor — a process called bioalteration — during the Archean Eon, about 3.4 billion years ago. But the new study suggests these tiny tunnels were actually formed by the cooling of the volcanic rock nearby, just 2.9 billion years ago.
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Geologists: Soft Rock, steep slope contributors in Colorado mudslide
KUNC-FM
The area where the Collbran, Colorado, mudslide happened has seen similar slides in the past. Geologists say relatively weak rock and steep terrain create a recipe for such natural disasters. Still, Colorado in general is less vulnerable to slides than wetter areas, like the West Coast.
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New report details more geoscience job opportunities than students
EurekAlert!
In the American Geosciences Institute's newest Status of the Geoscience Workforce Report, released May 2014, jobs requiring training in the geosciences continue to be lucrative and in-demand. Even with increased enrollment and graduation from geoscience programs, the data still project a shortage of around 135,000 geoscientists needed in the workforce by the end of the decade.
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See related story: Lake forming near landslide could break and rush towards Collbran, Colorado (KUSA-TV)


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Call for abstracts: 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference
AIPG
Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists and the Arizona Hydrological Society for the 2014 Water and Rocks, the Foundations of Life National Conference in Prescott, Arizona. Click here to submit an abstract online to be considered for a presentation or poster. The deadline for submissions has been extended to June 16. Abstracts must be in Word format, single spaced, in 12-point Times New Roman and should not exceed one page. No tables or pictures will be accepted. You will be notified by June 16 if your abstract has been accepted. Extended abstracts and full papers are welcome but not required. Please contact Cathy Duran with AIPG by email or phone (303-412-6205) or email if you have any additional questions. Click here for conference details.
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AIPG Student Chapter Award — Deadline June 30
AIPG
The purpose of the AIPG Student Chapter of the Year Award is to recognize the most outstanding student chapter for their participation in, and contribution to, the AIPG. Submittals are due June 30 and awarded in the fall.
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AIPG Student Chapter Annual Report — Eastern Illinois University
AIPG
Number of student members in chapter: 21.

Number of chapter meetings per year: 8*.

*The chapter was initiated on Jan. 13, 2014; this report only counts meetings this year during which we were officially a student chapter. The chapter is holding meetings every other Monday, so a complete year's worth of meetings will be 16 in the future. Click on the "Read More" link for an annual report that includes details and pictures.

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AIPG
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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
June 17-18 4th Annual Workshop on: The Groundwater/Surface Water Interface — Characterization, Evaluation and Compliance, Roscommon, Mich. Hosted by the AIPG Michigan Section
June 25-26 15th Annual Energy Exposition and Symposium, Billings, Mont. The Energy Exposition
Aug. 25-27 2014 Unconventional Resources Technology Conference, Denver URTeC
Aug. 28-Sept. 7 AWG 2014 Canadian Rockies Geology Field Trip, out of Calgary, Alberta, Canada Register here; contact Debbie Hanneman for more information
Sept. 13-16 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference Water & Rocks — the Foundations of Life, Prescott, Ariz. Register online
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section



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Geologists: Giant Mars volcano may have had habitable environment
International Business Times
Scientists have uncovered the eruption of the huge Martian volcano that was once covered in glacial ice, which may have contributed in the creation of large lakes on the surface of the red planet. Based on a new study, these scientists believe that the Martian volcano may have once had a habitable environment.

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Cosmic collision created the Chelyabinsk meteor
NewScientist
The meteor that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia, last year was probably spat out during a collision between two much larger rocks more than 290 million years ago, according to new analysis of the meteor's composition. The meteor is thought to have been about 20 meters wide before it blew up in the atmosphere. Collectors and researchers have recovered a number of fragments in Chelyabinsk, allowing geologists to learn more about its origins.

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Colorado mudslide: Astonishing footage shows miles of devastation
Los Angeles Times
After a day of aerial and ground searches, Colorado officials failed to find three men who vanished after a massive May 26 mudslide wiped out miles of uninhabited land on Grand Mesa, the largest flat-topped mountain in the world. The immense power and scope of the slide astonished Colorado officials who surveyed the area by air.

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Study: Megaquakes frequent in Japan history
The Wall Street Journal
At least 16 mega-earthquakes originated in the Pacific coast off Shikoku over the last 7,000 years and could have caused damage on a par with the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, according to a study by Kochi University Prof. Makoto Okamura. The study of local tsunami deposits supports earlier research suggesting that a major earthquake has hit Japan's southwest region about once every 300 to 350 years, Prof. Okamura said.
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Antarctic ice-sheet less stable than previously assumed
University of Hawaii System
The first evidence for massive and abrupt iceberg calving in Antarctica, dating back 19,000 to 9,000 years ago, has now been documented by an international team of geologists and climate scientists, including University of Hawaii at Mānoa Professor Axel Timmermann. The study, "Millennial-scale variability in Antarctic ice-sheet discharge during the last deglaciation," in the May 28, 2014 issue of Nature bears witness to an unstable Antarctic ice sheet that can abruptly reorganize Southern Hemisphere climate and cause rapid global sea level rise.
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Where have all the craters gone?
Science 2.0
Impact craters reveal one of the most spectacular geologic process known to man. During the past 3.5 billion years, it is estimated that more than 80 bodies, larger than the dinosaur-killing asteroid that struck the Yucatan Peninsula 66 million years ago, have bombarded Earth. However, tectonic processes, weathering and burial quickly obscure or destroy craters. For example, if the Earth weren't so dynamic, its surface would be heavily cratered like the Moon or Mercury.
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Nevada's Chainman shale shows exploration potential
OIL & Gas Journal
The fold and thrust belt play that extends through eastern Nevada and western Utah remains largely underexplored. Given its enormous area, there is potential for a subset of the fold and thrust belt play that includes surface anticlines of eastern Nevada.
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A site investigation or injection / remediation project requires safe & effective implementation. Geo Lab has the tools, capabilities & experience to do that. Click here for more...
 


The world's deepest hole lies hidden beneath a rusty metal cap in Russia
Mother Nature Network
Beneath a rusty old metal cap lies some of our world's deepest mysteries. Though it measures just nine inches in diameter, the hole beneath the cap extends 40,230 feet under the Earth, or 7.5 miles. That's roughly a third of the way through the Baltic continental crust. It's the deepest borehole in the world. Before the Kola Superdeep Borehole was drilled, geologists could only hypothesize about the composition of the Earth's crust. Needless to say, the amount of geological data produced by the project was unprecedented.
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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
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Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

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VIMS scientist uses underwater gliders to study the Virginia coast
Daily Press
A quarter-century ago, American oceanographer Henry Stommel imagined a world where thousands of autonomous underwater robots roamed the seas, collecting masses of vital raw data for scientists who sat snug on dry land. Stommel died in 1992, long before he could see his vision realized. But on May 25, physical oceanographer Donglai Gong of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science acknowledged Stommel as he prepared to deploy an autonomous underwater robot in the York River in a public demonstration of this growing technology.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    US officials cut estimate of recoverable Monterey Shale oil by 96 percent (Los Angeles Times)
Physicists sound-out acoustic tractor beam (Medical Physics Web)
Environmental group campaigns to stop Rutgers study of ocean floor (KYW-TV)
Petrified trees are window to Yellowstone's tropical past (Billings Gazette)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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