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New evidence of Earth's deep water cycle reveals a virtual buried ocean
KQED
Water is part of Earth's very definition as a planet. Clouds of water fill its atmosphere, oceans cover most of its surface, and groundwater is found everywhere underground. For the last century, geologists have been tracing the influence of water deeper and deeper into Earth’s interior. During the last year, whole oceans worth of water have been found in the mantle, hundreds of kilometers below the crust. And a paper in in June 12 issue of Science traces water's influence all the way down to the top of Earth's lower mantle.
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Scientists smash crystals and determine moon is older than previously thought
Los Angeles Times
The violent impact that created our moon may have occurred millions of years earlier than previously thought, according to new research. Previously, it was suggested that this massive impact occurred 100 million years after the solar system formed. However, after smashing open ancient quartz crystals that date as far back as 2.7 billion and 3.4 billion years, researchers say that the impact probably occurred a mere 40 million years after the start of the solar system.
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Geologists confirm oxygen levels in Earth's oldest oceans
Science World Report
In a new study, geologists used a novel approach to study the level of oxygen in Earth's oldest oceans. The new research offers crucial implications for the study of marine ecology as well as warming of the planet. The research used a new technique called iodine geochemistry to confirm the initial appearance of dissolved oxygen in the surface waters of the ocean.
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Early registration ends June 30 — Save $50
AIPG
Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists and the Arizona Hydrological Society for the 2014 Water and Rocks, the Foundations of Life National Conference in Prescott, Arizona. Click here for conference details. Registration is open.
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Louisiana licensing — Deadline extended
Louisiana Board of Professional Geoscientists
The State of Louisiana licensing board for geoscientists has extended the deadline for grandfathering provision to Dec. 31.
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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
Silent Auction — Sept. 15 at AIPG Awards Dinner
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists will hold a silent auction at the AIPG annual meeting awards dinner and social function at 6 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 15, at the Prescott Resort and Conference Center. Winning bids will be determined at the end of the evening dinner function, at about 8:30 pm. We hope you will consider a donation to the silent auction to raise funds in support of the Foundation for AIPG programs, scholarships, internships and various initiatives. Please complete the form with information about your donations (such as mineral/rock specimens, books, antiques or historic items, artwork, jewelry, maps, stay at a vacation home and other things geologic).

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AIPG hats available
AIPG
Baseball Hat — AIPG's baseball cap has a velcro enclosure and embroidered lettering. Available colors: black, royal blue, tan, white, navy

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
June 17-18 4th Annual Workshop on: The Groundwater/Surface Water Interface — Characterization, Evaluation and Compliance, Roscommon, Mich. Hosted by the AIPG Michigan Section
June 25-26 15th Annual Energy Exposition and Symposium, Billings, Mont. The Energy Exposition
Aug. 25-27 2014 Unconventional Resources Technology Conference, Denver URTeC
Aug. 28-Sept. 7 AWG 2014 Canadian Rockies Geology Field Trip, out of Calgary, Alberta, Canada Register here; contact Debbie Hanneman for more information
Sept. 13-16 2014 AIPG/AHS National Conference Water & Rocks — the Foundations of Life, Prescott, Ariz. Register online
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section



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Tiny fish may be ancestor of nearly all living vertebrates
LiveScience
A stunningly preserved, soft-bodied fish that is more than 500 million years old could be the ancestor of almost all living vertebrates. The fossilized fish, called Metaspriggina, sports characteristic gill structures that later evolved into jawbones in jawed vertebrates, according to a new study.

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New report details more geoscience job opportunities than students
EurekAlert!
In the American Geosciences Institute's newest Status of the Geoscience Workforce Report, released May 2014, jobs requiring training in the geosciences continue to be lucrative and in-demand. Even with increased enrollment and graduation from geoscience programs, the data still project a shortage of around 135,000 geoscientists needed in the workforce by the end of the decade.

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June 6, 1944: The geology of D-Day
Scientific American
While planning for D-Day, geology was a consideration, as aerial photographs of the shores of Normandy were studied to find suitable landing sites for the invasion. In January 1944, British divers risked their lives to collect samples from selected sites; geologists had to determine if the sandy shores could support the heavy equipment and modified tanks needed to overrun the local German coastal fortifications.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Earth's oldest rocks hold essential ingredient for life
LiveScience via Fox News
A critical building block for creating the first life on Earth was found in 3.8-billion-year-old rocks from Isua, Greenland, researchers reported at the annual Goldschmidt geochemistry conference. For the first time, rich concentrations of the element boron have been found in Isua's ancient marine rocks. The discovery signals that boron was circulating in seawater and was absorbed by marine clays, which eventually became tourmaline.
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Hydrothermal vents could explain chemical precursors to life
Astrobio.net via Phys.org
Roy Price first heard about the hydrothermal vents in New Caledonia's Bay of Prony a decade ago. Being a scuba diver and a geologist, he was fascinated by the pictures of a 38-meter-high calcite "chimney" that had precipitated out of the highly-alkaline vent fluid. His attraction to this South Pacific site intensified over the years, as it was later revealed that the geochemistry of the hydrothermal fluids discharging in the Bay of Prony resemble that of the mid-Atlantic's "Lost City," one of the most spectacular of all hydrothermal vent systems.
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Scientists: Meteor strike caused a mass extinction nearly 35 million years ago
KOVR-TV
A meteor that crashed into what is now remote Siberia nearly destroyed all life on Earth around 35 million years ago. That theory was presented at the Californian Goldschmidt geochemistry conference underway at the Sacramento Convention Center. The Popigai crater is the 10th largest meteor impact site in the world. It had been off limits to scientists until after the fall of the Soviet Union, largely because of rare diamonds found on the site that were created by the sheer force of the meteor slamming into graphite material in the soil.
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Study: Tibetan Plateau served as cradle of evolution for cold-adapted mammals
Zee News
A new study suggests that the advance and retreat of the ice sheets millions of years ago had a profound influence in the evolution and geographic distribution of many animals, including those that live today in the Arctic regions.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Antarctic region home to rare minerals becomes 'protected area' (Blue & Green Tomorrow)
Louisiana licensing — Deadline extended (Louisiana Board of Professional Geoscientists)
Geologists discover large underground rivers off Ireland's Galway Bay and the Aran Islands (Galway Advertiser)
How new tech for ancient fossils could change the way we understand animals (Smithsonian)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Why Earth's most abundant mineral just got its name
Gizmodo
It sounds weird, but the most abundant mineral on Earth finally got a name, thanks to a century-old meteorite. There were a whole confluence of reasons it took bridgmanite so long to get its name. The mineral formerly referred to as a silicate perovskite only exists at the high temperatures and pressures of the Earth's lower mantle, where no human or drill dares to go. That's about 400 to 1,800 miles below the Earth's surface. Although lab tests and models pointed toward its existence, geologists have never been able to see bridgmanite or characterize its structure.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Mantle.


Solomon Islands nickel ore legal fight nears decision
Reuters
A court ruling in the Solomon Islands may finally unlock a large nickel deposit that geologists have known about for half a century but have been unable to exploit because of ownership changes and legal wrangling. Japanese giant Sumitomo Metal Mining and tiny Australian explorer Axiom Mining are fighting over the Isabel nickel laterite discovery and will submit final arguments to the Solomon Islands High Court on June 23, following a court case that has already run for 88 days.
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