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Geologic conundrums
Science Codex
These 10 new Geology articles confront geologic conundrums and capture evidence toward answering even the most difficult questions on topics such as strain localization; atmospheric CO2; ultra-high pressure metamorphism; white chalk cliffs; lithospheric dripping; retreating trenches; microbial diversity beneath glaciers and ice-sheets; salt-marsh ecosystems; New Zealand glaciers — biggest well before Europe's Little Ice Age; rock mechanics; tsunami hazards; and tracking the impact of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake.
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Geologists find fault system that could be first signs of future supercontinent
Wired UK
A new active fault system has been discovered off the coast of Portugal, which scientists believe could be the first signs of an eventual convergence of the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates.
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Ocean temps highest in 150 years
The Daily Times
A recent study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Northeast Fisheries Science Center showed sea surface temperatures in the northeast shelf — which ranges from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras, N.C. — for 2012 were the highest in 150 years.
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AIPG NEWS


Come join us for the AIPG 50th Annual Meeting
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists' 50th Annual Meeting, "Geology Serving Society: Energy Independence, Mineral and Water Resources, and Geologic Education," will be Oct. 23-26 in Broomfield, Colo. This conference is designed to exploit Colorado's unique geologic setting. Ten field trips have been organized — with of one them venturing underground — plus several guest trips and a short course. Register now.
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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to:
  • Make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences
  • Prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety
  • Make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids
  • Support development of education programs for the science and engineering community
  • Support geoscience internships in the nation’s capital
  • Support geological filed trips for K-12
  • Support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.
For further information or if you have questions about donating to the Foundation, contact John Bognar, Chairman, The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists at 314-660-9968 or John.bognar@geosciencesolutions.net.

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AIPG silent auction
AIPG
A silent auction to benefit the AIPG Foundation will be held in conjunction with the 2013 Annual Meeting in Broomfield, Colo. Please donate any interesting books, specimens, geological memorabilia, etc. to this auction. Donors will be able to deduct the value of the items they donate and purchasers will be able to deduct their purchases because the AIPG Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Click here for more details or contact the office at 303-412-6205 or aipg@aipg.org.
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AIPG 2013 National Award recipients
AIPG
The AIPG National Awards will be presented at the AIPG 50th Anniversary meeting on the evening of Oct. 24 at the Omni Hotel in Broomfield, Colo.

Martin Van Couvering Memorial Award: Robert A. Stewart, CPG-08332, Avon, Conn.
Ben H. Parker Memorial Medal: Jonathan G. Price, CPG-07814, Reno, Nev.
John T. Galey, Sr. Memorial Public Service Award: Scott W. Tinker, CPG-10564, Austin, Texas
Award of Honorary Membership: William J. Siok, CPG-04773, Thornton, Colo.

Congratulations!

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AIPG booth

AIPG will have a booth at the following meetings this year. If you are attending any of these meetings please stop by and say hello or if you would like to volunteer to help staff the booth please contact the office at 303-412-6205 or aipg@aipg.org.

Aug. 12-14 — URTeC, Denver, Colo.
Aug. 12-15 — NCSL, Atlanta, Ga.
Oct. 27-30 — GSA, Denver, Colo.
Feb. 23-26, 2014 — SME, Salt Lake City, Utah

We look forward to seeing you!

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2013 AIPG Student Scholarship winners
AIPG
The AIPG Executive Committee is pleased to announce the awardees for the 2013 Student Scholarships. AIPG has awarded eleven scholarships this year. The recipients are Douglas Mateas, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, Ill.; Joseph Cleveland, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; Lakin Beal, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho; Justin Mauck, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, Kingsville, Texas; Jessica Eicher, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska; Kristopher Ashton, East Carolina University, Greenville, N.C.; Kase Knochenhauer, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, Mich.; Lisa Whalen, Virginia Tech, Blackburg, Va.; Ali Sherman, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; Victor Perez, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; and Karl Campbell, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, Mich. Click here to read the students essays.

The scholarships are made possible by the support of the Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists and the AIPG members’ voluntary contributions.

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Vote
AIPG
AIPG members still have time to vote for the AIPG 2014 National Officers. You can vote online, mail or fax it in (paper ballot). Only active AIPG members with the designation of CPG, Professional Member or Young Professional Member are authorized to vote. Ballots will only be valid if the voters name and AIPG number are included. This information will be validated to ensure eligibility.


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INDUSTRY NEWS


Global cooling as significant as global warming
Research & Development
A "cold snap" 116 million years ago triggered a similar marine ecosystem crisis to the ones witnessed in the past as a result of global warming, according to research published in Nature Geoscience. The international study confirms the link between global cooling and a crash in the marine ecosystem during the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse period. It also quantifies, for the first time, the amplitude and duration of the temperature change.
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Oxygen once flowed freely on Mars, NASA rover discovers as search for water continues
Medical Daily
As Americans and the world prepare to send manned missions to Mars this century, scientists are glimpsing tantalizing clues about the possibility of past and present life on our closest solar neighbor, the Red Planet. Today, scientists are able to compare the petrology of material from meteorites on earth to rocks collected by NASA's Spirit rover. By comparing samples collected by the rover, researchers say the planet's atmosphere was suffused with oxygen some 4 billion years ago.
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Targeting 4 pollutants could reduce sea level rise
Science World Report
The U.S. National Research Council projects that sea levels will rise by up to a meter (20-39 inches) by 2100, specifically due to human-caused increases in greenhouse gases. However, a new study indicates that cutting four kinds of emissions — methane, tropospheric ozone, hydrofluorocarbons and black carbon — could reduce the warming trend by 25 to 50 percent by 2050.
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Mapping the world's largest volcano
Big Island Video News
Cartography, the art or science of making maps, is alive and well at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Visualizing the dynamic three-dimensional geologic history of the island on a two-dimensional sheet of paper is no easy task, but it is one of the fundamental responsibilities of HVO. Improving the geologic map of Hawaii Island is an ongoing goal of HVO. A combination of remote sensing and field-based techniques are currently utilized to map the geology of the volcanoes.
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Roots of geothermal systems researched in Iceland
News of Iceland
The aim of the project, titled "Deep Roots of Geothermal Systems" (DRG), is to understand the relationship of water and magma in the roots of volcanoes and how heat is transferred into geothermal systems to maintain their energy. Furthermore, the design of wells and well heads for high temperatures will be a focus of the project, as will methods for utilizing superheated steam from greater depths.
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Geologist admits tasting ancient water
CNN via WPTZ-TV
If you discovered water that could be millions or billions of years old, would you taste it? Barbara Sherwood Lollar does it all the time. She's a geologist in the department of Earth Sciences at the University of Toronto, and collaborated with other researchers on analyzing water found in a Canadian mine in Timmins, Ontario. They published the findings in the journal Nature in May, showing that the water is between 1.5 and 2.6 billion years old — meaning it has been totally isolated for that long.
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Scientists gain more understanding about creation of Arkansas' diamonds
Magnolia Reporter
Many visitors wonder why Crater of Diamonds State Park in southwest Arkansas is a place where diamonds have been found and mined for the past 107 years. The answer is fairly simple — you will only find diamonds within a volcano eruption. Yes, with the exception of some meteor craters, diamonds are always associated with volcanic rocks. Geologists in recent years have been working on this question, and believe that they have the answers.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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