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Smithsonian discovers new mammal species
USA Today
VideoBriefSmithsonian zoologists announced the discovery of the first new species of carnivore found in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years — the big-eyed, furry, rust-colored olinguito. A small member of the raccoon family, the olinguito lives in the treetops of the Andes Mountains.
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Atlantic subduction could lead to more quakes
Gainesville Times
Conventional knowledge of plate tectonics has the North American continent drifting away from Europe and Africa as a solid plate, riding on half-molten rock. The resulting gap in the center of the Atlantic Ocean gets filled with fresh lava. But recent research identifies a new subduction zone forming between Africa and Portugal.
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Transboundary aquifers feel the strain
Environmental Research Web
Internationally shared aquifers are under increasing pressure, according to the first worldwide view of groundwater stress on the resources. Thirty-one transboundary aquifers are currently stressed due to human overexploitation. Meanwhile, stress on other aquifers has been increasing "at an alarming rate" for the past 50 years due to groundwater abstraction for food production.
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  Midwest GeoSciences Aquifer Testing Workshop

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AIPG NEWS


Volunteers needed to staff booth
AIPG
AIPG has the opportunity to exhibit at the 2013 GCAGS Convention, Oct. 6-8, in New Orleans. AIPG National needs member support for setting up the booth and staffing on exhibitor days. If you are interested in helping with the booth, please respond to aipg@aipg.org or call Vickie Hill at AIPG National Headquarters at 303-412-6205 by Aug. 23.
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AIPG baseball cap
AIPG
AIPG's baseball cap has a velcro enclosure and embroidered lettering. Available colors: black, royal blue, tan, white and navy.

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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological filed trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.
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Welcome to the AIPG Job Board
AIPG
This area was constructed to help connect AIPG members and website users with new employment opportunities. Use this tool to guide you as you begin your job search. Employers and recruiters: You now have access to our specialized niche of geology professionals. Browse our resumes or post your own opportunity.
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Register for the AIPG 50th Annual Meeting
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists' 50th Annual Meeting, "Geology Serving Society: Energy Independence, Mineral and Water Resources, and Geologic Education," will be Oct. 23-26, in Broomfield, Colo. This conference is designed to exploit Colorado's unique geologic setting. Ten field trips have been organized — with of one them venturing underground — plus several guest trips and a short course. Register now.
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AIPG silent auction
AIPG
A silent auction to benefit the AIPG Foundation will be held in conjunction with the 2013 Annual Meeting in Broomfield, Colo. Please donate any interesting books, specimens, geological memorabilia, etc. to this auction. Donors will be able to deduct the value of the items they donate and purchasers will be able to deduct their purchases because the AIPG Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Click here for more details or contact the office at 303-412-6205 or aipg@aipg.org.
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AIPG Executive Director search
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists has initiated a search for an Executive Director to succeed the current Director who will retire in 2014. AIPG is a professional geoscience society with a membership of nearly 7,000 and a dedicated staff of seven at its headquarters in Thornton, Colo.
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Asteroid impact may have triggered evolution of Earth's multicellular life
The Daily Galaxy
A massive asteroid that struck South Australia during a glacial cold snap 590 million years ago may have triggered the evolution of Earth's earliest complex organisms, Australian geologists reported. In 2010, researchers argued that the Acraman asteroid impact coincided with an extensive glaciation period more than 500 million years ago and created ideal conditions for an explosion of complex organisms, known as the Ediacara biota.

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New Mediterranean ecosystem to be explored

Aug. 12 marked the launch of Oceana's 2013 Mediterranean Expedition, which is bound for the Emile Baudot escarpment — a large rocky wall to the south of the Balearic archipelago, of which nothing about its ecosystem is known. A team of scientists, technicians and videographers from Oceana will spend 10 days studying this geological formation, which lounges the southern tip of Cabrera National Park.

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Earth's 100,000-year Ice Age cycle decoded
PTI via Money Control
Scientists have explained a new mechanism behind Earth's 100,000-year Ice Age cycle that points to the alternating influence of continental ice sheets and climate on this global climatic interchange. Science has struggled to explain fully why an ice age occurs every 100,000 years. As researchers now demonstrate based on a computer simulation, not only do variations in insolation play a key role, but also the mutual influence of glaciated continents and climate.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Earthquake shakes Hawaii
Live Science
A deep magnitude-4.8 earthquake rattled Hawaii on Aug. 11. The earthquake struck 5 miles south of Kilauea volcano's summit at 5:54 a.m. Hawaii Standard Time. Several aftershocks followed, the largest of which was a magnitude 3.4. Residents of Hawaii and Maui reported feeling weak to light shaking on the U.S. Geological Survey's "Did You Feel It?" online survey form.
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Florida geologists to map state for sinkholes
WTSP-TV
The sudden formation of a sinkhole near Disney World, which swallowed part of a hotel building, gives new urgency to a plan to map the entire state of Florida showing exactly where sinkholes are most likely to open up. The federal government is giving Florida $1 million to find out which areas are most vulnerable to sinkholes.
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3 species of dinosaurs reduced to 1
Discovery News
Just when you thought dinosaurs couldn't get any more extinct, two species have been erased from existence. According to a new analysis of dinosaur fossils by University of Pennsylvania researchers, specimens once thought part of three distinct species of the genus Psittacosaurus all derive from a single species. The case of mistaken identity arose not from the anatomical variety among different animals, but rather the differences in how the fossil remains of each were buried and compressed.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Geologists: US could store 500 years of CO2 (MSN News)
AIPG Career Center (AIPG)
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Northern Ireland's very own Jurassic Coast (Belfast Telegraph)
California seafloor mapping reveals hidden treasures (U.S. Geological Survey via Science Codex)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Shell 3-D Visualization Lab offers detailed views on energy-related research
University of Wyoming
For academics, students, engineers, oil and gas drillers, geologists and other scientists, the new Shell 3-D Visualization Lab in the University of Wyoming's Energy Innovation Center has the ability to image detailed 3-D models of land surfaces, the subsurface, molecules and more — a view that allows these entities to share the same frame of reference.
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Psychedelic rock: Wildly colorful geologic maps of national parks
Wired
One of the reasons Betsy Mason became a geologist was geologic maps. "I will never have enough walls in my house for all the geologic maps I'd love to hang," Mason writes. "But these maps are also full of information about the surface of the Earth, with hints of what is below and what came before."
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Maps.


Autonomous ocean gliders improve environmental studies
The Battalion
Though 70 percent of the Earth's surface is covered by oceans, 95 percent of these waters are currently unexplored, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Researchers at Texas A&M are working to discover more about these murky depths with new unmanned, missile-shaped Slocum gliders.
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