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TES satellite instrument gives new insight into water cycle
Phys.org
Research using NASA satellite measurements has given scientists a better understanding of what happens to rain and snow that falls on land—how much runs off into rivers, lakes and aquifers; how much plants use; and how much simply evaporates. Among the new findings: plants around the world use less water than previous studies had indicated, and most freshwater passes more rapidly through soil than previously thought, with less exposure to the nutrients and contaminants contained there.
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Denali's digits: North America's tallest peak 'shrinks' by 10 feet
Live Science
Denali — the tallest peak in North America — not only has a new name (or, more accurately, its old name), but a new official height, geologists announced Sept. 2. The Alaskan mountain had been called Mount McKinley until Aug. 30, when Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell said it would officially be given its former name — Denali, which translates to "the tall one." But "the tall one" is not quite as tall, it seems, as geologists once thought.
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Hidden oasis of oxygen suggests life took first breath in lakes
New Scientist
Where did life take its first, oxygen-rich breath? An important clue has been discovered at the bottom of an Antarctic lake, in an environment that gives us a sense of the conditions on Earth billions of years ago.
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AIPG 52nd Annual Conference: Download the conference app
AIPG
On your smart phone go to the App Store, download Whova and then search for AIPG. The app allows you to plan your schedule by selecting the presentations and events you want to attend, connect with other attendees, upload and view photos, receive announcements and much more! Register for AIPG's 52nd Annual Conference, "Fire & Ice," Sept. 19-22, in Anchorage, Alaska. Register online or use the registration form. The presentation schedule is online.

The AIPG Awards Luncheon, Sept. 18, will include the presentation of AIPG Student Chapter Award, AIPG Section Leadership Awards, AIPG Presidential Certificates of Merit and AIPG National Executive Committee Officer Recognition Awards. All registrants are welcome and encouraged to attend. Lunch is complimentary to registrants.

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AIPG members — 2016 membership dues
AIPG
The 2016 membership dues are available to pay online. Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1 in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2016. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on MEMBER LOGIN to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
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AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG
  • The Northeast Section Newsletter — Summer 2015
  • The AIPG Wisconsin Section Newsletter — Fall 2015
  • The AIPG Illinios-Indiana Section Newsletter — Summer 2015
  • The AIPG Ohio Section Newsletter — August 2015
  • The AIPG Texas Section Newsletter — July 2015
  • The AIPG Michigan Section Newsletter — July 2015

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    AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist is now available online
    AIPG
    The AIPG quarterly journal, The Professional Geologist, July/August/Sept. 2015 — new digital version or pdf — includes Career Building Workshop at UC Davis a Success; Earthquakes of Mexico-As Observed from Home Seismometer in Palmer, Texas; Career Building Workshop at UC Davis a Success; From Bone Dry to Soaking Wet-A Commentary on Recent Flooding Throughout Texas plus much more! All back issues of TPG are available online.
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    22nd International Petroleum Environmental Conference (IPEC): Nov. 17-19 in Denver
    University of Tulsa
    IPEC brings together professionals involved in developing and implementing technology to address and resolve E&P environmental problems. It provides a forum to share best practices and information regarding advances in emerging technology which address oil and gas environmental issues. Contact the University of Tulsa, Continuing Education for Science & Engineering for additional information about the conference and the discounted registration fee offered to AIPG members! Phone: 918-631-3088; Email: cese@utulsa.edu.
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    AIPG executive director position announcement
    AIPG
    The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The position is to be filled as soon as a qualified candidate is vetted. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
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    MARK YOUR CALENDAR

    Date Event More Information
    Sept. 19-22 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section
    Sept. 29-30 AIPG Georgia Section: "Innovative Environmental Assessment of Remediation Technology Kennesaw, Georgia
    Dec. 9 AIPG New England Aquifers: Elusive and Complex Conference Marlborough, Massachusetts
    Dec. 16 AIPG New England Aquifers: Elusive and Complex Conference Glastonbury, Connecticut
    April 5-6, 2016 AIPG Water Resources Unplugged Conference Orlando, Florida
    Sept. 9-13, 2016 AIPG 2016 National Conference Santa Fe, New Mexico


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    AIPG
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    AIPG sweatshirt
    AIPG
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    AIPG polar fleece 1/4-zip pullover
    AIPG
    This polar fleece is soft, warm, and comfortable year around with a 1/4 zip pullover jacket with elastic waist and cuffs. Embroidered AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold.


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    INDUSTRY NEWS


    Geologists say large amount of gold and silver may be hidden near volcanoes
    Tech Times
    Heated magma plumes and water have caused gold and silver to come about from melted rocks along a volcanic zone in New Zealand, according to a new research. Geologists from the University of Utah conducted a five-year study to test mineral deposits along the Taupo Volcanic Zone and found gold and silver deposits waiting to be discovered.
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    Earthquake, tsunami preparation advice offered by Japan
    The Spokesman-Review
    Japan will help Washington state prepare for "the big one" — a possible rupture of a geologic fault along the Pacific Coast that would cause a massive earthquake and tsunami. Gov. Jay Inslee, who is in the middle of a trade mission to Japan and South Korea, said he met with government officials in Kobe, the site of a massive quake in 1995 that killed more than 6,000 people, and visited the Disaster Reduction and Human Renovation Institution in that city.
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    Distant rocky planets' interiors may be far different than Earth
    redOrbit
    Rocky planets orbiting distant stars may not necessarily have the same basic type of chemical or mineral composition as Earth, researchers from the Carnegie Institute of Science, the University of Chicago and Stony Brook University claim in a recently published study. The researchers demonstrated that the interiors of these far-off worlds may have different magnesium compounds than those commonly found on our home planet.
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    Scientists want to unravel mysteries behind Britain's 'Atlantis'
    Tech Times
    Geoscientists from U.K. institutions including the University of St. Andrews and the University of Bradford are set to work on unraveling the mysteries surrounding what may be considered Atlantis, or an ancient landscape tucked beneath the North Sea. In the past, a country about the size of Ireland, called Doggerland, had sunk down the sea as climate change ensued following the last Ice Age.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Catastrophic volcanoes blamed for Earth's biggest extinction (Live Science)
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    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




    Meet the scorpion's prehistoric, bigger, badder cousin
    CNN
    Scientists are marveling at the world's oldest sea scorpion — the Pentecopterus, named after a Greek warship. Imagine a creature nearly six feet in length, with a long head, a narrow body and large limbs for grasping and trapping prey. It was part of the eurypterid family, a group of ancient creatures that are the ancestors of modern spiders, lobsters and ticks.
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    New clam species from Canada's Atlantic Coast described
    The Fish Site
    Canadian scientists have described a new species of giant file clam, originally collected from deep waters off Newfoundland 30 years ago. The scientific paper, published in the journal Zootaxa, is co-authored by researchers with the Canadian Museum of Nature and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Bedford Institute of Oceanography).
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    Geologists plan to study Doty Fault Line in Washington state
    The Chronicle
    In a dimmed room in front of a slideshow presentation with an audience primarily made up of Lewis County, Washington, fire chiefs, a geologist said a fault line between Centralia and Chehalis that has been researched very little crosses Interstate 5. It is actually unknown whether or not the Doty Fault is active. Plans are underway to study this more intensively. If active, it's a fault that would be capable of an earthquake between 6 1/2 and 7 magnitude.
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