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Mount McKinley is now 83 feet shorter
The Inquisitr
Mount McKinley is now 83 feet shorter. The mountain isn't shrinking. Researchers just have better technology now and can get a more accurate read on North America's tallest mountain. Geologists measured Mount McKinley at 20,320 feet tall back in 1952 with the use of photogrammetry. The U.S. Geological Survey revised the height to 20,237 feet tall with the help of a statewide digital mapping initiative and a new radar system.
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Rediscovery of rare mineral deposit by WMU geologists and private company could boost Michigan economy
MLive
Western Michigan University's Michigan Geological Repository for Research and Education, working in conjunction with the company Michigan Potash, said that it has rediscovered a mineral deposit in West Michigan potentially worth billions of dollars that could establish Michigan as a leading U.S. supplier of a key fertilizer used by farmers worldwide.
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Meteorite minerals offer clues to Earth extinctions, climate change
Space.com via NBC News
A huge asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs may not have been the only cosmic event to cause mass extinctions or change Earth's climate. Tiny minerals left over from many smaller meteorites could provide the geological evidence needed to show how rocks falling from the sky changed the course of life's evolution on our planet more than just once.
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AIPG NEWS


Register for the AIPG 50th Annual Meeting
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists' 50th Annual Meeting, "Geology Serving Society: Energy Independence, Mineral and Water Resources, and Geologic Education," will be Oct. 23-26, in Broomfield, Colo. This conference is designed to exploit Colorado's unique geologic setting. Ten field trips have been organized — with of one them venturing underground — plus several guest trips and a short course. Register by Sept. 23 to take advantage of the early bird discount.

The meeting and its events will not be impacted by the flooding. Roads from the airport to the Omni Hotel, where the meeting is being held, are all open. Field trips will still be held as planned.

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AIPG Executive Director search
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists has initiated a search for an Executive Director to succeed the current Director who will retire in 2014. AIPG is a professional geoscience society with a membership of nearly 7,000 and a dedicated staff of seven at its headquarters in Thornton, Colo. The deadline for applications is Oct. 1.
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AIPG polar fleece vest available
AIPG
Ready for layering, this super soft fleece vest offers great warmth at a great price. It is embroidered with AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold. Available colors: black, navy, grey heather, royal, charcoal, midnight heather and red.


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AIPG section newsletters
AIPG
The following AIPG section newsletters are now available online:
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Scientists studying solar radiation management as a way to cool planet
Richmond Times-Dispatch
The 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo, a volcano in the Philippines, blasted enough fine particles and sulfur dioxide gas into the atmosphere to envelop the Earth in a high-altitude cloud for the better part of two months. In 1992, scientists determined the cloud had deflected enough sunlight to cool the planet by about 1 degree. Now, some experts wonder whether the time may have come to deliberately attempt such "solar radiation management."

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Scientists developed a new tool to pinpoint oil reserves
The Economic Times
Scientists have developed a new tool that can precisely pinpoint where petroleum and gas reserves have accumulated. The tool is a new index that provides a better understanding of how oil travels from where it was formed to where it has collected. The index could aid in the discovery of new oil resources, while reducing the environmental impact of accessing those resources, researchers said.

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Geologists find the world's biggest volcano is on the floor of the Pacific
Agence France-Presse via The Raw Story
Geologists recently announced they had uncovered a stupendous volcano that is the biggest in the world and rivals the greatest in the Solar System. Dubbed Tamu Massif, the volcano is part of the Shatsky Rise, a deep plateau on the floor of the Pacific located around 1,000 miles east of Japan, they said. It comprises a single, immense, rounded dome in the shape of a shield, formed of hardened lava from an eruption around 144 million years ago.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Hotspot scorched Midwest, leaving legacy of earthquakes, rare rocks
LiveScience
A seismic speed trap that stretches from Missouri to Virginia suggests a hotspot scorched the Midwest during the Mesozoic Era, a new study finds. Hotspots are scalding plumes of hot rock rising toward Earth's surface from the mantle, the layer that sits under Earth's crust. When continents trundle across hotspots, the plumes burn their bottoms, like a cold plate passed over a flame. For the first time, scientists have spied one of these warm trails under North America's midriff, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the journal Nature Geoscience.
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Wildcatter hunch unlocks $1.5 trillion oil offshore US
Bloomberg
Texaco Inc. geologist Robert Ryan didn’t suspect he was helping change the energy future of the Gulf of Mexico when he gave the go-ahead for a well that would break the world record for deep-water drilling. The project known as BAHA, undertaken in 1996 by Texaco and its partners, Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Amoco Corp. and Mobil Corp., was a dry hole. That normally would've made it a flop. Instead, BAHA's discovery of oil-rich sands where none were thought to exist was the first step in unlocking a $1.5 trillion trove of crude that's revived the prospects of a body of water many thought had long ago given up most of its fossil-fuel riches.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Scientists developed a new tool to pinpoint oil reserves (The Economic Times)
Scientists find long 'fingers' of heat beneath Earth's surface (Science Recorder)
US tallest mountain's surprising location explained (LiveScience)
Rockware unveils update to data visualization suite (AIPG)
Geologist educates the layman on drilling technology (Grand Forks Herald)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Remote Antarctic trek reveals a glacier melting from below
NPR
VideoBriefScientists watching Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier from space have noticed with some alarm that it has been surging toward the sea. If it were to melt entirely, global sea levels would rise by several feet. "This was a granddaddy of a problem," says Tim Stanton, oceanography research professor at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Glacier.


A new perfection found in diamonds created by an asteroid in Siberian crater 35 million years ago
The Siberian Times
The Popigai reserves are enough to keep the planet in diamonds for 3,000 years. New research indicates special qualities which makes these diamonds unique in the world, according to a new announcement by scientists in Novosibirsk. Their "high abrasiveness" is 50 percent to 60 percent superior to natural or synthetic diamonds. The impact diamonds from the crater also have exclusive polishing characteristics.
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Iron ore rich Pilbara was once a separate continent
Mining.com via SteelGuru
Mining reported that Australia's iron ore rich Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons regions were once a small continent about the size of Japan. According to the leading author, geologist Simon Johnson, central Western Australia was formed by remnants of tectonic plates that crashed, forcing each others' edges up to form mountain ranges. Major fault lines like the ones discovered in the area are promising places to explore for minerals.
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