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Mysterious midcontinent rift a geological hybrid
Nature World News
The Midwest's biggest geological feature, a mysterious Midcontinent Rift some billion years old, is actually a geological hybrid, according to new research. The 1.1 billion-year-old Midcontinent Rift is an ancient and giant 2,000-mile-long underground crack that starts in Lake Superior and runs south to Oklahoma and to Alabama. Scientists have long wondered how this massive piece of scenery came to be. Now an international team of geologists has come up with an explanation.
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Earth's magnetic field could flip within a lifetime
LiveScience via Discovery News
A magnetic field shift is old news. Around 800,000 years ago, magnetic north hovered over Antarctica and reindeer lived in magnetic south. The poles have flipped several times throughout Earth's history. Scientists have estimated that a flip cycle starts with the magnetic field weakening over the span of a few thousand years, then the poles flip and the field springs back up to full strength again. However, a new study shows that the last time the Earth's poles flipped, it only took 100 years for the reversal to happen. And the Earth's magnetic field is in a weakening stage right now.
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Imaging technology helps find hidden geological hazards
Deseret News
Suppose you could look at a hillside and make the trees and shrubs disappear so you could spot hidden hazards: landslides, faults and flood threats.Experts can do exactly that with new data that was just released. Geologist Adam McKean says experts knew there were some faults in the earth west of the Salt Lake City International Airport, for example, but with traditional geology tools they couldn't map them correctly. Now geologists know there is a fault.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now available to pay online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2015 in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to log in to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205.

Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.

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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

Donate online.

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AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG

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The AIPG California Section and UC Davis AIPG Student Section hosting fall field trip
AIPG
The AIPG California Section and UC Davis AIPG Student Section are hosting a fall field trip on Oct. 25, to the Almaden Quicksilver Mine, in San Jose, led by Bill Motzer of Todd Groundwater.

The trip is free for those meeting us at the park in San Jose. Please note that the actual hike will begin at the Hacienda Park entrance and parking area, which is about 2,000 feet south of the Casa Grande Museum. We'll meet at this parking area and trail entrance at 9 a.m.

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Request for award nominations
AIPG
Nominations for awards, accompanied by a supporting statement should be sent via mail (to AIPG, 12000 Washington Street, Thornton, Colorado 80241-3134), fax (303-253-9220) or email by Jan. 15 to the AIPG National Headquarters. National awards include the Ben H. Parker Memorial Medal, the Martin Van Couvering Memorial Award, the John T. Galey, Sr. Memorial Public Service Award, Honorary Membership and the Outstanding Achievement Award. (Click on each link to go to the award's description.) Click here for AIPG National Awards Nomination Form in pdf.
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AAPG Foundation Seeking 2015 Teacher of the Year
AAPG
Applications and nominations are being accepted for the 2015 Teacher of the Year (TOTY) Award. The TOTY award, given by the American Association for Petroleum Geologists Foundation, will once again be granted to a K-12 teacher within the United States who has demonstrated outstanding leadership in the field of geoscience education. The application deadline is Dec. 1.
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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
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Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

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AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver
AIPG
The term "Social License to Operate" (SLO) was originally adopted for use by the Canadian mining industry in the late 1990s, and referred to the concept that social permission was needed for a mining company to conduct its operations, for example from local communities or indigenous people. Since then, the premise of the SLO has been extended to other geological challenges faced by society, such as fracking for oil and gas development, radioactive waste disposal, carbon capture and storage, geologic hazards, and deep-well injection of wastewater.

The lay public is frequently uninformed or misinformed about the complex scientific and technical challenges that accompany these issues. This problem is typically coupled with a general lack of knowledge about subsurface geology. The SLO seeks to alleviate this problem through a variety of public participation strategies to engage with citizens, communities, and stakeholder groups. Through this process, geoscientists can develop an understanding of public knowledge and concerns.

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Requesting articles for Student theme issue of The Professional Geologist (TPG) — Jan/Feb/Mar 2015
AIPG
Submit an article that will assist our student members in knowing what to be prepared for. This information will be placed in the upcoming Jan/Feb/Mar 2015 Student Issue of TPG. Your submittal can be a couple of paragraphs, a letter, an opinion piece, an article on what you are currently working on, photos, student chapter information, etc. Please see the requirements below for submitting an article for TPG. The deadline for submitting an article is Nov. 1.

Instructions to Authors

Articles may be technical or professional in nature. Articles containing news of importance to professional geologists will be considered. Articles should be submitted electronically via email in Word format to Vickie Hill at vlh@aipg.org. Graphics should also be submitted electronically in jpg, tiff, gif, ai, eps, psd or other standard format at 300 dpi.

Order Extra Copies of the Student Issue

The cost of the Student Issue is being discounted from $5 to $4 for quantities of 10 or more. Amount due ($4 x quantity) plus shipping and handling.

Shipping & Handling: Orders up to $15 add $8, orders $15.01-$30 ad $10, orders over $30 add $12. If weight of order exceeds 10 pounds, additional postage will apply. Please forward your order, with payment, to AIPG Headquarters no later than Dec. 1, 2014.

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AIPG fleece scarf available
AIPG
This fleece scarf provides comfort against the cold breeze. Made of anti-pill polyester, this scarf features a matching whipstitch with an embroidered AIPG logo. Available in black or navy. The price is $11.50, including shipping.


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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Oct. 24 SIPES Continuing Education Seminar, Houston Register Online
Nov. 1 Deadline to submit article for Student theme of The Professional Geologist Send articles to Vickie Hill
Nov. 10 AIPG Conference on Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support — Nov. 10 in Denver Register Online
Dec. 15-19 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco AGU
Jan. 1, 2015 Deadline for AIPG membership dues Pay Online
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section



FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR
Archaeologists, geologists help search at North Carolina house
WFMY-TV
Geologists and archaeologists were assisting Forsyth County (North Carolina) Sheriff Deputies and SBI investigators in a search through the backyard where human remains were found in Clemmons. Anthropologists from North Carolina State University Forensics Science Unit helped investigators find the remains. According to the NC State Forensic Unit webpage, forensic geology is the "application of geology to crime investigation and analytic techniques including petrographic microscopy, trace-element analysis, remote sensing, digital mapping and image analysis."

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UK's 'Greatest Geosites' announced
BBC News
The Geological Society of London has named its top 100 geological sites in the U.K. and Ireland, including 10 "people's favorites." The list, compiled into an online clickable map, marks the start of Earth Science Week. Categories for the popular vote included landscapes, outcrops and coastlines, as well as industrial and educational sites.

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Scientists: Siberian exploding holes 'are the key to Bermuda Triangle'
The Siberian Times
Massive craters — two in Yamal and one on the Taymyr peninsula — were revealed during the summer, leading to urgent analysis by scientists as well as a wave of speculation suggesting the cause was aliens from outer space, meteorites or stray missiles. Now scientists have come up with a coherent explanation for the craters and links it to the notorious Bermuda Triangle phenomenon, where ships and aircraft have disappeared under strange circumstances.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


New seafloor map reveals thousands of seamounts
Earth Sky
Vast unexplored areas of the ocean have now been mapped with new satellite data and scientists have discovered thousands of previously uncharted seamounts in addition to an extinct spreading ridge in the Gulf of Mexico. The study was published in the journal Science on Oct. 3.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Mapping.


Syracuse geologists: Microfossils reveal warm oceans had less oxygen
Syracuse University via EurekAlert
Researchers in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences are pairing chemical analyses with micropaleontology — the study of tiny fossilized organisms — to better understand how global marine life was affected by a rapid warming event more than 55 million years ago.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Active moon volcanos in geologically recent times (EarthSky)
Smoking Alaska mountain no volcano, so why is it smoldering? (Alaska Dispatch News)
Join a series of geological treasure hunts with Earth Science Week 2014 (KQED)
New map exposes previously unseen details of seafloor (Scripps Oceanography News)
UK's 'Greatest Geosites' announced (BBC News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




The world has entered a dramatic new geological age
Reuters via Business Insider Australia
Scientists from around the world met recently to decide whether to call time on the Holocene epoch after 11,700 years and begin a new geological age called the Anthropocene — to reflect humankind's deep impact on the planet. For decades, researchers have asked whether humanity's impact on the Earth's surface and atmosphere mean we have entered the Anthropocene — or new human era. A group of geologists, climate scientists, ecologists and an expert in international law that have been conducting research since 2009, all met face-to-face for the first time in Berlin on Oct. 16 and 17 to discuss the issue.
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Fly over a weird landscape on Mars in 3-D
Universe Today
VideoBrief This flyover video from ESA showcases some very interesting landforms on Mars that planetary geologists refer to as "chaotic terrain." There's nothing quite like this on Earth, and scattered throughout a large area to both the west and east of Valles Marineris are hundreds of isolated mountains up to 2,000 meters high.
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Farmer's discovery of mastodon tooth turns field into archaeological dig site
The Columbus Dispatch
VideoBrief The item, bonelike and bigger than the fist of the farmer who found it, showed up in a pile of dirt. It looked prehistoric, so the farmer took it into his house and started searching the Internet. What he thought was a bone was the tooth of a mastodon, a prehistoric elephant-like mammal that roamed North America more than 10,000 years ago. The farmer called some historians, who called some geologists, who have spent the past three months carefully excavating a site near the farmer's soybean field in Morrow County, Ohio.
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