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AIPG's eNews of Oct. 23 included the article Unprecedented blood-filled mosquito fossil raises questions over evolutionary dating methods. This article was linked from the Christian News Network, whose anti-science bias favors young-earth creationism, which, as many of you have commented, is inappropriate for AIPG's eNews and inconsistent with AIPG's purposes.

We at AIPG headquarters agree, and hereby retract any and all endorsement of this article implied by its publication in our eNews.

AIPG is making a transition in its publications from print to electronic distribution. AIPG relies on an external source to provide the content to the eNews, subject to guidelines provided by AIPG. This process is still somewhat experimental for us, and unfortunately the Oct. 23 issue did not receive the thorough editorial review by AIPG that it deserved. As of today, AIPG has established a more formal process of review for the eNews prior to its weekly publication. All content will be reviewed by our national editor and/or AIPG's editorial board before release to the membership.

We are also encouraged by the number of you who emailed, a clear indication that our members are engaging with the eNews.

Sincerely,

William J. Siok, Executive Director
Robert A. Stewart, AIPG National Editor

NASA study finds carbon worlds may be waterless
California Institute of Technology
Our sun is a carbon-poor star. As a result, our planet Earth is made up largely of silicates, not carbon. Stars with much more carbon than the sun, on the other hand, are predicted to make planets chock full of carbon, and perhaps even layers of diamond.
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Italy's Mount Etna volcano erupts
Reuters
Europe's tallest and most active volcano Mount Etna erupted on Oct. 26, spewing glowing lava into the air and sending a vast plume of smoke over the southern Italian island of Sicily. The eruption did not require any mountain villages to be evacuated or cause significant disruption, though airspace over Sicily was briefly closed, according to Catania airport.
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Timeline is a crash course in how geology helped make life on Earth
Vice
Typically, we conceive of life on Earth as beginning around 540 million years ago — with the rise of oxygen, land plants, certain marine invertebrates and eventually the dinosaurs. But an unusual new chart by researchers at Harvard and at Howard Hughes Medical Institute illustrates exactly how the story extends much farther back in time.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2014 membership dues renewal notice
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, in accordance with the Bylaws. You are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2014. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on MEMBER LOGIN to pay dues, make a donation, and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory, or make changes to your record.
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AIPG bimonthly journal available
AIPG
The Professional Geologist — September/October 2013 issue is now available online. All past issues are available online.
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AIPG section newsletters
AIPG
The AIPG Michigan Section Newsletter — October 2013 is now available.
The AIPG Northeast Section Newsletter — Winter 2013 is now available.
The AIPG Texas Section News — September/October 2013 is now available.
The AIPG Colorado Section Newsletter — September 2013 is now available.
The AIPG Ohio Setion Newsletter — September 2013 is now available.
The AIPG Michigan Section Newsletter — August 2013 is now available.
The AIPG Georgia Section Newsletter — August 2013 is now available.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Monitoring Surrogates at Fracking Sites

The development of oil and gas resources, especially by hydraulic fracturing, has increased concerns about potential groundwater contamination. Real-time groundwater quality monitoring networks may be feasible if pollutant-surrogate relationships are established. Learn about surrogates for methane and fracking fluid in a new white paper.
 


AIPG classic poplin jacket
AIPG
This heavy weight, full zip jacket is casually styled and perfect for nearly any occasion, rain or shine, thanks to the water repellent protection. Not only do vents give this jacket superior breathability, they add a sporting accent that goes well with the jacket's cadet-style collar. This jacket has a 65/35 poly/cotton shell, mesh body with sleeves lined in nylon for easy on and off and a drawstring collar with cord locks.

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AIPG's Member's Private Medical Insurance Exchange
The GeoCare Benefits Insurance Program
AIPG's GeoCare Benefits Members' Private Medical Insurance Exchange is now accepting applications for guaranteed-issue health insurance effective on Jan. 1 without exclusions for pre-existing conditions. To view the Exchange, visit www.geocarebenefits.com and click on "Members' Private Medical Insurance Exchange" on the left-hand side. You may also reach the Exchange by phone at 877-739-7845.

The Members’ Private Medical Insurance Exchange is a web-based marketplace in which you can choose from the multiple insurance companies’ plan designs, benefit options, and premium rates available in your state. Unlike many of the public exchanges, our Members’ Private Exchange is staffed by licensed, experienced agents.

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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR
NSF funds $14.5 million to improve geosciences cyberinfrastructure
National Science Foundation
Imagine a world with unlimited access to scientific data in any field. Where researchers can plot data from any source and visualize it any way they'd like, and where they can model results and explore ideas from a desktop, a lab or the field. EarthCube aims to make that vision a reality.

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Mars-to-Earth 'shuttle' confirmed by NASA Curiosity rover
The Daily Galaxy
The surface of Mars is pocked by more than 635,000 impact craters at least 0.6 miles wide. A little-known fact is that each year, Earth is hit by by half a dozen or so one-pound or larger rocks that were blasted off the surface of Mars by large impacts and found their way into Earth-crossing orbits. Nearly 10 percent of the Red Planet meteorites end up crashing into Earth.

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Finding alien worlds on Earth
Space Daily
The most hostile environments on Earth are home to unusual life forms. By studying these "extremophiles" that can cope with extreme heat, cold, pressure or radiation on Earth, astrobiologists can consider whether certain environments in space might be home to similar tiny creatures.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Researchers confirm some eucalyptus trees pilfer gold from ore deposits
National Geographic
Eucalyptus tree roots can delve more than 130 feet deep underground in a thirsty search for water. Researchers had disagreed over whether gold particles seen in eucalyptus leaves were merely wind-blown or truly represented ore traces transported by roots.
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NSF funds $14.5 million to improve geosciences cyberinfrastructure
National Science Foundation
Imagine a world with unlimited access to scientific data in any field. Where researchers can plot data from any source and visualize it any way they'd like, and where they can model results and explore ideas from a desktop, a lab or the field. EarthCube aims to make that vision a reality.
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Fracking for geothermal heat instead of gas
MIT Technology Review
The use of hydraulic fracturing has unlocked vast new reserves of natural gas. Now Alta Rock, a startup based in Seattle, is developing technology that might do the same for geothermal resources — turning a marginal power source into a major source of carbon-free electricity and heat in the United States.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    3-D tectonic modeling answers age-old geology question (Scientific Cmoputing)
The complicated birth of a volcano (Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel via ScienceDaily)
7 unbelievable natural eternal flames from around the world (The Weather Channel)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Skull fossils found estimated to be 1.8 million years old
Las Vegas Guardian Express
The skull fossils found by an international team of scientists in the medieval Georgian town of Dmanisi in 2005 are estimated to be 1.8 million years old. This controversial conclusion indicates that the ancestors of our Homo genus may have evolved from single species when they first migrated out of Africa, not from multiple species, a theory taught in the textbooks since late 1800s.
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Digging for fossils at the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles a century later
The Associated Press via CBS News
It's been about a century, but now a small crew is diligently working through the backlog of fossils at the famous La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles. "Earlier excavations really missed a great part of the story," said John Harris, chief curator at the George C. Page Museum, which oversees the fossil collection.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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