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Evidence of 3.5-billion-year-old bacterial ecosystems may be earliest sign of life on Earth
Fox News
Scientists have discovered what may be the earliest sign of life on Earth. Remains of nearly 3.5-billion-year-old bacteria has been found in north-west Australia. Evidence of the never-before-seen bacteria was found in sedimentary rocks in the remote Pilbara region, home to the world's oldest rock formations. "There was plenty of life from the 3.4 and 3.43 billion-year-old mark — this is pushing it further back," researcher David Wacey, from the University of Western Australia said.
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Geologists find oldest, largest meteorite impact structure
Laboratory Equipment
The world's largest and oldest meteorite impact structure has been discovered through research on the formation of gold deposits in Western Australia's Eastern Goldfields. Located in the eastern Yilgarn, the Watchorn Impact Structure is 560 km in diameter at its widest point and estimated to be more than 2.6 billion years old.
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Solid profession: Geologists in demand as shale plays surge
Houston Chronicle
Geologist Barry Katz, Ph.D., and president of the Houston Geological Society, became interested in science in high school, and he liked being outdoors. Those interests led to his study of geology and culminated in earning a doctorate in marine geology and geophysics. "Everybody's hiring," Katz said. "There are approximately 4,000 geologists in Houston alone. Many are close to retirement. With the various shale plays around the country along with multiple sites in Texas, demand for geologists is high." So, who makes the best geologist?
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AIPG NEWS


Student poster contest winners
AIPG
Five cash prizes were awarded to three undergraduate students and two graduate students at the AIPG 2013 Annual Meeting in Broomfield, Colo. The undergraduate student awardees were:
  • 1st Prize — $500: Stephanie Gallegos, Metropolitan State University of Denver, Colorado, New Suspected Kimberlite: Northern Colorado
  • 2nd Prize — $150: Joseph Mohan, Central Michigan University, Michigan, A Paleoenvironmental Analysis of the Middle Devonian Gravel Point Formation, Western Michigan
  • 3rd Prize — $100: Taylor Sting, PM Environmental/Michigan State University, Michigan, Ferrous Sulfate Effects on High pH Soils.
The graduate student awardees were:
  • 1st Prize — $600 (sponsored by the AIPG Colorado Section): Keryn Wolff, SA, University of Adelaide, South Australia, Carbonate Geochemistry of Yorke Peninsula, South Australia
  • 2nd Prize — $250: Eve Iversen, Iowa State University, Iowa, Limitations of GIS in Mapping Papyrus Along the Egyptian Nile River.
Congratulations!

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AIPG 50th Annual Meeting photos
AIPG
The 2013 AIPG 50th Annual Meeting was a great success. With over 250 participants that included seven AIPG Charter Members. Thank you to all that participated. Here is a link to the photos that have been uploaded so far. Photos from the field trip are also available on the AIPG Facebook page.
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AIPG section newsletters now available
AIPG
The following section newsletters are new available online:
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AIPG fleece scarf
AIPG
This fleece scarf provides comfort against the cold breeze. Made of anti-pill polyester, this scarf features a matching whipstitch with an embroidered AIPG logo. It is 60 inches long and 9 inches wide. Available in black or navy.

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Pay 2014 dues online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2014 in accordance with the Bylaws. You are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2014. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on MEMBER LOGIN to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
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Mark your calendar
AIPG
AIPG will have a booth at the following meetings this year. If you are attending any of these meetings please stop by and say hello or if you would like to volunteer to help staff the booth please contact the office at 303-412-6205 or aipg@aipg.org.

Feb. 23-26, 2014 — SME, Salt Lake City
March 23-25, 2014 — GSA, Lancaster, Pa.
April 9-11, 2014 — GSA, Blacksburg, Va.
April 24-25, 2014 — GSA, Lincoln, Neb.
May 19-21, 2014 — GSA, Bozeman, Mont.

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AIPG 5th Annual Symposium
AIPG
The AIPG 5th Annual Symposium will be held April 16-17, 2014, at the Holiday Inn Columbus Downtown Capital Square in Columbus, Ohio. The discounted rate is $99. Contact the hotel at 866-460-7456.
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5th Conference: Innovative Environmental Assessment and Remediation Technology
AIPG
The AIPG Georgia Section 5th Conference: Innovative Environmental Assessment and Remediation Technology will be held April 23-24 in Kennesaw, Ga. Register online today.
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Shale-Gas Development and Water Issues Symposium
AIPG
The Shale-Gas Development and Water Issues Symposium will take place in March 2014 in Houston. More information will be available later.
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AIPG-AHS 2014 National Conference
AIPG
Join us for the AIPG-AHS 2014 National Conference, Sept. 13-16, 2014, in Prescott, Ariz. The conference will be held at the Prescott Resort & Conference Center, 855-957-4637.
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AIPG 2015 National Conference
AIPG
The AIPG 2015 National Conference, hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section, will be Sept. 23-28, 2015, in Anchorage, Alaska.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR
Could volcanoes be driving Antarctic ice loss?
Agence France-Press via ABC Science
Accelerating ice loss from the Antarctic icesheet could be due in part to active volcanoes under the frozen continent's eastern part, a study has found. From 2002 to 2011, the average annual rate of Antarctic icesheet loss increased from about 30 billion tons to about 147 billion tons, the UN's panel of climate scientists reported in September.

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Breakthrough: The accidental discovery that revolutionized American energy
The Atlantic
The dramatic changes to the nation's energy outlook are as surprising as they are clear. Seven years ago, oil production was in steep decline and natural gas nearly as hard to find. Today, the United States produces over 7.7 million barrels of oil a day, up over 50 percent since 2006 and the most in nearly 25 years. The nation could pump more than eleven million barrels a day by 2020.

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3-D-printed fossils and rocks could transform geology
LiveScience via Fox News
Whether they're cracking open rocks or scanning tiny changes in topography, geologists already work in three dimensions. But one of the most popular attractions at the Geological Society of America's annual meeting in Denver was a 3-D printer spitting out fossils, globes and fractured rocks.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Geologists simulate deep earthquakes in the laboratory
News FIX
More than 20 years ago, geologist Harry Green, now a distinguished professor of the graduate division at the University of California, Riverside, and colleagues discovered a high-pressure failure mechanism that they proposed then was the long-sought mechanism of very deep earthquakes (earthquakes occurring at more than 400 km depth). The result was controversial because seismologists could not find a seismic signal in the Earth that could confirm the results. Seismologists have now found the critical evidence.
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Simple scaling theory used to better predict gas production in barnett shale wells
University of Texas at Austin via Phys.org
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a simple scaling theory to estimate gas production from hydraulically fractured wells in the Barnett Shale. The method is intended to help the energy industry accurately identify low- and high-producing horizontal wells, as well as accurately predict how long it will take for gas reserves to deplete in the wells.
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The physics and sounds of seismicity, or earthquake 'music'
KQED
Earthquakes are vibrations; we all know that. The little ones we get all the time in California occur in the form of high-frequency vibrations — sound — as much as the low-frequency vibrations we perceive as shaking. People typically describe them as being like the sound of a truck rumbling by or a large door slamming. Large earthquakes are another matter. Most of an earthquake's vibrations are too slow for our ears to hear. Wouldn't it be interesting to be able to hear those vibrations? A number of scientific programmers have been playing with this idea, and the results are tantalizing.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Trapped in a fossil: Remnants of a 46-million-year-old meal (PNAS via NPR)
Will jellyfish rule the ocean? (LiveScience via Discovery News)
Deinogalerix masinii: New Giant Fossil Hedgehog from Italy (Geobios via Sci-News.com)
Geoscientist says groundwater contamination via fracturing 'not physically plausible' (The Florida Current)
Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Worm's mysterious blue slime decoded?
National Geographic
Shooting out glowing blue slime is a pretty cool superpower. Parchment tube worms — a common marine animal — have this ability, and Dimitri Deheyn of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego is one of the researchers asking how they do it.
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What did the Colorado Plateau look like 250 million years ago?
National Praks Traveler
What did the Colorado Plateau look like 250 million years ago? That's a question geologists hope to shed some light on via an ambitious project that is pulling rock cores up from as much as 1.5 kilometers down into the plateau's belly. The Colorado Plateau is an expansive region, taking in parts of Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico. Within this geologic province are some of our most iconic national parks. What makes them so stunning is the geology from which they rise. Through the Colorado Plateau Coring Project, geologists hope to peer into buried layers of the plateau.
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More than a year later, aftershocks continue in Costa Rica
Costa Rica Star
On the morning of Sept. 5, 2012, residents of Guanacaste were going about their business and preparing to celebrate Costa Rica's 191st anniversary of its independence from Spain when a powerful earthquake struck the Nicoya Peninsula. That seismic movement, which registered a magnitude of 7.6 on the Richter scale, is still producing aftershocks and striking fear in the hearts of locals and tourists more than a year later.
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New generation of micro sensors for monitoring ocean acidification
National Oceanography Center, Southampton via Phys.org
The first step in developing a cost-effective micro sensor for long-term monitoring of ocean acidification has been achieved by a team of scientists and engineers. The new technology, that will measure pH levels in seawater, was developed by engineers from the National Oceanography Center. In its current form it can be used for on-board analysis of seawater samples, but the ultimate aim is to further develop the design so that it can be deployed for long periods of time in the ocean, taking in situ measurements.
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