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Stonehenge: Origin of stones discovered
Epoch Times
Geologists in Wales have identified the source of stones used to build Stonehenge, they told local publication the Western Mail on Nov. 19. The stones were transported from a hill in Pembrokeshire, Wales, U.K., about 150 miles away from the Stonehenge site and about a mile away from where they were previously thought to originate.
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Seawater discovered near the Chesapeake Bay is up to 150 million years old
The Washington Post
Not only is the Chesapeake Bay so enormous it can be seen from space, it essentially came from outer space. An asteroid or huge chunk of ice slammed into Earth about 35 million years ago, splashing into the Early Cretaceous North Atlantic, sending tsunamis as far as the Blue Ridge Mountains and leaving a 56-mile-wide hole at the mouth of what is now the bay. But a newly published research paper written by U.S. Geological Survey scientists shows that wasn't the end of it.
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Greenland ice sheet was smaller 3,000-5,000 years ago
redOrbit
There have been many studies telling us how small the Greenland ice sheet is today. A new study, published in the journal Geology, reveals that the ice sheet was actually smaller between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago. Surprisingly, the sheet was as small during this period as it has ever been in recent history.
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AIPG NEWS


2 new AIPG student chapters
AIPG
We now have 18 student chapters! Welcome our newest chapters:

Georgia Southwestern State University in Americus, Ga., faculty sponsor is Dr. Tom Weiland, MEM-1831 and chapter sponsor is Ron Wallace, CPG-08153. Chapter officers: President — Joseph Kinard, SA-4785; Vice President — Tyler Tomberlin, SA-4836; Kostner Guyton, SA-4800; and Treasurer — Donovan Dickey, SA-4837.

Metro State University of Denver, faculty sponsor is Dr. Uew Kackstaetter, MEM-2437 and chapter sponsor is David Abbott, CPG-04570. Chapter officers: President — Felicia Kruger, SA-4731; Vice President — Olivia Ruiz, SA-4869; and Secretary — Jessica Davey, SA-4424.

The complete list of student chapters is available here.

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Accepting applications for the position of AIPG Executive Director
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The successful candidate will succeed the current director who has announced his intent to retire. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Click on the "Read More" link for details.
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AIPG embroidered beanie cap
AIPG
A warm, stylish accessory constructed from 100 percent acrylic. This beanie comes in a variety of solid colors, or with a contrasting trim, embroidered with the AIPG logo. Available colors: gray, gray/black, black, black/natural, light pink/white, natural/navy, navy, navy/natural.


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'Door to Hell': Turkmenistan crater has been on fire for over 40 years
International Science Times
In 1971, the Soviets opened the "Door to Hell," and 42 years later that door is still open. A natural gas field in Derweze, Turkmenistan, the Door to Hell is the site of a former Soviet oil operation that went wrong when a rig collapsed into a large crater. Soviet geologists decided the best thing to do was light the crater on fire to burn off its poisonous methane gas, but things didn't go as planned, and the fire still burns today.

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Could volcanoes be driving Antarctic ice loss?
Agence France-Press via ABC Science
Accelerating ice loss from the Antarctic icesheet could be due in part to active volcanoes under the frozen continent's eastern part, a study has found. From 2002 to 2011, the average annual rate of Antarctic icesheet loss increased from about 30 billion tons to about 147 billion tons, the UN's panel of climate scientists reported in September.

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Geologists find oldest, largest meteorite impact structure
Laboratory Equipment
The world's largest and oldest meteorite impact structure has been discovered through research on the formation of gold deposits in Western Australia's Eastern Goldfields. Located in the eastern Yilgarn, the Watchorn Impact Structure is 560 km in diameter at its widest point and estimated to be more than 2.6 billion years old.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Second-highest Myanmar peak may actually be highest
The Associated Press via Las Vegas Sun
Mount Gamlang, long thought of as Myanmar's second-highest peak, may actually be the highest. A U.S.-Myanmar team climbed Gamlang, measured at 19,140 feet in 1925. Using a GPS device, the team measured the peak at 19,258 feet. Digital elevation data also indicate that the peak of Mount Hkakabo, previously measured at 19,295 feet, may have been overestimated.
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Geologizing with Doctor Who
Scientific American
Nov. 23, 1963 the first episode of the British science-fiction television program "Doctor Who" was broadcast. The series follows the adventures of the "Doctor," last survivor of the Time Lords. In his 50 years long history the abilities of the Doctor to manipulate space and time made physicists and astronomers alike speculate about the science behind Doctor Who. But what about the geology as depicted in the series?
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Print your own dinosaur bones
DOTmed.com
Ever dream of holding a sauropod skull in your hand? New imaging and printing technology may soon give the public unprecedented access to millions of fragile, rare fossils. 3-D printing has already received plenty of press for making anything from guns to bionic ears to guitars. But it also has broad applications for paleontologists, geologists and other researchers who handle rare artifacts.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Solid profession: Geologists in demand as shale plays surge (Houston Chronicle)
Evidence of 3.5-billion-year-old bacterial ecosystems may be earliest sign of life on Earth (Fox News)
Breakthrough: The Accidental Discovery That Revolutionized American Energy (The Atlantic)
Solid profession: Geologists in demand as shale plays surge (Houston Chronicle)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


The ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth
Popular Mechanics
NWA 7533 traveled a long way to get into the lab of Munir Humayun at Florida State University. The ancient meteorite was recovered in 2011 after its long interplanetary journey. Soon the space rock was sold off to a collectors in the United States and France, but eventually a sample found its way into Humayun's hands. Once he got a look at it, Humayun knew he had something rare.
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Study preps mission to Martian moon
The Brown Daily Herald
A recent study by University geologists will help inform a Russian mission to the Martian moon, Phobos. The mission, which is planned to launch mid-2020, will be the first to return with deep-space material, including material from Mars and will potentially answer questions about Phobos' origin.
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Sinkhole maps will show Florida's vulnerability
WLRN-TV
Florida is susceptible to sinkholes because so much of its landscape sits on rocks that dissolve easily, such as limestone. The Florida Geological Survey is building a map to show the risk of sinkholes around the state. The project is the result of what happened last year after Tropical Storm Debby.
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