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Comet's water different from Earth's
USA Today
Where Earth's water came from remains a mystery, but it probably did not come from comets in our corner of the solar system, according to data from the Rosetta mission. The Rosetta orbiter has found that the water on this icy space rock from the Kuiper Belt, which extends just past Neptune, differs from that on Earth. The spacecraft has been analyzing Comet 67P's water content since rendezvousing with it in August.
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Ancient mollusk discovered under the Arctic
Nature World News
Nearly four years ago, geological surveys of the Arctic Ocean seafloor revealed the presence of shells buried deep in its sediment. Now researchers have analyzed these specimens to discover something astounding: they are million-year-old bivalve mollusks — a new genus and species of their own to add to the fossil records.
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Proof of Japan's kamikaze typhoons found in ancient rocks
Popular Science
In the 13th century, the Mongol Empire, led by Kublai Khan, thought it would be a great idea to invade Japan. They tried in 1274, launching a fleet of hundreds boats. But while they were on their way to the island nation, legend has it that a Kamikaze, or "divine wind," intercepted the fleet and destroyed it. The Mongols tried again in 1281, only to be met once again by another typhoon. The storms assumed a place of legend in Japanese history, exaggerated over the intervening centuries. Now, geologists have found evidence that the large storms really did occur.
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AIPG NEWS


AIPG 2015 Membership Dues — Now available to pay online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2015, in accordance with the bylaws. You are encouraged to log in to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2015. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. A few straightforward instructions and the link follow for paying online. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205.

Click on "Member Login" to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.

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The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists
AIPG
The Foundation of the American Institute of Professional Geologists has been established to: make educational grants to support individual scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students in the geosciences; prepare literature with educational content about the role of geosciences as a critical component of the sciences and of the national economy and public health and safety; make grants to classroom geoscience teachers for classroom teaching aids; support development of education programs for the science and engineering community; support geoscience internships in the nation's capital; support geological field trips for K-12; and support educational outreach programs to the public on the state and local level.

Donate online.

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  No Travel Required Online Geotechnics
ME | PhD | Certificate

Designed for geologists and engineers working in the geotechnical industry.  Live Stream Video, Collaborative Software, Archived Classes

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AIPG call for abstracts — 2015 Energy Exposition
AIPG
Join the American Institute of Professional Geologists at the 2015 Energy Exposition in Billings, Montana! Present and attend the technical sessions organized and hosted by AIPG on June 24-25 with an optional field trip on Friday, June 26. The schedule is structured to allow plenty of time to browse and participate in the Energy Exposition. Registration will include "Breakfast and a Movie" both days, lunch and reduced ticket pricing for the Expo dinner on June 25. Click here for additional information on the Energy Exposition. The technical session presentations will be held at the Rimrock Arena within the MetraPark Expo Center, 308 6th Avenue N., Billings, Montana, 59101. To have your abstract considered for a presentation please submit an abstract online by March 9, 2015.
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AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG

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AIPG Journal — The Professional Geologist (TPG)
AIPG
The AIPG quarterly journal, The Professional Geologist, October/November/December 2014 issue is now available online.
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Request for award nominations
AIPG
Nominations for awards, accompanied by a supporting statement should be sent via mail (to AIPG, 12000 Washington Street, Thornton, Colorado 80241-3134), fax (303-253-9220) or email by Jan. 15 to the AIPG National Headquarters. National awards include the Ben H. Parker Memorial Medal, the Martin Van Couvering Memorial Award, the John T. Galey, Sr. Memorial Public Service Award, Honorary Membership and the Outstanding Achievement Award. (Click on each link to go to the award's description.) Click here for AIPG National Awards Nomination Form in pdf.
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Button-up long sleeve denim AIPG shirt
AIPG
A 6.5 oz. fabric, 100 percent cotton, garment washed, generous cut, double needle stitched, tuck-in tail, button-down collar, horn tone buttons, patch pocket and adjustable cuffs with an embroidered AIPG logo is now available. Available in sizes small-3XL.


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AIPG button-up long sleeve easy care shirts
AIPG
This comfortable wash-and-wear shirt is indispensable for the workday. Wrinkle resistance makes this shirt a cut above the competition so you can be, too. Available colors: Athletic gold, bark, black, bright lavender, burgundy, classic navy, clover green, coffee bean, court green, dark green, deep berry, eggplant, gold, hibiscus, light blue, light pink, light stone, Maui blue, Mediterranean Blue, navy, purple, red, royal blue, steel grey, stone, strong blue, teal green, Texas orange, tropical pink, ultramarine blue, white and yellow. Available sizes: Small-6XL.

Available for men or women.

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Date Event More Information
Dec. 15-19 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco AGU
Jan. 1, 2015 Deadline for AIPG membership dues Pay Online
Jan. 16, 2015 Call for Abstracts due for the 5th Annual AIPG Michigan Section Technical Workshop: Site Characterization AIPG Michigan Section
Feb. 13, 2015 AIPG National Executive Committee Meeting Tucson, Arizona
March 2015 AIPG/AGWT Shale-Gas Development and Water Issues Conference Houston
April 2015 AIPG Hydraulic Fracturing Conference TBD
June 24-25, 2015 2015 Energy Exposition with Technical Sessions Presented by AIPG Billings, Montana
Sept. 19-22, 2015 AIPG 2015 National Conference, Anchorage, Alaska Hosted by AIPG National and co-hosted by AIPG Alaska Section


INDUSTRY NEWS


Storing hydrogen underground could boost transportation, energy security
Sandia National Laboratories via Phys.org
Large-scale storage of low-pressure, gaseous hydrogen in salt caverns and other underground sites for transportation fuel and grid-scale energy applications offers several advantages over above-ground storage, says a recent Sandia National Laboratories study sponsored by the Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office. Geologic storage of hydrogen gas could make it possible to produce and distribute large quantities of hydrogen fuel for the growing fuel cell electric vehicle market, the researchers concluded.
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The hydrological rise and fall of The Roman Empire
Science 2.0
The Roman empire stretched over three continents, had 70 million people, and had a logistics and infrastructure system that kept them going for centuries. They had smart agricultural practices and an extensive grain-trade network that enabled them to thrive even where water was scarce — but they knew their limits according to a paper in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Hydrology.


Mars rover revealed evidence of vast water formations
Liberty Voice
The Mars rover, Curiosity, revealed evidence of vast water formations in images sent back from the mission recently. In the 28-month-long search for evidence of the building blocks of life, the $2.5 billion mission to Mars has already discovered multiple elements scientists believe contribute to a habitable environment on the red planet. Water and evidence of other key elements have already been found, along with sulphates and sulphides, leading scientists to conclude that the necessary elements to support life existed on the planet.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Continent-sized scan reveals US underbelly (LiveSceince via Yahoo News)
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Why the DC region is literally sinking into the sea (National Post via The Washington Post)
Eerie quiet at Northwest fault where 'big one' may shake (The Associated Press via Chinook Observer)
Why is Antarctic sea ice getting thicker? (The Conversation via Science 2.0)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




X-ray diffraction helps identify a dozen Martian minerals
Sci-News.com
An international team of scientists led by Dr. David Bish of Indiana University has analyzed recent data from the CheMin, a miniaturized X-ray diffraction instrument on board NASA's Curiosity rover, to characterize the mineralogy of Martian soil and rocks.
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Would-be coders are studing India's glaciers
Bloomberg Businessweek
The Himalayas include the world's tallest mountains, constitute its third-largest storehouse of ice and are the source of rivers that sustain about 800 million people from China to Pakistan. The range is also among the least observed icy watersheds on Earth, which means no one knows how a warming climate will change river flows, trigger floods, or otherwise devastate the region's towns and farms. In part, that's because just a handful of scientists are studying glaciers in India.
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'Marsquakes' shook up range of hills in ancient lake bed
the Register
NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey believe they've found evidence of ancient earthquakes on Mars. Or should that be Marsquakes? The evidence was spotted in the west Candor Chasma, one of the canyons in the Valles Marineris canyon system.
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Cyclone Tracy: Tracking weather with satellites and balloons off the coast of northern Australia
ABC News
Before Cyclone Tracy bore down on Darwin in 1974, forecasters were mapping its trajectory on pieces of old fax paper. Forty years later, Australia uses satellites from Japan, Europe and the United States to gather data used in forecasting, and satellite technology is a leading tool of forecasters. There are even three dimensional radars which tell meteorologists where the most localized damage will occur.
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