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Earth's greatest killer finally caught, thanks to geologists
NBC News
Geology is partly detective work, and scientists now have enough evidence to book a suspect in the biggest environmental catastrophe in Earth's history. Painstaking analysis of rocks from China and Russia prove the culprit is a series of massive volcanic eruptions, which flooded ancient Siberia with thick lava flows just before Earth's worst mass extinction almost 252 million years ago.
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Ancient lake found on Mars
Geek Magazine
NASA's Curiosity Rover has made another historic discovery, evidence of a freshwater lake on the surface of Mars. According to John P. Grotzinger, project scientist at California Institute of Technology, the water may have even been good enough to drink. "This just looks like a pretty darn ordinary Earth-like lake in terms of its chemistry."
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Rare space rock goes unnoticed for 140 years
NewScientist
A rare meteorite that formed soon after the origin of the solar system has been discovered in a private geological collection — 140 years after it fell to Earth. The stone, which is around 4.6 billion years old, was recently handed over to Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, the Netherlands.
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AIPG NEWS


Request for 2014 National Awards nominations
AIPG
Send in your nominations for the AIPG 2014 National Awards due Jan. 20. Click "Read More" for information on the awards and for the nomination form.
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AIPG Section Newsletters now available online
AIPG
The following section newsletters are new available online:
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AIPG 5th Annual Symposium: Call for abstracts
AIPG
AIPG has issued a call for abstracts for its 5th Annual Symposium: Marcellus, Utica, and Point Pleasant Shale: Energy Development and Enhancement, April 16-17, 2014, in Columbus, Ohio.
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Accepting applications for the position of AIPG Executive Director
AIPG
The American Institute of Professional Geologists is accepting applications for the position of Executive Director. The successful candidate will succeed the current director who has announced his intent to retire. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.
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Foundation of the AIPG — 2013 year end tax planning: 2 ways to consider
AIPG
At the Foundation of the AIPG, we want to make you aware of some important tax-saving legislation that will expire at the end of 2013.
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Pay 2014 dues online
AIPG
Annual membership dues are due and payable Jan. 1, 2014 in accordance with the Bylaws. You are encouraged to login to the AIPG Member portion of the website to pay your dues for 2014. Paying online helps save on printing and postage costs. Credit card payments can be taken over the phone 303-412-6205 or fax your dues statement with credit card information to 303-253-9220, or mailing address is below. Call if you have any questions 303-412-6205. Click on MEMBER LOGIN to pay dues, make a donation and purchase insignia items. Your login is your email and the system has you setup your password if you haven't already. You must login to pay dues, search the directory or make changes to your record.
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AIPG polar fleece 1/4-zip pullover
AIPG
You'll appreciate the comfort of this soft pullover all year round. Embroidered AIPG lettering and pick and gavel in white and gold. Available in several colors and sizes.

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20 ancient supervolcanoes discovered in Utah and Nevada
Sci-News.com
Geologists from Brigham Young University, Berkeley Geochronology Center and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have found evidence of twenty ancient supervolcanoes near the Utah-Nevada border. The newly discovered supervolcanoes aren't active today, but 30 million years ago more than 5,500 cubic km of magma erupted during a one-week period near a place called Wah Wah Springs.

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Did volcano on Mercury erupt for a billion years?
Space.com
Sitting just 36 million miles in front of our star, sun-baked Mercury receives a colossal dose of solar radiation with almost no atmosphere to soften the blast. Since Mariner 10 first revealed its surface in the 1970s, conspicuously smooth plains suggested that in places, the impact craters had once been resurfaced by giant lava flows. And now, NASA's latest mission to the inner solar system has begun to shed new light on its volcanic past.

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Geology: North America's broken heart
Nature
A billion years ago, a huge rift nearly cleaved North America down the middle. And then it failed. Researchers may be getting close to finding out why.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Expert: Utah rockslides more likely
The Spectrum
Utah Geological Survey experts said it is unclear when another rock slide could take place at the Rockville Bench Mesa in Rockville, but as the freeze-thaw season continues, residents may be at a larger risk than normal. Bill Lund, senior scientist for the UGS geologic hazards program, said there are "definitely" seasons where rock falls are more common.
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Mud volcano to stop 'by decade's end'
BBC News
Scientists say the eruption of the Lusi mud volcano in Indonesia should be all but over by the end of the decade — much sooner than previous estimates. The assessment is based on satellite data that records the rate at which the ground is changing in response to the material spewing up on to the surface.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Did volcano on Mercury erupt for a billion years? (Space.com)
Deep-sea study reveals cause of 2011 tsunami: Unusually thin, slippery geological fault found (McGill University via ScienceDaily)
Physicists prove foaming beer bottle trick may help understand volcanic eruptions (The Telegraph)
New York State Geologist (New York State Education Department)

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Exploration opportunities abound offshore West Africa
Offshore
Deepwater oil exploration offshore West Africa has flourished since the first oil and gas exploration of the Congo basin in 1994. Over the last 20 years, this region has become pivotal for the exploration and production of oil and natural gas. Across the continent, deepwater oil and gas activity extends from Mauritania to Angola, with total oil and gas production growing from 58.9 percent in 2001 to 78.3 percent by 2011.
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Jurassic sea of sand stretched for miles and miles
The Columbus Dispatch
Sand. Sand as far as the eye could see. Sand that stretched from central Arizona to northern Wyoming and spilled into California and Nevada. Dunes as tall as 30 feet. That would have been your view if you had visited central Utah 195 million years ago, early in the Jurassic Period. Such a huge expanse of sand is called a sand sea or erg, from the Arabic word meaning dune field. In its current state, it covers 102,300 square miles. During the Jurassic, it might have been two and a half times larger.
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What a geologist can teach us about better science education
The Seattle Times
Here's a novel idea that could flip high-school science education on its head: Instead of teaching biology as the first course for high-school freshmen, start instead with physics. That's one of the many ideas burbling from the mind of Scott Linneman, a geology professor at Western Washington University.
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