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Crystal clarity wins Chemistry Nobel for Israeli
The Associated Press via Google    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Israeli scientist Daniel Shechtman Wednesday won the 2011 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for the secret of quasicrystals, an atomic mosaic whose discovery overturned theories about solids. Shechtman, aged 70, ran into fierce hostility among fellow chemists after making a eureka-like discovery in 1982 that at the time was dismissed as laughable. Read the associated Physical Review Letters paper.
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Physics Nobel explainer: Why is expanding universe accelerating?
National Geographic    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail
article
What goes up must come down. Few on Earth would argue with the fundamental law of gravity. But the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to three scientists who uncovered a dark side of the force. New Nobel laureates Saul Perlmutter and Adam Riess of the U.S. and Brian Schmidt of Australia contributed to the discovery that the universe is not only expanding but also speeding up. More

UT grad student faces trial in Iran, scientists call espionage charges 'ludicrous'
Austin American-Statesman    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
As scientists and academics across the world continue to push for his release, a 29-year-old University of Texas physics graduate student faces trial in his native Iran on espionage charges. Omid Kokabee, 29, started attending UT last fall to work on his Ph.D. in optics. More

'Accelerating universe' could be just an illusion
MSNBC    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A new theory suggests that the accelerating expansion of the universe is merely an illusion. Read the associated Physical Review D abstract. More



Trilayer graphene exhibits quantum effect
Science News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Three could be the magic number for making spintronic devices from thin carbon sheets. Read the associated Physical Review Letters abstract. More

Accelerator finds new gear
The Wall Street Journal    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Scientists powered down the nation's largest particle accelerator that for nearly three decades has been revealing insights into the building blocks of matter. But closing the Tevatron accelerator won't mean the end of cutting-edge research at the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. More

Sweet beams: Lasers to measure blood sugar
Science News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A new, gentler technique for measuring blood sugar uses a pair of laser beams instead of a needle. The device could provide a way for diabetics to monitor their glucose levels without the pain of pricked fingers. Read the abstract of the forthcoming Physical Review E article. More

Discover our Cryogen-Free Family of Products

Quantum Design manufactures a full line of cryogen-free, automated material characterization systems for the scientific community. These systems provide temperatures from 0.05 to 1000 K and magnet fields up to 16 tesla. Cryogen-free systems include the Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS®), MPMS SQUID VSM, VersaLab, and the new PPMS DynaCool. MORE


Prediction or cause? Information theory may hold the key
PhysOrg    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Physicists ponder how to tell the difference between something predicting an event and something actually causing an event. Read the associated Physical Review Letters abstract. More

Richard Feynman, the late physicist, is hero of new graphic novel
The Washington Post    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
There is a new graphic novel starring a particle physicist. Not, mind you, just any particle physicist. The people’s particle physicist. More

Fiber-Coupled High-Power Optical Amplifier
Sacher Lasertechnik offers fiber coupled optical amplifiers. Available wavelength: 650nm to 1120nm. Free space power of up to 2.5W @ 780nm and 2W @ 850nm are achieved with an M²<1.7. The fiber output version achieves more than 1W within a single mode polarization maintaining optical fiber. For more information contact us at 1-800-352-3639  or www.sacher-laser.com more


Quantum life: The weirdness inside us
NewScientist    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Ever felt a little incoherent? Or maybe you've been in two minds about something, or even in a bit of delicate state. Well, here's your excuse: perhaps you are in thrall to the strange rules of quantum mechanics. Read the associated Physical Review Letters abstract. More

New way to store light could prove useful for optical communication
PhysOrg    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A proof-of-principle experiment has successfully stored optical information as mechanical excitations inside silica microspheres. The microspheres serve as optomechanical resonators, which have cavities that allow the scientists to generate mechanical excitations. Read the associated Physical Review Letters abstract. More

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Active galactic nuclei measure the universe
Physics World    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A common type of active galactic nuclei (AGN) could be used as an accurate "standard candle" for measuring cosmic distances - according to astronomers in Denmark and Australia. AGNs are some of the brightest objects in the visible universe and the technique could allow astronomers to determine much larger distances than is possible with current techniques, the scientists say. More

Seismologists' trial in Italy highlights need for routine earthquake forecasting, geophysicist says
PhysOrg    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Six Italian seismologists and one government official went on trial for manslaughter in Italy last week. The unusual trial stems from accusations that the seven failed to adequately communicate the potential for a major earthquake to the population around the central Italian town of L'Aquila, which was hit by a devastating magnitude 6.3 earthquake in the predawn hours of April 6, 2009. More
 
 

APS Weekly NewsBrief
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