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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   January 06, 2015

 



CDC lab technician still healthy after possible Ebola exposure
Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy
A lab technician at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention remains free of symptoms after possible exposure to Ebola virus from the mishandling of material, according to CDC officials. The CDC reported Dec. 24 that some material from an Ebola experiment that may have contained live virus was mistakenly moved from a biosafety level 4 lab to a BSL-2 lab, leading to possible exposure of a technician who worked with the material in the less secure lab.
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CDC: Flu activity high in much of the country
Infection Control Today
According to a recent FluView report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, flu activity continued to increase in the United States and is high in about half of the country with national influenza like illness now approaching the peak level seen during the 2012-2013 season. The 2012-2013 flu season was the last influenza A-predominant season in the United States.
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Scientists begin testing drugs for gene mutation linked to multiple cancers
Fox News
Scientists have begun clinical trials for the treatment of a gene mutation linked to multiple cancers, reveals a study published in the journal Cancer Discovery. In 1982, researchers discovered that the gene TRK caused a small percentage of colon cancers.
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Common breast biopsy finding may be more dangerous than thought
HealthDay News
Women who have a precancerous condition known as atypical hyperplasia of the breast are at higher risk of developing breast cancer than experts had believed, a new study finds. Hyperplasia is an overgrowth of cells. When it occurs in a distorted pattern, it's called atypical hyperplasia.
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Could HIV make hearing worse?
Medical News Today
Human immunodeficiency virus can be incredibly debilitating, leaving individuals vulnerable to serious illnesses. On top of this, researchers have now suggested that adults with the virus have poorer low- and high-frequency hearing than adults who do not have the disease.
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Grant to speed Ebola drug production
University of California, Davis via Lab Manager
Developed by Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc. of San Diego, in collaboration with the U.S. government and partners in Canada, Zmapp is a cocktail of antibodies produced in and extracted from whole tobacco plants. The University of California, Davis team, including plant scientists, molecular biologists and chemical engineers, will attempt to produce the antibodies from plant cells grown in bioreactors instead of in whole plants.
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New handheld imaging device can diagnose melanoma in physicians' offices, potentially reducing the volume of skin biopsies referred to pathology labs
DARK Daily
Dermapathologists will be interested to learn about a new handheld, point-of-care device that images melanoma tumors and enables the in vivo diagnosis of melanoma. Because this diagnostic technology is noninvasive and provides immediate results, it is likely to be preferred by patients and doctors alike and could thus substantially reduce the volume of skin biopsies referred to dermapathologists and pathology laboratories.
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New version of common antibiotic could eliminate risk of hearing loss
Stanford University Medical Center via ScienceDaily
A commonly used antibiotic can be modified to eliminate the risk that it will cause hearing loss, a study in mice has demonstrated. The newly patented antibiotic, N1MS, cured urinary tract infection in mice just as well as sisomcicin, but did not cause deafness, study results show.
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Stem cell divisions help explain cancer risk
The Scientist
While genetic and lifestyle factors can influence whether a person develops cancer, according to a study published in Science, random chance also appears to play a major role. Cancer rates among adult tissues vary substantially. For example, a person''s risk of getting lung cancer is more than 11 times that of developing brain cancer — and eight times greater than that of stomach cancer.
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Scientists use light to induce REM sleep
Medical News Today
While we know that rapid eye movement — or REM — sleep is an essential part of restful sleep, we do not know much about what controls it. Now, researchers — using a new technology called optogenetics — have discovered they can trigger REM episodes in mice by shining a light directly onto selected brain cells or neurons.
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