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1.2 billion reasons to celebrate: India set to be polio-free
The Guardian
A landmark achievement was marked for global public health and the worldwide effort to eradicate polio. India, which once had the highest number of polio cases in the world, is now polio-free, an achievement reports say the World Health Organization will certify in February. But it's been a long road to get here.
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Chemical imaging brings cancer tissue analysis into the digital age
Imperial College London via R&D Magazine
When tests are carried out on a patient's tissue today, such as to look for cancer, the test has to be interpreted by a histology specialist, and can take weeks to obtain a full result. Mass spectrometry imaging uses technologies that reveal how hundreds or thousands of chemical components are distributed in a tissue sample. Scientists have proposed using MSI to identify tissue types for many years, but until now, no method has been devised to apply such technology to any type of tissue.
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ASCLS-APHL webinar series offers hot topics for 2014!
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
CLIA Competency Assessment, Quality Indicators for Pre- and Post-analytical Lab Processes, and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Case Studies: Effective Resistance Detection and Reporting — three hot topics for 2014! P.A.C.E.®-approved. Go to the ASCLS website for more information.
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Multidrug resistance common in neonatal bacteremia
Medscape Medical News
A sizable share of f gram-negative bacilli bacteremia cases in the neonatal intensive care unit are now multidrug resistant, new data show. However, the risk factors identified may help take the guesswork out of empirical antibiotic therapy in NICU patients.
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CDC: US lung cancer rate in men and women down
UPI
The rate of new lung cancer cases decreased among U.S. men and women from 2005 to 2009, federal health officials say. A report in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report found lung cancer rates fell 2.6 percent per year among men — from 87 to 78 cases per 100,000 men — and 1.1 percent per year among women — down 57 to 54 cases per 100,000 women.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CellaVision Automates and Standardizes the Manual Differential

CellaVision introduces CellAtlas®, the perfect way to learn the basics of hematology cell morphology. This App for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch compliments our digital cell morphology portfolio, and is an educational tool to assist in the recognition and classification of blood cells, by utilizing mini-lectures and cell quizzes. More
 


CDC: Climate change increasing Korean disease rates
The Weather Channel
The consequences of climate change stretch beyond deep freezes. In South Korea, warmer temperatures have already begun to lengthen tick and mosquito season, causing the number of infectious diseases to rise by more than 20,000 cases from 2012 to 2013, according to a report from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in The Korea Herald.
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Patient-generated data likely to grow as meaningful use moves forward
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
Stage 3 of the meaningful use incentive program will almost certainly expand the collection and use of patient-generated data, which could give a boost to technology such as home-monitoring devices and patient portals. The Health IT Policy Committee, the body that provides policy guidance to the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, said it will recommend that hospitals and health systems be required to expand their collection and use of patient-generated data to qualify for stage 3 of the meaningful use incentive program.
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Does chopping down forests spread diseases?
Smithsonian
Scientists have long observed that infectious disease outbreaks sometimes occur where and when forest habitats are degraded. The most notorious example is the Ebola virus, which causes an often fatal illness in humans; it was first identified in Congo, whose forests have been heavily logged. Another thing scientists have documented is that forests divided by roads, farms and settlements tend to hold fewer mammal species. Helen Esser, a doctoral candidate at Wageningen University in the Netherlands, has come up with an innovative way to determine if that might be a key to human disease outbreaks.
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MERS-CoV, avian influenza remind us of the ongoing challenge
Infection Control Today
Despite extraordinary advances in development of countermeasures (diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines), the ease of world travel and increased global interdependence have added layers of complexity to containing these infectious diseases that affect not only the health but also the economic stability of societies.
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
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New Affordable LED Lighting System

Bridging the gap between costly color-specific LED lighting and lower-cost conventional fluorescent lighting, Percival Scientific, Inc. has introduced the LED-Elite Series. These research chambers feature a multicolor LED lamp providing the correct spectral quality at the correct irradiance with exceptional environmental control every time. A webinar explaining the features and benefits is available at www.percival-scientific.com


Alternative breast cancer treatment cited in woman's death
ABC News
A Colorado woman died after injecting the supplement cesium chloride into her breast as an alternative treatment for breast cancer, according to a new case study published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. The 61-year-old woman, whose name was not released for privacy reasons, had been taking cesium tablets and a handful of other vitamin supplements for more than a year, according to Dr. Daniel Sessions, the medical toxicologist who treated the woman at the Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center in Denver.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    CDC names top 5 health threats in 2014 (MedCity News)
Workers' hands harbor C. difficile after routine CDI patient care (Healio)
Daycare surfaces may hold germs longer than thought (HealthDay News)
Genetically identical bacteria can behave in radically different ways (Infection Control Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




New finding has major implications for genetic testing
Dark Daily
Different research studies are producing data that indicate a large proportion of humans may have more than one genome. This research has been enabled by advancements in both gene sequencing technology and the capabilities in computational and analytical software.
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T memory stem cells appear to hide HIV viral reservoir
Medscape Medical News
Human immunodeficiency virus sequence variants resembling early postinfection sequences‏ were found in CD4 T memory stem cells long after treatment, according to a study published online in Nature Medicine. The findings suggest a long-term viral reservoir and potential targets for future treatment.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
1.2 billion reasons to celebrate: India set to be polio-free
The Guardian
A landmark achievement was marked for global public health and the worldwide effort to eradicate polio. India, which once had the highest number of polio cases in the world, is now polio-free, an achievement reports say the World Health Organization will certify in February.

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read more
CDC names top 5 health threats in 2014
MedCity News
The disease detectives at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention named the top five global health threats they expect to tackle in 2014. Topping the list is the threat of the emergence and spread of new microbes, but several other threats are also on the CDC's radar.

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More evidence that blood transfusions raise thrombosis risk
Medscape Medical News
Many patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes receive blood or blood products due to bleeding complications or in response to anemia, yet there is also evidence that transfusions may be an independent risk factor for ischemic events, according to a study.

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Animal study gives hope for on-demand vaccines
University of Washington via Laboratory Equipment
University of Washington engineers hope a new type of vaccine they have shown to work in mice will one day make it cheaper and easy to manufacture on-demand vaccines for humans. Immunizations could be administered within minutes where and when a disease is breaking out. The UW team injected mice with nanoparticles synthesized using an engineered protein that both mimics the effect of an infection and binds to calcium phosphate, the inorganic compound found in teeth and bones.
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