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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   January 20, 2015

 



Bone stem cells shown to regenerate bones, cartilage in adult mice
Columbia University Medical Center via ScienceDaily
A stem cell capable of regenerating both bone and cartilage has been identified in bone marrow of mice. The cells, called osteochondroreticular stem cells, were discovered by tracking a protein expressed by the cells.
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New HIV treatment, antiretroviral cabotegravir, lasts for 3 months
Medical Daily
Today, HIV infections are completely treatable thanks to antiretroviral medication. Only problem is these drugs must be taken on a regular basis for them to remain effective, and for many HIV-positive individuals throughout the world, this simply isn't possible.
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Initial prostate biopsies may be more accurate at academic centers
Reuters
Men may get more accurate prostate cancer biopsies at an academic medical center than at a community hospital, say Canadian researchers. The study focused on men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer based on the results of initial biopsies. These men are typically monitored by doctors but don't get treatment right away because their tumors are usually small and slow-growing.
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CDC: This season's flu vaccine only 23 percent effective
Medical News Today
A report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed that the 2014-2015 flu season had already crossed the threshold for epidemic status, with 15 child deaths from the virus so far. Now, a new report from the organization estimates this season's flu vaccine is only 23 percent effective across all age groups.
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After enterovirus 68 outbreak, a paralysis mystery
The New York Times
A nationwide outbreak of a respiratory virus last fall sent droves of children to emergency departments. The infections have now subsided, as researchers knew they would, but they have left behind a frightening mystery.
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Developing vaccines for insect-borne viruses
South Dakota State University via Infection Control Today
Vaccines developed using proteins rather than live viruses can help protect animals and subsequently humans from insect-borne viruses, according to Alan Young, chief scientific officer for Medgene Labs, an animal health company that develops therapeutics and diagnostics, including vaccines.
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Scientists spot mutation behind genetic form of heart failure
HealthDay News
Researchers have uncovered a major genetic risk for heart failure — a mutation affecting a key muscle protein that makes the heart less elastic. The mutation increases a person's risk of dilated cardiomyopathy. This is a form of heart failure in which the walls of the heart muscle are stretched out and become thinner, enlarging the heart and impairing its ability to pump blood efficiently, a new international study has revealed.
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Breast cancer: Rates of diagnosis and survival 'vary by race'
Medical News Today
A new study published in JAMA finds that among women in the U.S., the chance of being diagnosed with breast cancer in the early stages of the disease and the likelihood of surviving after such a diagnosis may be influenced by race and ethnicity, and this may be down to biological differences. According to the American Cancer Society, there will be around 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer — in which the cancer cells have spread beyond the breast ducts — diagnosed in the U.S. this year and more than 40,000 deaths from the disease.
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Tattoo like sensor can detect glucose levels without painful finger prick
ScienceDaily via American Chemical Society
The first ultra-thin, flexible device that sticks to skin like a rub-on tattoo can detect a person's glucose levels. The sensor has the potential to eliminate finger-pricking for many people with diabetes.
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Gene-based spit test shows promise in lung cancer detection
HealthDay News
Medicare indicated recently that it might soon cover CT scans to check longtime smokers for early lung cancer, and these types of scans are becoming more common. Now, an experimental test may help determine whether lung nodules detected by those scans are malignant or not, researchers say.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Curcumin's ability to fight Alzheimer's studied (Vanderbilt University Medical Center via ScienceDaily)
Who should regulate lab-developed tests? (Bloomberg BNA)
New test can identify both HIV and hepatitis (Health24)
California apple plant linked to deadly listeria outbreak (Reuters)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



ASCLS eNewsBytes

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Katina Smallwood, Senior Editor, 469.420.2675   
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