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Study: Less surgery, longer breast cancer survival
Medscape Medical News
Women with early-stage invasive breast cancer who undergo breast-conserving therapy have a higher rate of disease-specific survival than those who undergo mastectomy, according to an analysis published online in JAMA Surgery. However, experts caution that, as with all observational studies, the evidence is not as strong as that from a prospective randomized trial.
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Study: South Africa risks spreading totally drug-resistant TB
Reuters via Chicago Tribune
Patients with contagious and highly drug-resistant tuberculosis are being routinely discharged from hospitals across South Africa, exposing others in their communities to potentially deadly infections, researchers said. In a study in the medical journal The Lancet, they said the patients, with strains of TB known as extensively-drug resistant and totally drug resistant TB, have exhausted all available treatment options and are sent home.
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ASCLS-APHL webinar series offers hot topics for 2014!
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
CLIA Competency Assessment, Quality Indicators for Pre- and Post-analytical Lab Processes, and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Case Studies: Effective Resistance Detection and Reporting — three hot topics for 2014! P.A.C.E.®-approved. Go to the ASCLS website for more information.
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FDA allows marketing of Affymetrix to help diagnose developmental delays
FDA
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized for marketing the Affymetrix CytoScan Dx Assay, which can detect chromosomal variations that may be responsible for a child's developmental delay or intellectual disability. Based on a blood sample, the test can analyze the entire genome at one time and detect large and small chromosomal changes.
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Study IDs population of stem-like cells where HIV persists despite treatment
Ragon Institute, MIT and Harvard via Infection Control Today
Although antiviral therapy against HIV suppresses viral replication and allows infected individuals to live relatively healthy lives for many years, the virus persists in the body, and replication resumes if treatment is interrupted. Now investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard may have found where the virus hides — in a small group of recently identified T cells with stem-cell-like properties.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CellaVision Automates and Standardizes the Manual Differential

CellaVision introduces CellAtlas®, the perfect way to learn the basics of hematology cell morphology. This App for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch compliments our digital cell morphology portfolio, and is an educational tool to assist in the recognition and classification of blood cells, by utilizing mini-lectures and cell quizzes. More
 


NSA's controversial surveillance could help thwart outbreaks
The Medical Daily
For many, the massive digital surveillance of American society by the U.S. National Security Agency evinces deep-seated fears of authoritarian dystopia. The complexity of balancing individual liberties with the promise of security notwithstanding, the Obama administration might try to soften the government's image by touting another collective benefit of such intelligence gathering — early warning for infectious disease outbreaks.
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Scientists explore effect of exercise on prostate cancer patients
HealthDay News
A new study offers a possible explanation of how exercise may improve outcomes for prostate cancer patients. It's known that prostate cancer patients who are more active have a lower risk of cancer recurrence and cancer death than those who get little or no physical activity, but the reasons for this are unclear.
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Procalcitonin levels predict positive blood culture in sepsis patients
Reuters via Medscape Medical News
Procalcitonin testing can predict whether sepsis patients will have positive blood cultures, a new pilot study shows. Among 40 patients admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of sepsis, using a cutoff of 1.35 ng/ml identified all 10 who had positive blood cultures, Dr. Walid Saliba of Technion School of Medicine in Haifa, Israel, and colleagues found.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword SEPSIS


Patient-generated data likely to grow as meaningful use moves forward
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
Stage 3 of the meaningful use incentive program will almost certainly expand the collection and use of patient-generated data, which could give a boost to technology such as home-monitoring devices and patient portals. The Health IT Policy Committee, the body that provides policy guidance to the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, said it will recommend that hospitals and health systems be required to expand their collection and use of patient-generated data to qualify for stage 3 of the meaningful use incentive program.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Trust in Cleveland Clinic Laboratories
Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is a full-service, national reference lab dedicated to providing world class care. We have a dedicated staff of more than 1,300 employees, including board-certified subspecialty pathologists, PhDs, technologists, technicians, and support personnel. Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is proud to serve hospitals, outpatient facilities and physician offices worldwide. For more information, please visit clevelandcliniclabs.com.
 


Shanghai says medical worker dies from H7N9 bird flu infection
Bloomberg
A medical worker at a Shanghai hospital died from the H7N9 bird flu infection as the virus spreads further in China during the winter months. The 31-year-old man died on Jan. 18, according to a statement on the Shanghai Municipal Commission of Health and Family Planning website today. The city has reported seven cases of H7N9 infections this year, the statement said.
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Surgeon general report links more diseases, health problems to smoking
The Washington Post
Fifty years after the U.S. surgeon general first linked cigarette smoking to deadly diseases such as lung cancer and heart disease, his successors continue to add to the list of health problems associated with tobacco use. Smoking is a cause of liver cancer and colorectal cancer, the fourth-most-diagnosed form of the disease in the United States, Acting Surgeon General Boris D. Lushniak found in a report released recently.
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Study: Less surgery, longer breast cancer survival
Medscape Medical News
Women with early-stage invasive breast cancer who undergo breast-conserving therapy have a higher rate of disease-specific survival than those who undergo mastectomy, according to an analysis published online in JAMA Surgery. However, experts caution that the evidence is not as strong as that from a prospective randomized trial.

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Alternative breast cancer treatment cited in woman's death
ABC News
A Colorado woman died after injecting the supplement cesium chloride into her breast as an alternative treatment for breast cancer, according to a new case study published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. The 61-year-old woman had been taking cesium tablets and a handful of other vitamin supplements for more than a year.

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CDC names top 5 health threats in 2014
MedCity News
The disease detectives at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention named the top five global health threats they expect to tackle in 2014. Topping the list is the threat of the emergence and spread of new microbes, but several other threats are also on the CDC's radar.

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Novel tomography system may help guide therapy in early breast cancer
OncLive
Diffuse optical tomography is a novel, fast, safe and low-cost technique that uses near-infrared light to provide 3-D data on tissue vascularity without the use of radiation. Columbia University oncologists have been studying whether a system developed at the university can help guide physicians in evaluating chemotherapy and antiangiogenic treatment options for patients with early breast cancer.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Alternative breast cancer treatment cited in woman's death (ABC News)
1.2 billion reasons to celebrate: India set to be polio-free (The Guardian)
Multidrug resistance common in neonatal bacteremia (Medscape Medical News)
Chemical imaging brings cancer tissue analysis into the digital age (Imperial College London via R&D Magazine)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Custom-fit treatments for prostate cancer
The Wall Street Journal
In a bid to improve treatment for men with high-risk prostate cancer, some researchers want to take a page from the playbook for breast cancer. Medical scientists are working to develop strategies for treating prostate tumors that are tailored to individual patients, as is currently done for many women with breast cancer. Fresh advances in the understanding of prostate cancer suggest that some men with a high-risk form of the disease might benefit from more aggressive treatment.
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Unwanted side effect becomes advantage in photoacoustic imaging
R&D Magazine
Biomedical engineer Lihong Wang, Ph.D., and researchers in his laboratory work with lasers used in photoacoustic imaging for early cancer detection and a close look at biological tissue. But sometimes there are limitations to what they can do; and as engineers, they work to find a way around those limitations.
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