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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   January 27, 2015

 



Scientists find gene vital to central nervous system development
HealthCanal
Scientists have identified a gene that helps regulate how well nerves of the central nervous system are insulated, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report. Healthy insulation is vital for the speedy propagation of nerve cell signals. Using Washington University's zebra fish facility, graduate student Sarah Ackerman and senior author Kelly Monk, Ph.D., identified a gene that regulates how well the wiring of the central nervous system is insulated.
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New 'systems genetics' study identifies possible target for epilepsy treatment
Imperial College London via ScienceDaily
A single gene that coordinates a network of about 400 genes involved in epilepsy could be a target for new treatments, according to research. Epilepsy is a common and serious disease that affects around 50 million people worldwide. The mortality rate among people with epilepsy is two to three times higher than the general population.
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BPA exposure may change stem cells, lower sperm production
Scientific American
Bisphenol-A and other estrogenic compounds hamper development of the stem cells responsible for producing sperm in mice, which suggests such exposure could contribute to declining sperm counts in men, according to a new study. The study, published online in PLoS Genetics, is the first to suggest that low, brief exposures to BPA or other estrogens early in life can alter the stem cells responsible for producing sperm later in life.
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Measles outbreak raises question of vaccine exemptions
USA Today
VideoBriefThe Disneyland measles outbreak, which has grown to at least 50 people in five states and Mexico, is raising questions about state laws that allow unvaccinated children to attend school and stoking heated arguments about vaccination. Most of the cases are in California, according to the California Department of Public Health.
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E. coli may hold 1 of the keys to treating Parkinson's
University of Michigan via Infection Control Today
Researchers recently discovered a protein in E. coli that inhibits the accumulation of potentially toxic amyloids — a hallmark of diseases such as Parkinson's. Amyloids are formed by proteins that misfold and group together, and when amyloids assemble at the wrong place or time, they can damage brain tissue and cause cell death.
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Researchers develop rice-sized laser
Lab Manager
Princeton University researchers have built a rice grain-sized laser powered by single electrons tunneling through artificial atoms known as quantum dots. The tiny microwave laser, or "maser," is a demonstration of the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons.
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Antibiotics for traveler's diarrhea may spur growth of superbugs
HealthDay News
The overuse of antibiotics to treat travelers' diarrhea may contribute to the spread of drug-resistant superbugs, a new study suggests. Antibiotics should be used to treat travelers' diarrhea only in severe cases, said the study authors.
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Exhaled carbon dioxide alerts malaria mosquito to human presence
Medical News Today
A new study shows that human odor is not reliable enough to guide the malaria mosquito to its next blood meal. It seems that another trigger — exhaled carbon — is what guides the flying insect toward its next bite victim.
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