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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   February 03, 2015

 



Damaged DNA may stall patrolling molecule to initiate repair
Lab Manager
Sites where DNA is damaged may cause a molecule that slides along the DNA strand to scan for damage to slow on its patrol, delaying it long enough to recognize and initiate repair. The finding suggests that the delay itself may be the key that allows the protein molecule to find its target, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
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Sequencing genetic duplications could aid clinical interpretation
HealthCanal
Copy number variations are a major cause of birth defects, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disorders. Still, geneticists can definitively say how copy number variations, once discovered in someone's DNA, leads to one of these conditions in just a fraction of cases.
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CDC: More measles cases seen in January than in typical year
HealthDay News
The United States has seen more cases of measles in January than it usually does in an entire year, federal health officials said. A total of 84 cases in 14 states were reported between Jan. 1 and Jan. 28, Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said during a news conference.
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HIV cure 'likely lies in targeting dormant virus reserves'
Medical News Today
HIV inserts itself directly into the DNA of our immune cells. AIDS develops when the virus hijacks cell machinery and replicates itself, gradually weakening our immunity. Anti-HIV therapy interrupts the hijacking but does not touch intact virus that remains dormant. Now, a new study shows how lurking pools of dormant HIV may hold the secret to curing the disease.
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CDC issues guidance for labs managing and testing routine clinical specimens for Ebola
Infection Control Today
Due to a heightened concern in the United States about Ebola, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued guidance for clinical laboratories on testing needed for the assessment and care of patients for which Ebola is a concern, while minimizing risk to laboratory personnel. This document updates and replaces the previously issued guidance.
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Scientists find new target for most aggressive breast cancer
Medical News Today
A new study has linked deficiency in a gene that controls autophagy — a process that recycles cell waste — with triple-negative breast cancer. The researchers suggest increasing activity of the gene could be an effective way to treat patients with this most aggressive and stubborn cancer.
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New approach to detecting circulating tumor cells in blood uses acoustic sound waves and researchers are hopeful that the technology can lead to a medical laboratory test
DARK Daily
In many respects, the ability to separate and identify circulating tumor cells is one of the holy grails of cancer diagnostics. It is widely believed that a clinical laboratory test that can effectively identify circulating tumor cells would contribute to earlier detection of cancer and improved outcomes for caner patients.
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The future of fighting disease could be glycans
American Chemical Society
VideoBriefLike the candy shell on an M&M, every cell on the planet has a carbohydrate coating that holds special information. But decoding these coatings has proven elusive. Now Laura Kiessling, Ph.D., and her team at University of Wisconsin-Madison are trying to unlock the mystery of these coatings, known as glycans.
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How pancreatic cancer cells sidestep chemotherapy
Fox Chase Cancer Center
One reason pancreatic cancer can be so challenging to treat is because its cells have found a way to sidestep chemotherapy, research shows. They hijack the vitamin D receptor, normally associated with bone health, and repurposed it to repair the damage caused by chemotherapy.
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Study: Autism genes vary, even in affected siblings
HealthDay News
Siblings who share a diagnosis of autism often don't share the same autism-linked genes, according to a new study. Researchers previously have identified more than 100 genetic mutations that can make a person more susceptible to an autism spectrum disorder, said senior author Dr. Stephen Scherer, director of the Center for Applied Genomics at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto.
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Novel drug therapy lowers antibodies in kidney transplant patients
By Lynn Hetzler
A new preoperative drug therapy may reduce antibodies in kidney patients better than using traditional methods, according to a three-year clinical trial led by University of Cincinnati transplant researchers. The novel approach may increase patients' candidacy for kidney transplantation and decrease the chances of rejection. The study, entitled "Prospective Iterative Trial of Proteasome Inhibitor-Based Desensitization" and published in the latest issue of American Journal of Transplantation, shows promise.
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US proposes effort to analyze DNA from 1 million people
Reuters
The United States has proposed analyzing genetic information from more than 1 million American volunteers as part of a new initiative to understand human disease and develop medicines targeted to an individual's genetic makeup. At the heart of the "precision medicine" initiative, announced by President Barack Obama, is the creation of a pool of people — healthy and ill, men and women, old and young — who would be studied to learn how genetic variants affect health and disease.
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Stem cell-grown hair could help those with hair loss
CNET
It's been theorized for years, but now human stem cells have resulted in hair growth for the very first time. "We have developed a method using human pluripotent stem cells to create new cells capable of initiating human hair growth. The method is a marked improvement over current methods that rely on transplanting existing hair follicles from one part of the head to another," said Alexey Terskikh, Ph.D., associate professor in the Development, Aging and Regeneration Program at Sanford-Burnham.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Measles outbreak raises question of vaccine exemptions (USA Today)
Exhaled carbon dioxide alerts malaria mosquito to human presence (Medical News Today)
E. coli may hold 1 of the keys to treating Parkinson's (University of Michigan via Infection Control Today)
Scientists find gene vital to central nervous system development (HealthCanal)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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