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VIRTUALLY IMMEASURABLE DIFFERENCES CAN MAKE LITERALLY IMMEASURABLE DIFFERENCES

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C. difficile diarrhea in kids: Diagnosis, management, prevention
Medscape Medical News
The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection is increasing in the pediatric population. Over the past decade, there has been much interest in pediatric CDI. During this time, several important studies were conducted that clarify the epidemiology of CDI in children. This article will update the clinician on the diagnosis, management and prevention of CDI in children.
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Long-living breast stem cells give clues to cancer cells of origin
Medical News Today
Researchers in Australia have found that breast stem cells and their "daughters" have a longer life than previously believed. This newly discovered longer lifespan suggests that these cells could carry damage or genetic defects earlier in life that eventually lead to cancer decades later.
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How to avert an antibiotic apocalypse
Forbes
According to a recent analysis in Nature Biotechnology, cancer drugs have only a 12.3 percent chance of approval when entering early clinical trials, the lowest of any disease area other than heart disease. Yet more drugs are in mid-to late-stage development for cancer than anything else. The reason comes down to price, the size of the market and the fact that regulators have bent over backward to find ways to get the drugs approved quickly, enticing small biotechs into the field.
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HIV/AIDS discovery shows how wrong assumptions can be
Forbes
Until recently, clinicians and scientists believed the human body went after the CD4+ T helper cells that were most infected by HIV. They assumed destroying the cells with the highest levels of the virus was the body’s way of trying to limit the disease. But new research contradicts this belief. Immunologist Warner Greene and his laboratory group at the Gladstone Institutes discovered that — 95 percent of the time — the body destroys the less infected, resting cells.
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New test for pancreatic cancer based on microRNAs in blood
Medscape Medical News
A new test for pancreatic cancer based on detecting microRNAs in whole blood is described by researchers from Denmark in JAMA. The team, led by Nicolai Schultz, M.D., Ph.D., from Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, developed 2 novel panels of microRNAs, which are small noncoding single-stranded RNAs (about 18 to 24 nucleotides) that act on target genes at the messenger RNA level to promote oncogenesis.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CellaVision Automates and Standardizes the Manual Differential

CellaVision introduces CellAtlas®, the perfect way to learn the basics of hematology cell morphology. This App for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch compliments our digital cell morphology portfolio, and is an educational tool to assist in the recognition and classification of blood cells, by utilizing mini-lectures and cell quizzes. More
 


1,500-year-old plague victims shed light on disease origins
The Guardian
Scientists have sequenced the genome of the pathogen that caused one of the most devastating plagues in human history, shedding light on where the disease came from and how it spread. The Plague of Justinian occurred in the sixth century AD and resulted in more than 100 million deaths by some estimates. Named after the Byzantine emperor Justinian I, the outbreak was one of the first recorded plague pandemics. Scientists have previously analyzed DNA samples taken from plague victims to determine that the Plague of Justinian was likely caused by Yersinia pestis, the bacterium also responsible for the Black Death.
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Study: Breath test may detect signs of lung cancer
HealthDay News via WebMD
A simple breath test might reveal if a person has early-stage lung cancer, according to a new study. Researchers tested the exhaled breath of people with suspicious lung lesions that were detected on CT scans. The breath was tested for levels of four cancer-specific substances, called "carbonyls."
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Artificial bone marrow could be used to treat leukemia
LiveScience
For decades, doctors have been treating leukemia patients by transplanting stem cells from people with healthy bone marrow. But even though transplants can be a fairly effective treatment, there aren't enough tissue donors to treat every leukemia patient. Now, researchers are taking the first steps toward making bone marrow in a lab: They are growing stem cells in a setting that mimics the natural environment of bone marrow.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword LEUKEMIA


US safer when CDC works with other countries to fight infectious diseases
Infection Control Today
Pilot projects between CDC and Uganda and CDC and Vietnam have resulted in improvements in disease detection and response that may serve as a model for increasing global health security in the rest of the world, according to an article in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Global health security — keeping the U.S. and the world safe and secure from infectious disease threats — is achieved by preventing, detecting and responding to outbreaks as early and effectively as possible.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Trust in Cleveland Clinic Laboratories
Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is a full-service, national reference lab dedicated to providing world class care. We have a dedicated staff of more than 1,300 employees, including board-certified subspecialty pathologists, PhDs, technologists, technicians, and support personnel. Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is proud to serve hospitals, outpatient facilities and physician offices worldwide. For more information, please visit clevelandcliniclabs.com.
 


WHO: We can't beat cancer with drugs alone; prevention crucial
Reuters
Governments must make better use of vaccines and preventative public health policies in the fight against cancer as treatment alone cannot stem the disease, a World Health Organization agency said. The WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer said cancer was growing "at an alarming pace" worldwide and new strategies were needed to curb the sometimes fatal and often costly disease.
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Exciting technological advances in oncology
By Rosemary Sparacio
The incidence of cancer is increasing in the U.S., fueled by 10,000 baby boomers reaching 65 each day. With that realization, it is estimated that there could be an increase in cancer diagnoses, by 67 percent between 2010 and 2030. The result of these alarming numbers is that oncology has been pushed to the forefront in the healthcare field. Fortunately, the technology and research to detect and treat various kinds of cancers has increased as well. Some of this technology is still in the early, yet promising stages.
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New cream with silver nanoparticles could block HIV transmission
Medical News Today
But new research has detailed the creation of a cream that has proved effective against transmission of human immunodeficiency virus in laboratory tests. Previous research from the University of Texas, in collaboration with the University of Monterrey in Mexico, found that silver nanoparticles may be able to stop transmission of HIV.
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C. difficile diarrhea in kids: Diagnosis, management, prevention
Medscape Medical News
The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection is increasing in the pediatric population. Over the past decade, several important studies were conducted that clarify the epidemiology of CDI in children. This article will update the clinician on the diagnosis, management and prevention of CDI in children.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Dogs carry the oldest known living cancer
National Geographic
Canines are in a rare category when it comes to cancer: They and Tasmanian devils are the only two animals that can transmit it from one individual to another. A new genetic study reveals that the dog form of the cancer, which causes genital tumors, is 11,000 years old — making it the oldest continuously living cancer.

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CDC names top 5 health threats in 2014
MedCity News
The disease detectives at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention named the top five global health threats they expect to tackle in 2014. Topping the list is the threat of the emergence and spread of new microbes, but several other threats are also on the CDC's radar.

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Advanced radiation therapy for head and neck cancers may be better than traditional radiation
Virtual Medical Centre
Patients with head and neck cancer who are treated with an advanced form of radiation therapy may experience fewer side effects and be less likely to die from their disease than patients who receive standard radiation therapy. That is the finding of an analysis published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study establishes so-called intensity-modulated radiation therapy as both a safe and beneficial treatment for patients with head and neck cancer.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Dogs carry the oldest known living cancer (National Geographic)
Waived testing: The last mountain (Advance for Administrators of the Laboratory)
Influenza: Fact or fallacy? (Medscape Medical News)
Fever treatments may cause more flu deaths (LiveScience)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


European injectional anthrax cases linked to strains from 2009 outbreak
Healio
New cases of injectional anthrax reported in Western Europe appear to be genetically related to strains seen in a previous drug-related anthrax outbreak, recent study data found. Additionally, the resurfacing of drug abuse-related anthrax suggests that heroin use may act as an ongoing means of transmission for Bacillus anthracis in Western Europe, according to researchers from Germany and Arizona who collaborated on this project funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate.
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Yoga may help overcome fatigue after breast cancer
NPR
Exercise helps recovery after cancer treatment, but fatigue can make working out hard. Yoga can help reduce fatigue for breast cancer survivors, a study finds. It's one of a growing number of efforts using randomized controlled trials to see if the ancient practice offers medical benefits.
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CDC: Cruise virus outbreak one of worst in 20 years
NBC News
Federal health officials confirmed that norovirus was the culprit that sickened nearly 700 people on a cruise ship in January, and said it was one of the biggest norovirus outbreaks in 20 years. At least 178 people on board became ill during the cruise, according to the cruise line and the CDC.
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