This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive  Media Kit

Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   February 10, 2015

 



New study sheds light on cancer stem cell regulation
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute via Medical Xpress
Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have discovered a precise stem cell signaling process that can lead to intestinal tumors if disrupted. The findings add to our understanding of how stem cells give rise to tumors and identify specific stem cell molecules that may be targeted to prevent the onset, progression and recurrence of intestinal cancers.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Scientists discover organism that hasn't evolved in more than 2 billion years
Lab Manager
An international team of scientists has discovered the greatest absence of evolution ever reported — a type of deep-sea microorganism that appears not to have evolved over more than 2 billion years. But the researchers say that the organisms' lack of evolution actually supports Charles Darwin's theory of evolution.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


CDC: Ebola virus sent out of high-security lab was likely dead
Reuters
An internal investigation of an Ebola incident at a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention laboratory in December found that samples sent to a lower-security lab were "unlikely" to have contained live virus and posed no threat to staff, the CDC said. The close call followed mishaps involving anthrax and a deadly strain of bird flu, raising questions about how the agency handles the world's deadliest pathogens.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Advance your degree!
- Completely Online MLT to Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory   Science
- Remain in your current employment
- Individualized plans of study designed to fit your personal needs

Visit our website for more information, or contact the CLS program by Email or 402-559-6673.
 


Reactivation of HBV can be prevented, treated during immunosuppressive drug therapy
American Gastroenterological Association via Infection Control Today
Long-term immunosuppressive therapy can cause the hepatitis B virus to become active, even in patients who are not aware that they are infected with the virus. A new guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association provides guidance to physicians and patients who use immunosuppressive agents for the treatment of a variety of disorders, including gastrointestinal, dermatologic, neurologic and rheumatologic, among others.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




New source of cells for modeling malaria
MIT News Office via Health Canal
In 2008, the World Health Organization announced a global effort to eradicate malaria, which kills about 800,000 people every year. As part of that goal, scientists are trying to develop new drugs that target the malaria parasite during the stage when it infects the human liver, which is crucial because some strains of malaria can lie dormant in the liver for several years before flaring up.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Study: Lyme disease more serious, costly than believed
HealthDay News
Prolonged illness in Americans with Lyme disease is more widespread, serious and costly than previously believed, a new study suggests. The study authors — from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health — found that Lyme disease has a much greater impact on patients and the health system, costing up to $1.3 billion a year to treat.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Trust in Cleveland Clinic Laboratories
Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is a full-service, national reference lab dedicated to providing world class care. We have a dedicated staff of more than 1,300 employees, including board-certified subspecialty pathologists, PhDs, technologists, technicians, and support personnel. Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is proud to serve hospitals, outpatient facilities and physician offices worldwide. For more information, please visit clevelandcliniclabs.com.
 


Breast cancer: 2 new genetic risk factors uncovered
Medical News Today
Collaboration between dozens of worldwide cancer research institutes has added to the ever-improving understanding of breast cancer genetics and personal profiling of the disease by unearthing two new genetic variants associated with a higher risk for the women carrying them. The two genetic susceptibility biomarkers identified by the huge study are specific to a type of hormone-dependent breast cancer — estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, the most common form.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Miss an issue of the eNewsBytes? Click here to visit the eNewsBytes archive page.


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Web-based competency testing
A powerful web-based program for proficiency testing of blood and body-fluid differentials. Instant access anywhere! Try it out FREE now. MORE
Get to Know Sekisui Diagnostics

We offer >65 reagents for most automated clinical chemistry systems with over one billion chemistry tests performed globally each year using our products.
MORE


Why do new strains of HIV spread slowly?
PLOS via ScienceDaily
Most HIV epidemics are still dominated by the first strain that entered a particular population. New research offers an explanation of why the global mixing of HIV variants is so slow.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    HIV cure 'likely lies in targeting dormant virus reserves' (Medical News Today)
CDC issues guidance for labs managing and testing routine clinical specimens for Ebola (Infection Control Today)
CDC: More measles cases seen in January than in typical year (HealthDay News)
How pancreatic cancer cells sidestep chemotherapy (Fox Chase Cancer Center)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



ASCLS eNewsBytes

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Katina Smallwood, Senior Editor, 469.420.2675   
Contribute news


This edition of the ASCLS eNewsBytes was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Join ASCLS and we will subscribe you -- it's free!

Recent issues

Feb. 3, 2015
Jan. 27, 2015
Jan. 20, 2015
Jan. 13, 2015






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063