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Vitamin C may boost chemotherapy
Medical News Today
A new study suggests giving some cancer patients high doses of vitamin C intravenously — as opposed to orally — alongside conventional chemotherapy, may help kill cancer cells and also reduce some of its toxic side effects. Reporting their findings in Science Translational Medicine, researchers from the University of Kansas Medical Center describe how they tested the approach in cells, animals and humans.
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Lyme disease rash can help predict how bacteria spreads through body
Cell Press via ScienceDaily
Lyme disease is often evident by a rash on the skin, but infections do not always produce similar rashes. This can make it difficult to detect the disease early, when antibiotic treatment is most effective. Researchers describe a new mathematical model that captures the interactions between disease-causing bacteria and the host immune response that affect the appearance of a rash and the spread of infection.
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Noninfluenza vaccination rates remain low among adults
Medscape Medical News
In 2012, only 20 percent of adults were current on their recommended pneumococcal vaccinations, and only 64.2 percent were up-to-date with their tetanus shots, report Walter W. Williams, M.D., from the Immunization Services Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and colleagues. Coverage with the vaccine against hepatitis A was especially low, at only 12.2 percent of adults aged 19 to 49 years, and just a tad more than a third of adults aged 19 to 49 years (35.3 percent) were fully protected against hepatitis B, the investigators report in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
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30 years later: Are we any closer to a cure for AIDS?
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Human immunodeficiency virus was first discovered in 1983. In 1984, HIV was definitively linked to acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients and to groups whose members were at high risk for developing AIDS. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 1.1 million persons aged 13 years and older are living with HIV infection. Over the past decade, the number of people living with HIV has increased, while the annual number of new HIV infections has remained relatively stable. But are researchers any closer to finding a cure now than when the HIV/AIDS connection was established 30 years ago?
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Acoustic microscopy may push development of better biomarkers for arterial plaque
Reuters Health via Medscape Medical News
Existing plaque biomarkers don't distinguish between types of plaques or mechanical properties that could reveal their risk to the patient. But research underway in mice could lead to non-invasive imaging with targeted ultrasound contrast agents that could identify regions at risk for rupture, researchers said recently.
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Running might beat walking for breast cancer survivors
HealthDay News
Exercise has long been credited with both reducing the risk of breast cancer and surviving the disease. Now a new study suggests, but doesn't prove, that breast cancer survivors who run have an even greater survival edge than those who walk.
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Taking the 'waste' out of biomedical research
Science
According to a series published in The Lancet, biomedical research is doing a poor job of helping patients. Very little research ever reaches the bedside. According to the series, one of the biggest reasons is waste.
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New method for reprogramming cells
The Scientist
Current approaches for turning differentiated adult cells back into a stem cell-like state involve messing with the nucleus in one way or another — either swapping out nuclear contents, a process called nuclear transfer, or inducing the expression of pluripotency genes. In two papers published in Nature recently, researchers have developed an entirely different technique, this one based on exposure to environmental stimuli, including mechanical stress or a low pH.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    HIV/AIDS discovery shows how wrong assumptions can be (Forbes)
1,500-year-old plague victims shed light on disease origins (The Guardian)
C. difficile diarrhea in kids: Diagnosis, management, prevention (Medscape Medical News)
Artificial bone marrow could be used to treat leukemia (LiveScience)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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New study raises questions about antioxidant use in lung cancer patients
The Washington Post
The supermarket labels touting the benefits of antioxidant-rich foods such as frozen berries and green tea are so ubiquitous that many people assume that taking extra doses in the form of supplements is beneficial. But a growing body of evidence, including a study published recently, suggests that high doses may do more harm than good in patients with certain types of cancer.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
Vitamin C may boost chemotherapy
Medical News Today
A new study suggests giving some cancer patients high doses of vitamin C intravenously — as opposed to orally — alongside conventional chemotherapy, may help kill cancer cells and also reduce some of its toxic side effects.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
HIV/AIDS discovery shows how wrong assumptions can be
Forbes
Until recently, clinicians and scientists believed the human body went after the CD4+ T helper cells that were most infected by HIV. They assumed destroying the cells with the highest levels of the virus was the body’s way of trying to limit the disease. But new research contradicts this belief.

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Waived testing: The last mountain
Advance for Administrators of the Laboratory
We know that Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments have defined waived tests as laboratory procedures which employ methodologies that are so simple and accurate as to render the likelihood of erroneous results negligible and which pose no reasonable risk of harm to the patient if the test is performed incorrectly.

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New China bird flu a reminder of mutant virus risk
Reuters
The death of a woman in China from a strain of bird flu previously unknown in humans is a reminder of the ever-present potential pandemic threat from mutating animal viruses, scientists said recently. The new strain, called H10N8, had infected only two people. But the fact it has jumped from birds to humans is an important warning, they said.
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HPV vaccine doesn't promote riskier sexual behavior in teens
UPI
Research has debunked parents' concerns that the HPV vaccine encourages risky sexual behavior in teens. In addition, women who had not had sex when vaccinated were not more likely to start having sex post-vaccination, according to research coming out of the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and published recently in the journal Pediatrics.
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Poll: Americans excited over DNA breakthroughs, but worry about implications
redOrbit
A new poll from the Huffington Post and YouGov finds that although most Americans are excited by the possibility of the scientific breakthroughs made possible by DNA research, many of them worry that research could go too far — and the scientists could begin "playing God." The Huffington Post reports that the results show the public is more optimistic about the possibilities than pessimistic about potential negative effects. The findings also reveal that Americans believe genetic research should have limits.
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