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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   Feb. 12, 2013

 



Study: More mammograms could mean more problems
for older women

Los Angeles Times
Researchers examined records of about 140,000 women ages 66 to 89 who had mammograms between 1999 and 2006. Some of the women had mammograms every year, and some of them had them every other year. It turned out that having annual mammograms did not reduce women's risk of being diagnosed with an aggressive breast cancer, as might have been expected.
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Peptide could treat cancers, neurological disorders, infectious diseases
UT Southwestern Medical Center via Science Blog
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center scientists have synthesized a peptide that shows potential for pharmaceutical development into agents for treating infections, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer through an ability to induce a cell-recycling process called autophagy. Autophagy is a fundamental recycling process in which intracellular enzymes digest unneeded and broken parts of the cell into their individual building blocks, which are then reassembled into new parts.
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Small-molecule drug drives cancer cells to suicide
Nature
Cancer researchers have pinned down a molecule that can kick-start the body's own tumor-destroying systems, triggering cell death in cancerous but not healthy tissue in mice. The molecule, TIC10, activates the gene for a protein called TRAIL (tumor-necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), which has long been a target for cancer researchers looking for drugs that would avoid the debilitating effects of conventional therapies.
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Study: Social media may prove useful in prevention of HIV, STDs
Infection Control Today
Facebook and other social networking technologies could serve as effective tools for preventing HIV infection among at-risk groups, new UCLA research suggests. In a study published in the February issue of the peer-reviewed journal Sexually Transmitted Diseases, researchers found that African-American and Latino men who have sex with men voluntarily used health-related Facebook groups, which were created by the study's investigators, to discuss such things as HIV knowledge, stigma and prevention and ultimately to request at-home HIV testing kits.

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Spread of hepatitis C pinpointed
BBC
Scientists say they have, for the first time, worked out the pattern of spread of hepatitis C, showing early diagnosis is key to preventing epidemics. A study in injecting drug users in Greece indicated that each infected person spread the disease to 20 others — 10 of these in the first two years.

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Study recommends new tools to improve global mapping of infectious disease
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis via Medical Xpress
Since the mid-19th century, maps have helped elucidate the deadly mysteries of diseases like cholera and yellow fever. Yet today's global mapping of infectious diseases is considerably unreliable and may do little to inform the control of potential outbreaks, according to a new systematic mapping review of all clinically important infectious diseases known to humans.

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Study: Multiple factors affect HIV prognosis
Yale Daily News
In a major advancement for the field of HIV treatment, a new study has identified a more accurate method of suggesting prognosis for HIV patients. The new method, called the Veterans Aging Cohort Study index, takes into account factors such as hemoglobin level, platelet count and comorbidity.
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Cells forged from human skin show promise in treating multiple sclerosis, myelin disorders
University of Rochester Medical Center via ScienceDaily
A study in the journal Cell Stem Cell shows that human brain cells created by reprogramming skin cells are highly effective in treating myelin disorders, a family of diseases that includes multiple sclerosis and rare childhood disorders called pediatric leukodystrophies. The study is the first successful attempt to employ human induced pluripotent stem cells to produce a population of cells that are critical to neural signaling in the brain.
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Confirmed: MammaPrint predicts treatment in breast cancer
Medscape Medical News
The first prospective trial of the 70-gene-signature MammaPrint breast cancer test shows that it can help determine which breast cancer patients can forgo adjuvant systemic treatment. The results of the Microarray Prognostics in Breast Cancer study were published online in the International Journal of Cancer.
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Study: Social media may prove useful in prevention of HIV, STDs
Infection Control Today
Facebook and other social networking technologies could serve as effective tools for preventing HIV infection among at-risk groups, new UCLA research suggests. In a study published in the February issue of the peer-reviewed journal Sexually Transmitted Diseases, researchers found that African-American and Latino men who have sex with men voluntarily used health-related Facebook groups, which were created by the study's investigators, to discuss such things as HIV knowledge, stigma and prevention and ultimately to request at-home HIV testing kits.
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Cancer deaths fall for African-American men, disparities remain
CNN
VideoBrief The latest report on cancer among African-Americans shows a good-news, bad-news scenario. While racial gaps are closing for some types of cancers, including fewer cancer deaths among African-American men, disparities are increasing for some cancers that can be found through routine screenings.
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Research finds link between HPV, epilepsy
KYW-TV
Philadelphia researchers have found a link between a form of epilepsy and a common cause of cervical cancer. Dr. Peter Crino, professor of neurology at Temple University School of Medicine, says Shriners Hospital pediatric researchers at Temple have discovered evidence linking human papillomavirus 16, which causes cervical cancer, to a common and difficult-to-treat form of epilepsy in children and adults.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study recommends new tools to improve global mapping of infectious disease (Medical Xpress)
Consumer Reports tackles cancer screening tests (ABC News)
Spread of hepatitis C pinpointed (BBC)
Hops, key to flavor in beer, may prove useful in new drugs (Univ. of Washington via HealthDay)
Researchers: Vitamin D holds promise in battling a deadly breast cancer (HealthCanal)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Scientists identify taste stem cells on the tongue
Food Navigator
The discovery of until now "elusive" taste stem cells on the tongue will help researchers and industry better understand the complexities of human taste, say researchers. The breakthrough, by researchers at the Monell Chemical Sciences Center, will help to develop new techniques to grow and manipulate fully functional taste cells for use in research and clinical treatments, say the scientists behind the finding.
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Protecting against cervical cancer
Voice of America
A new immunization campaign gets underway soon to protect 180 thousand girls in developing countries from cervical cancer, the GAVI Alliance announced. The alliance has chosen eight developing countries to begin administering the HPV vaccine: Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Niger, Sierra Leone and Tanzania in sub-Saharan Africa and Laos in Asia.
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