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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   March 03, 2015

 



Method for mapping neuron clusters developed
New York University via ScienceDaily
A method for identifying clusters of neurons that work in concert to guide the behavior has been developed by researchers. Their findings address a long-standing mystery about the organization of the prefrontal cortex — one of the most recently evolved parts of the primate brain that underlies complex cognitive functions.
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March 19 webinar: Laboratory Monitoring of the New Oral Anticoagulants
ASCLS
Donna Castellone of New York Presbyterian-Columbia will be presenting an overview of these drugs, their intended use and some cases that demonstrate how laboratories can respond to this challenging need. For more information and to register, go to www.ascls.org/webinars. ASCLS members receive a discounted registration rate.
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Could an HIV drug beat strep throat, flesh-eating bacteria?
American Chemical Society via EurekAlert!
With antibiotic resistance on the rise, scientists are looking for innovative ways to combat bacterial infections. The pathogen that causes conditions from strep throat to flesh-eating disease is among them, but scientists have now found a tool that could help them fight it: a drug approved to treat HIV. Their work, appearing in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, could someday lead to new treatments.
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Small molecule helps get stem cells to sites of disease and damage
Brigham and Women's Hospital via Medical Xpress
Bioengineers from Brigham and Women's Hospital with collaborators at the pharmaceutical company Sanofi have identified small molecules that can be used to program stem cells to home in on sites of damage, disease and inflammation. The techniques used to find and test these small molecules may represent important tools in advancing cell-based therapy, offering a new strategy for delivering cells to the right locations in the body.
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Researchers create nanoparticle that targets cancer to optimize MRI scanning; New technology has potential to reduce number of tissue biopsies and pathology testing
DARK Daily
Even as pathologists are working to develop more sensitive and accurate diagnostic tests for cancer, similar efforts are underway in radiology and imaging. In fact, one research team has developed a self-assembling nanoparticle that can adhere to cancer cells, thus making them visible in MRI scans and possibly eliminate the need for invasive tissue biopsies.
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TSRI team shows how rare antibody targets Ebola and Marburg viruses
Scripps Research Institute via Infection Control Today
Marburg virus is Ebola's deadly cousin. The virus is up to 90 percent lethal, and doctors are desperate for tools to fight it. Now scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have captured the first images showing how immune molecules bind to a site on the surface of Marburg virus. The images are like enemy reconnaissance, showing scientists how to target the virus's weak spots with future treatments.
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Nasal flu vaccines may be safe for kids with egg allergies
Reuters
Nasal-spray flu vaccines appear to be safe for children over age 2 who have egg allergies or asthma, say U.K. researchers. No systemic or severe allergic reactions were seen among 282 egg-allergic children who received the vaccine. Eight kids had mild reactions, such as a runny nose, and 26 reported coughing or wheezing up to three days after the vaccine.
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Molecule that provides cellular energy found key to aggressive thyroid cancer
Mayo Clinic via Health Canal
Cancer researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida, have identified a molecule they say is important to survival of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma — a lethal tumor with no effective therapies. The molecule also seems to play a role in a wide range of cancers. In an online issue of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, they identify Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 as an oncogenic enzyme that when inhibited and paired with another targeted drug effectively shuts down ATC cell growth and induces cell death.
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Peptide developed that may slow Parkinson's disease
Medical News Today
New research suggests it may be possible to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease using a man-made peptide that stops the formation of faulty protein fibrils that kill the brain cells that produce dopamine. Estimates suggest up to 10 million people worldwide are living with Parkinson's disease — a progressive neurological disorder caused by the loss of brain cells that release dopamine, a chemical that is important for conveying messages that control movement.
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Study: Gene mutations tied to leukemia rise with age
HealthDay News
For many people, an increase in genetic mutations that could trigger leukemia seems to be an inevitable part of aging, a new study finds. The British researchers looked specifically at mutations in blood stem cells.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Chickenpox virus may be linked to serious condition in the elderly (American Academy of Neurology via Infection Control Today)
New insight on how brain performs 'mental time travel' (Lab Manager)
New trend in use of real-time management dashboards gives clinical laboratories ability to achieve improved quality and faster test TAT (DARK Daily)
Stem cell breakthrough revolutionizes surgery (Newsmax Health)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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