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New Forensic Application Notebook Available


Download the latest applications for Forensic Toxicology today in one handy notebook.

 



Google Glass could help stop public health threats around world
American Chemical Society
The much-talked-about Google Glass — the eyewear with computer capabilities — could potentially save lives, especially in isolated or far-flung locations, say scientists. They are reporting development of a Google Glass app that takes a picture of a diagnostic test strip and sends the data to computers, which then rapidly beam back a diagnostic report to the user. The information also could help researchers track the spread of diseases around the world.
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CLMA's KnowledgeLab 2014: Connect. Grow. Lead.
CLMA
The Clinical Laboratory Management Association's premier educational event, KnowledgeLab 2014, May 4-7 in Las Vegas, provides a forum for laboratory leaders from all over the world to connect with their peers, grow their knowledge and lead the charge to address key challenges in the laboratory.

Register on or before March 28 to save up to $150!

Access the best in laboratory management training and information.

  • Daily general sessions featuring Michael Astion, M.D., Ph.D., Seattle Children's Hospital and Robert Michel, The Dark Report
  • Education covering essential topics
  • Pre-conference workshop presented by the Joint Commission on Tracer Methodology
  • The CLMA Leadership Curriculum — a deep dive into leadership skill development for those who are new to the management role and for current leaders who wish to enhance their proficiency

  • Register for KnowledgeLab 2014 today and find new ideas and new approaches to implement in your own laboratory.

    Hear why you should attend KnowledgeLab 2014. Hear why Ellen Dijkman Dulkes, KnowledgeLab 2014 Program Committee Chair, thinks you should attend KnowledgeLab this May!

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    March 6 webinar: Quality Indicators for Pre- & Post-analytical Lab Processes
    American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
    In this one-hour webinar you will learn an approach for selecting and developing pre-analytic and post-analytic process indicators so that your laboratory can assess and control key activities that contribute to quality laboratory results. For more information and to register your site, go to www.ascls.org/webinars. ASCLS members register at a discount with code wsdc14.
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    SPONSORED CONTENT


    Medical Laboratory Professionals Week — April 20-26
    American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
    It is time to celebrate and educate others about what YOU do! Start planning your celebration now. Purchase official logo items and more. For more information go to www.ascls.org/MLPW.
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    CDC: Vaccines prevent millions of infections, save billions in costs
    HealthDay News via Philly.com
    Childhood vaccines have the potential to prevent 42,000 early deaths and 20 million cases of disease among Americans born in a given year, according to a new analysis. The investigation of children born in 2009 found that vaccinations save billions of dollars in both direct and indirect healthcare costs. But in a second study, researchers also discovered that efforts to educate parents about the effectiveness of vaccines are falling short.
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    Breast cancer spread may be reduced by silencing a gene
    Medical News Today
    Myoferlin, a protein only recently linked to cancer, may help breast cancer cells transform so they can escape tumors and migrate to new sites. When researchers implanted mice with breast cancer cells that couldn't make the protein because its gene was switched off, the cells did not transform into the type that migrates.
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    Study: Vinegar a key to killing drug-resistant TB
    U.S. News & World Report
    One of the world's oldest known disinfectants — and favorite salad dressings — may prove even stronger than previously thought. An international research team has found that vinegar — or, more specifically, the active ingredient in vinegar — can kill mycobacteria, including a highly drug-resistant form of tuberculosis.
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    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword TUBERCULOSIS


    Study: Stethoscopes are more germy than docs' palms
    NBC News
    Healthcare workers' hands are notorious for spreading germs in hospitals, but a new study suggests that the stethoscopes around their necks may be just as bad. Researchers in Switzerland found that the diaphragms of stethoscopes were more contaminated with the superbug MRSA than the palm of the hand.
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    Women's health harmed as medical studies ignore gender
    Bloomberg Businessweek
    Scientists continue to neglect gender in medical research, endangering women's health by focusing on males in studies that shape the treatment of disease, a report found. The lack of attention to gender differences occurs at all stages of research, from lab to doctor's office, according to the report released by the Connors Center for Women's Health at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health at George Washington University in Washington.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Mysterious polio-like illness affects kids in California (USA Today)
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    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    Tick test for persistent Lyme disease tried in humans
    Reuters
    A small experiment to see whether uninfected ticks could "diagnose" a lingering Lyme infection in people produced modest results, researchers say. DNA from the Lyme parasite, but not live parasites themselves, were transmitted to the ticks from just two people out of two dozen who had persistent Lyme symptoms despite treatment.
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    Mutation kills off gene responsible for Type 2 diabetes
    Counsel & Heal
    A rare mutations in a gene has been identified by researchers at the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital that can reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The mutations are also effective for people who have risk factors like obesity and old age. The research might lead to the development of a drug that could mimic the protective effect of these mutations.
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    TRENDING ARTICLE
    Google Glass could help stop public health threats around world
    American Chemical Society
    The much-talked-about Google Glass could potentially save lives, especially in isolated or far-flung locations, say scientists. They are reporting development of a Google Glass app that takes a picture of a diagnostic test strip and sends the data to computers, which then rapidly beam back a diagnostic report to the user.

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    read more
    Mysterious polio-like illness affects kids in California
    USA Today
    A mysterious polio-like syndrome has affected as many as 25 California children, leaving them with paralyzed limbs and little hope of recovery. California is working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta to see if there are cases outside California. So far none have been reported.

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    30 years later: Are we any closer to a cure for AIDS?
    By Dorothy L. Tengler
    Over the past decade, the number of people living with HIV has increased, while the annual number of new HIV infections has remained relatively stable. But are researchers any closer to finding a cure now than when the HIV/AIDS connection was established 30 years ago?

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    Journals accepted fake research papers generated by computer program
    Nature World News
    More than 120 computer-generated "gibberish" research papers are being removed from the archives of scientific journal publishers Springer and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers after a French computer scientist determined the papers were fakes. The bogus research papers, it turns out, were created by an automated word generation program that can string random, seemingly sophisticated words together in plausible English syntax.
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    Microbes more likely to adhere to tube walls when water is moving
    PhysOrg
    In a surprising new finding, researchers have discovered that bacterial movement is impeded in flowing water, enhancing the likelihood that the microbes will attach to surfaces. The new work could have implications for the study of marine ecosystems and for our understanding of how infections take hold in medical devices.
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    What government can do about the shortage of science and tech skills
    Nextgov
    Experts from both the public and private sector are coming together to develop new products and prototypes to help address the shortages of workers in science, technology, engineering and math fields. Entrepreneurs, data manipulators, human resource experts, federal data owners and government leaders met to brainstorm ways of using open data to measure and improve the quality, skills, diversity and career paths of employees in STEM fields.
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