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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   Mar. 5, 2013

 



Researchers: Toddler cured of HIV
CNN
VideoBrief It's a potential game changer in the fight against HIV, and doctors say it happened almost by accident. A baby with the virus that causes AIDS was given high doses of three antiretroviral drugs within 30 hours of her birth. Doctors knew the mother was HIV positive and administered the drugs in hopes of controlling the virus. Two years later, there is no evidence of HIV in the child's blood.
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Targeting cancer with new microscopy technique
University of Akron via redOrbit
For scientists to improve cancer treatments with targeted therapeutic drugs, they need to be able to see proteins prevalent in the cancer cells. This has been impossible, until now. Thanks to a new microscopy technique, University of Akron researcher Dr. Adam Smith, assistant professor of chemistry, has observed how clusters of epidermal growth factor receptor — a protein abundant in lung and colon cancers, glioblastoma and others — malfunctions in cancer cells.
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Sunlight-powered prototype sterilizes medical equipment
MIT via Laboratory Equipment
Using sunlight, researchers and students at MIT are trying to change how medical equipment is sterilized in remote clinics — and a pilot project in Nicaragua has begun to show promising results. In that nation, a mostly rural population of 6 million is served by some 11 hospitals, dozens of health centers, and some 1,300 "health posts" that provide emergency care, obstetric services and the occasional baby delivery. Most of these posts, staffed by nurse practitioners, either lack equipment to sterilize surgical tools and bandages or have kerosene-powered autoclaves.
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Advanced breast cancer in young American women: On the rise?
Medscape Medical News
In the past 30 years, there has been a small but significant increase in the incidence of advanced breast cancer in American women 25 to 39 years of age, according to a study published in JAMA. During the same period, there was no increase in advanced disease in older women, according to the researchers, led by Rebecca H. Johnson, MD, from the Seattle Children's Hospital and the University of Washington.
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Team 1st to grow liver stem cells in culture, demonstrate therapeutic benefit
Oregon Health & Science University via Medical Xpress
For decades scientists around the world have attempted to regenerate primary liver cells known as hepatocytes because of their numerous biomedical applications, including hepatitis research, drug metabolism and toxicity studies, as well as transplantation for cirrhosis and other chronic liver conditions. But no lab in the world has been successful in identifying and growing liver stem cells in culture — using any available technique — until now.
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Sequester: Medical researchers should panic, medical providers shouldn't
The Washington Post
It is not hard to find sequester panic in Washington these days. Legislators are panicked. The president is panicked. So, how panicked should various health care sectors be right now? It all depends on their role in the health care industry.
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Personalized medicine experts call on pathology profession to create a new breed of pathologist
Dark Daily
Pathologists are being urged to seize the high ground as the unfolding revolutions in genomics and bioinformatics create unprecedented capabilities to more accurately diagnose patients and guide the selection of appropriate therapies. Two experts in these fields have come together to issue a call to action for the pathology profession, stating that pathologists need to be prepared for the sequencing revolution.
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Blood culture medium affects bacterial detection, recovery
Medscape Medical News
The choice of which blood culture medium to use in detecting possible sepsis in trauma and emergency patients can make a difference in time to bacterial detection and recovery, according to an article published in the Clinical Infectious Diseases. Rebecca Zadroga, MD, from the Department of Infectious Disease, University of Minnesota, and Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, and colleagues conducted a head-to-head comparison of two widely used blood culture media at a 462-bed acute care trauma center and emergency department.
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New strain of tick bacteria spreading more disease
Scripps Howard News Service via Muscatine Journal
The tiny Western Black-Legged tick, already blamed for making people sick, is spreading new and little-known bacteria similar to the germ that causes Lyme disease, causing concern among health officials. The new strain has been found in ticks in 19 of California's counties, according to the state Department of Public Health.
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Gonorrhea cases soar in England as superbugs take hold
Reuters via Medscape Medical News
Gonorrhea cases have soared by 25 percent in the past year in England as drug-resistant strains of the sexually transmitted infection take hold worldwide, British health officials said recently. Nearly 21,000 new cases had been diagnosed in 2011, with more than a third of cases in gay men and more than a third in people who have had gonorrhea before, the U.K. Health Protection Agency said in a statement.
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Sunlight-powered prototype sterilizes medical equipment
MIT via Laboratory Equipment
Using sunlight, researchers and students at MIT are trying to change how medical equipment is sterilized in remote clinics — and a pilot project in Nicaragua has begun to show promising results. In that nation, a mostly rural population of 6 million is served by some 11 hospitals, dozens of health centers, and some 1,300 "health posts" that provide emergency care, obstetric services and the occasional baby delivery.

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In US, flu vaccine worked in just over half of those who got it
Reuters
A U.S. government analysis of this season's flu vaccine suggests it was effective in only 56 percent of people who got the shot, and it largely failed to protect the elderly against an especially deadly strain circulating during flu season. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the findings underscore the need for more effective weapons in the fight against influenza.

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Molecule helps nanoparticles sneak past immune system
MIT Technology Review
Taking a cue from nature, researchers have designed nanoparticles that can avoid being destroyed by the immune system by convincing immune cells that the particles are part of the body. The advance represents a fundamentally new way to address a major obstacle facing nanoparticle-based drug delivery.

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Bone marrow niches nurture blood stem cells
Washington University in St. Louis via Bioscience Technology
In research that could one day improve the success of stem cell transplants and chemotherapy, scientists have found that distinct niches exist in bone marrow to nurture different types of blood stem cells. Stem cells in the blood are the precursors to infection-fighting white blood cells and oxygen-carrying red blood cells.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    In US, flu vaccine worked in just over half of those who got it (Reuters)
Dallas doctor helps regrow man's broken leg (WFAA-TV)
Anti-HIV drug effort in South Africa yields dramatic results (Los Angeles Times)
Doctor's illness gives new focus to her cause (The New York Times)
Molecule helps nanoparticles sneak past immune system (MIT Technology Review)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Computer-based HIV drug-adherence program cuts costs
FierceHealthIT
Developing a computer-based intervention to improve medication adherence among HIV patients becomes more cost-effective the longer patients stay on track and as the number of users grows, according to a paper published in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making. Researchers sought to determine whether the initial high costs of development of such an intervention are offset by its benefits over time.
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