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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   March 18, 2014


New Forensic Application Notebook Available


Download the latest applications for Forensic Toxicology today in one handy notebook.

 



US gene mapping study shows promise, challenges
The Associated Press via Bioscience Technology
These days, it's faster and cheaper than ever to decipher a person's entire DNA. A small U.S. study suggests that looking for disease risks that way may not be ready for the masses. For one thing, the research found that gene variants most likely linked with significant disease were the least likely to be accurately identified. And analyzing the mass of data from the DNA scan is a daunting task, researchers said.
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CLMA's KnowledgeLab 2014: Connect. Grow. Lead.
CLMA
The Clinical Laboratory Management Association's premier educational event, KnowledgeLab 2014, May 4-7 in Las Vegas, provides a forum for laboratory leaders from all over the world to connect with their peers, grow their knowledge and lead the charge to address key challenges in the laboratory.

Register on or before March 28 to save up to $150!

Access the best in laboratory management training and information.

  • Daily general sessions featuring Michael Astion, M.D., Ph.D., Seattle Children's Hospital and Robert Michel, The Dark Report
  • Education covering essential topics
  • Pre-conference workshop presented by the Joint Commission on Tracer Methodology
  • The CLMA Leadership Curriculum — a deep dive into leadership skill development for those who are new to the management role and for current leaders who wish to enhance their proficiency

  • Register for KnowledgeLab 2014 today and find new ideas and new approaches to implement in your own laboratory.

    Hear why you should attend KnowledgeLab 2014. Hear why Ellen Dijkman Dulkes, KnowledgeLab 2014 Program Committee Chair, thinks you should attend KnowledgeLab this May!

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    Medical Laboratory Professionals Week — April 20-26
    American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
    It is time to celebrate and educate others about what YOU do! Start planning your celebration now. Purchase official logo items and more. For more information go to www.ascls.org/MLPW.
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    SPONSORED CONTENT


    Cell regeneration may ease Alzheimer's symptoms
    Tel Aviv University via Laboratory Equipment
    While memory loss is a common symptom of Alzheimer's disease, other behavioral manifestations — depression, loss of inhibition, delusions, agitation, anxiety and aggression — can be even more challenging for victims and their families to live with. Now professor Daniel Offen and Adi Shruster of Tel Aviv University's Sackler School of Medicine have discovered that by reestablishing a population of new cells in the part of the brain associated with behavior, some symptoms of Alzheimer's disease significantly decreased or were reversed altogether.
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    CDC: Rare female-to-female HIV transmission
    CNN
    A Texas woman apparently contracted HIV through sexual contact with another woman, the Centers for Disease Control reported, a rare female-to-female transmission of the virus. Testing confirmed the 46-year-old woman with newly diagnosed HIV "had a virus virtually identical to that of her female partner, who was diagnosed previously with HIV and who had stopped receiving antiretroviral treatment in 2010," according to the CDC's Weekly Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
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    Bioprinting of body parts inching closer to reality
    By Donna Balancia
    New 3-D printing technology is giving hope to medical patients who need to replace and repair body parts and organs. Creating organs through the use of a patient's own cells in many cases, this 3-D printing technology — known as "bioprinting" — is a promising new industry in the scientific community. The 3-D printing industry has been around for almost 20 years, but is coming to light now as many scientific companies compete for lucrative grants and awards to be among the first to replicate a human organ, such as a liver, scientists say.
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    Colon cancer rates drop sharply due to screenings
    USA Today
    Colon cancer rates have fallen by 30 percent over the past decade in people over age 50, and colonoscopies are getting much of the credit, according to a report released recently. The number of Americans ages 50 to 64 who have had a colonoscopy has nearly tripled, growing from 19 percent in 2000 to 55 percent in 2010.
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    Mammography's limits, seldom understood
    The New York Times
    None of the eight major clinical trials looking at whether regular mammograms reduce a woman's risk of dying from breast cancer has included women over age 75. Older adults are frequently excluded from trials, a problem for those trying to treat them based on information, not hunches.
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    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword MAMMOGRAPHY


    Circulating tumor DNA early indicator of cancer
    Medscape Medical News
    A blood test that identifies cancer and helps track progression is showing promise as an early warning sign, say researchers. The so-called liquid biopsy works by detecting circulating tumor DNA.
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    Measles outbreak sparks fear of resurgent diseases
    PBS
    VideoBrief Recent outbreaks of measles on both the east and west coasts highlight a larger story about how infectious diseases that had all but disappeared in the U.S. are now reappearing. Why are some of these diseases showing back up? Stephen Morse, a professor of epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, discusses the reasons for these outbreaks.
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    Therapy targets HIV hidden in cells
    News & Observer
    Conventional medicines can attack HIV, but remnants often remain hidden in patients' cells, ready to re-emerge and further drive the progression of AIDS. In a paper published in PLOS Pathogens, J. Victor Garcia-Martinez and colleagues from the UNC School of Medicine demonstrate a new and effective way to attack the hidden HIV.
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    US gene mapping study shows promise, challenges
    The Associated Press via Bioscience Technology
    These days, it's faster and cheaper than ever to decipher a person's entire DNA. A small U.S. study suggests that looking for disease risks that way may not be ready for the masses. For one thing, the research found that gene variants most likely linked with significant disease were the least likely to be accurately identified.

    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    read more
    30,000-year-old giant virus 'comes back to life'
    BBC News
    An ancient virus has "come back to life" after lying dormant for at least 30,000 years, scientists say. It was found frozen in a deep layer of the Siberian permafrost, but after it thawed it became infectious once again.

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    Mysterious polio-like illness affects kids in California
    USA Today
    A mysterious polio-like syndrome has affected as many as 25 California children, leaving them with paralyzed limbs and little hope of recovery. California is working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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    5-second rule on dropped food may have some truth to it
    St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    A team of biology students at Aston University in Birmingham conducted experiments on common foods dropped on common floor surfaces. The floors had been coated with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The researchers monitored how much of the bacteria were transferred from the floors to the food items in periods ranging from three to 30 seconds.
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    Expert: Genetic code unlocking future of medicine
    Medscape Medical News
    Craig Venter, Ph.D., has a different vision for medicine, which he calls downloadable biology; it involves collecting genomic data in every patient's workup. And Dr. Venter hasn't been shy about putting his own and his investor's money on the line to prove he's right.
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    Fluorescence microscopy aids in melanoma development discovery
    BioOptics World
    Using fluorescence microscopy, an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University Hospital and the LIMES Institute of the University of Bonn in Germany has discovered that sunburns contribute to the development of malignant melanoma — not only through direct alteration of pigment cell genomes, but also indirectly through inflammatory processes in the surrounding tissue.
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