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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   Mar. 19, 2013

 



Rapid HIV treatment points to 'functional cure' for AIDS
Reuters
Treating people with HIV rapidly after they have become infected with the virus that causes AIDS may be enough to achieve a "functional cure" in a small proportion of patients diagnosed early, according to new research. Scientists in France who followed 14 patients who were treated very swiftly with HIV drugs but then stopped treatment found that even when they had been off therapy for more than seven years, they still showed no signs of the virus rebounding.
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Ovarian cancer may arise from stem-like cells
Medical News Today
Scientists have discovered that the ovary contains a group of cells similar to stem cells that can mutate to form tumors. In a study of mouse ovaries, they found they could coax the stem-like cells to become cancerous by switching off two tumor-suppressing genes. The study is likely to make a significant contribution to what we know about ovarian cancer.
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Researchers pair experiments with computer models to peer into cells
University of Warwick via PhysOrg
BBSRC-funded researchers have developed a new strategy that can give scientists a better insight into how complex molecular machineries function in living cells. In research published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology, the team from the University of Warwick, Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocenter and Liverpool University, showed how to extract in vivo information about how complex molecular systems in yeast cells are controlled.
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Blood test tracks response to cancer treatment
Medical News Today
A blood test that tracks fragments of DNA shed by dying tumor cells could one day be used to monitor how well patients are responding to cancer treatment, according to a small study in women with advanced breast cancer. Such a test could provide a non-invasive alternative to biopsies and help adapt treatment to individual patients and the progress of disease.
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CDC: Patient killed by rabies from organ transplant
NBC News
Rabies killed a patient who got a kidney transplant more than a year ago, federal officials said. Now they are treating three other people who got a second kidney, a heart and a liver from the same donor — an Air Force recruit who apparently died of undiagonosed rabies.
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Drug-resistant TB spreads as $1.6 billion budget shortfall looms
Bloomberg
The global fight against drug- resistant tuberculosis is facing an annual $1.6 billion budget shortfall, threatening progress made against the second-deadliest infectious disease. The missing funds may enable treatment for 17 million people and save 6 million lives from 2014 to 2016, the World Health Organization and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria said in a joint statement.
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Signaling molecule may help stem cells focus on making bone despite age, disease
Medical College of Georgia via Medical Xpress
A signaling molecule that helps stem cells survive in the naturally low-oxygen environment inside the bone marrow may hold clues to helping the cells survive when the going gets worse with age and disease, researchers report. They hope the findings, reported in PLOS ONE, will result in better therapies to prevent bone loss in aging and enhance success of stem cell transplants for a wide variety of conditions from heart disease to cerebral palsy and cancer.
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UK health official: Antibiotic resistance poses 'catastrophic threat' to medicine
Reuters via Huffington Post
Antibiotic resistance poses a catastrophic threat to medicine and could mean patients having minor surgery risk dying from infections that can no longer be treated, Britain's top health official said. Sally Davies, the chief medical officer for England, said global action is needed to fight antibiotic, or antimicrobial, resistance and fill a drug "discovery void" by researching and developing new medicines to treat emerging, mutating infections.
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HPV, other vaccinations lagging in teens
Medscape Medical News
Many teens are still not getting the recommended vaccines, and fewer parents plan to give their adolescent daughters the human papillomavirus vaccine because of concerns about its safety, despite increased clinician recommendations, according to an analysis of data from the 2008–2010 National Immunization Survey of Teens.
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Cell fusion studies at Johns Hopkins could lead to improved treatments
for muscular dystrophy

The Medical News
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have established a high-efficiency cell-cell fusion system, providing a new model to study how fusion works. The discovery, researchers say, could lead to improved treatments for muscular dystrophy, since muscle regeneration relies on cell fusion to make muscle fibers that contain hundreds or even thousands of nuclei.
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HPV, other vaccinations lagging in teens
Medscape Medical News
Many teens are still not getting the recommended vaccines, and fewer parents plan to give their adolescent daughters the human papillomavirus vaccine because of concerns about its safety, despite increased clinician recommendations, according to an analysis of data from the 2008–2010 National Immunization Survey of Teens.

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Former employee: Compounding pharmacy 'got greedy'
WCVB-TV
Former employees of a Framingham compounding pharmacy at the center of a national meningitis outbreak are claiming the New England Compounding Center brazenly broke the rules. For the first time in the six months since the fungal meningitis outbreak, those who worked inside the compounding pharmacy are speaking out.

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Study provides new clues to how flu virus spreads
Infection Control Today
People may more likely be exposed to the flu through airborne virus than previously thought, according to new research from the University of Maryland School of Public Health. The study also found that when flu patients wear a surgical mask, the release of virus in even the smallest airborne droplets can be significantly reduced.

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How data stopped SARS
CNN
VideoBrief A decade ago, the World Health Organization first named SARS — the deadly virus that would infect 29 countries before it was finally contained four months later. And, looking back, what was the most indispensable tool that ended the outbreak? According to Dr. Isabelle Nuttall, WHO Director of Global Capacities Alert and Response, it was data.
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Roller derby an arena for swapping bacteria
CBS News
Roller derby players share more than sweat and grime as they jostle for rank in the rink. A new study published in PeerJ in shows that roller derby teams have distinct bacteria and may swap strains during gameplay.
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Even moderate drinking may be risky with hepatitis C
Reuters via Fox News
For people with the chronic liver infection hepatitis C, heavy drinking is an obvious no-no, but a new study links even modest alcohol consumption with an increased risk of death — and not just from liver disease. The findings support what liver specialists typically recommend — that people with hepatitis C should limit their alcohol use, said Dr. Zobair Younossi, the study's lead author and chair of medicine at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Falls Church, Va.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Former employee: Compounding pharmacy 'got greedy' (WCVB-TV)
Why 'nightmare bacteria' is on the rise (CNN)
Breast cancer technique to be tested on human breast tissue for 1st time (Science and Technology Facilities Council via Medical Xpress)
4 awesome infection-prevention videos (FierceHealthCare)
Study: Bee venom kills HIV (U.S. News & World Report)

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New handheld HIV testing device faster, cheaper than ELISA tests performed
in clinical pathology laboratories

Dark Daily
Picture a point-of-care device that produces highly accurate HIV results at a lower cost and 10 times faster than traditional ELISA testing currently done by clinical laboratories — then automatically, instantaneously transmits and synchronizes the results with cloud-based electronic healthcare records. This device is a reality and was developed by researchers at Columbia University in New York City.
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