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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   March 25, 2014


New Forensic Application Notebook Available


Download the latest applications for Forensic Toxicology today in one handy notebook.

 



Silicone chip recreates cancer's microenvironment
Chemical & Engineering News
Killing cancer cells growing on a petri dish is an entirely different beast than fighting cancer cells in the human body. To provide a more realistic platform for screening anticancer drugs, bioengineers have created a device that better replicates the environment around human tumors than conventional cell culture does.
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CLMA's KnowledgeLab 2014: Connect. Grow. Lead.
CLMA
The Clinical Laboratory Management Association's premier educational event, KnowledgeLab 2014, May 4-7 in Las Vegas, provides a forum for laboratory leaders from all over the world to connect with their peers, grow their knowledge and lead the charge to address key challenges in the laboratory.

Register on or before March 28 to save up to $150!

Access the best in laboratory management training and information.

  • Daily general sessions featuring Michael Astion, M.D., Ph.D., Seattle Children's Hospital and Robert Michel, The Dark Report
  • Education covering essential topics
  • Pre-conference workshop presented by the Joint Commission on Tracer Methodology
  • The CLMA Leadership Curriculum — a deep dive into leadership skill development for those who are new to the management role and for current leaders who wish to enhance their proficiency

  • Register for KnowledgeLab 2014 today and find new ideas and new approaches to implement in your own laboratory.

    Hear why you should attend KnowledgeLab 2014. Hear why Ellen Dijkman Dulkes, KnowledgeLab 2014 Program Committee Chair, thinks you should attend KnowledgeLab this May!

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    Medical Laboratory Professionals Week — April 20-26
    American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
    It is time to celebrate and educate others about what YOU do! Start planning your celebration now. Purchase official logo items and more. For more information go to www.ascls.org/MLPW.
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    SPONSORED CONTENT


    CDC: Tuberculosis in US hits record low
    HealthDay News
    Rates of tuberculosis in the United States are falling, with cases at a historic low, health officials reported. Improved screening of immigrants has helped reduce incidence of the highly contagious lung disease, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.
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    MIT researchers develop living material using E. coli
    Nature World News
    Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a material with the properties of both living and non living things using E. coli bacteria. Their study paves the way for futuristic self-assembling materials that could be used in solar cells and biosensors.
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    Industry emerging to bolsters genomic analyses of healthcare, laboratory data
    Dark Daily
    A new industry is emerging dedicated to accepting, storing and analyzing vast quantities of data generated by next-generation gene sequencing and whole human-genome sequencing. There are already examples of academic departments of pathology and laboratory medicine that have outsourced the storage and annotation of whole human genomes sequenced from tissue specimens collected from cancer patients. The annotated genomes are returned to the referring pathologists for analysis.
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    Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword GENE SEQUENCING


    For women's cancers, where you're treated matters
    HealthDay News
    Where you're treated for ovarian or other gynecologic cancers makes a difference. Women with these conditions live more than a year longer on average if they're treated at hospitals that deal with a large number of these cancers, according to a new study.
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    Confidentiality essential for genetic testing in hepatitis C
    Medscape Medical News
    Urban drug users have a general sense of the importance of genetic testing as part of hepatitis C care, but have concerns about confidentiality and possible discrimination as a result of such testing, a new study has shown. Genetic testing is important because it identifies people who will respond to treatment with interleukin. However, it is not clear how best to integrate genetic testing into the care of marginalized populations, such as drug users.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        5-second rule on dropped food may have some truth to it (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
    Measles outbreak sparks fear of resurgent diseases (PBS)
    Colon cancer rates drop sharply due to screenings (USA Today)
    CDC: Rare female-to-female HIV transmission (CNN)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    Novel HF therapy by micro-RNA blockade: Proof of concept
    Heartwire via Medscape Medical News
    A future generation of therapies for heart failure could depend on disruption of micro-RNA–mediated genetic machinery that affects cardiac myocyte structure and contractility. In a study primarily in mice but also in tissue from human failing hearts, injection of a tiny nucleotide that blocks a micro-RNA regulator of cellular calcium transport appeared to stem the progression of induced heart failure in the animal model.
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    Exercise cuts breast cancer risk for all women everywhere
    NPR
    Exercise reduces women's risk of breast cancer, no matter what kind of exercise they do, how old they are, how much they weigh, or when they get started. Researchers in France found that the more active a woman is, the better her odds of avoiding breast cancer. Women who were most active, with more than an hour a day of vigorous activity, got the most benefits, lowering their cancer risk by 12 percent.
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    FEATURED ARTICLE
    MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
    TRENDING ARTICLE
    Silicone chip recreates cancer's microenvironment
    Chemical & Engineering News
    Killing cancer cells growing on a petri dish is an entirely different beast than fighting cancer cells in the human body. To provide a more realistic platform for screening anticancer drugs, bioengineers have created a device that better replicates the environment around human tumors than conventional cell culture does.

    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    read more
    5-second rule on dropped food may bear some truth
    St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    A team of biology students conducted experiments on common foods dropped on common floor surfaces coated with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Researchers monitored how much of the bacteria were transferred from the floors to the food items in periods ranging from three to 30 seconds.

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    Starving melanoma cells may slow tumor growth
    Medical News Today
    New research suggests melanoma skin cancer may be controllable by starving its cells. Building on previous success with prostate cancer cells, scientists in Australia showed they could stop cell growth by blocking the pumps that melanoma cells use to acquire an essential cell nutrient.

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    Failure of clinics to offer HPV vaccine leaves high-risk groups vulnerable
    Fierce Vaccines
    Concerns about cost and promiscuity have led to many countries struggling to increase uptake of GlaxoSmithKline's and Merck's human papillomavirus vaccines. England fits into this category, but survey data suggests it has a more fundamental problem: High-risk groups are less likely to be offered the vaccine.
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    Research consortium focuses on better drug therapies for viral infections
    University of Alabama at Birmingham via The Medical News
    Viral infections with limited or no treatment options can pose a major global health threat, but a new national research consortium centered at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is focused on the discovery of new and better drug therapies as these viruses emerge. The center will focus on developing drugs against four RNA virus families: influenza, flaviviruses, coronaviruses and alphaviruses — infections causing diseases including West Nile, SARS, MERS, chikungunya and dengue.
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    Fat mass in cells expands with disuse
    Laboratory Equipment
    To understand how obesity develops, researchers in Tel Aviv University's Department of Biomedical Engineering used state-of-the-art technology to analyze the accumulation of fat in the body at the cellular level. According to their findings, nutrition is not the only factor driving obesity. The mechanics of "cellular expansion" plays a primary role in fat production, they discovered.
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