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New research shows promise in blood cancer treatment
By Rosemary Sparacio
Blood cancers pose many challenges for healthcare professionals engaged in clinical research, patient care and treatment. Several new approaches published recently show promise for the future in this field of medicine. One approach for treating leukemia, discovered by a team in Montreal, disarms a gene that is responsible for tumor progression. By targeting the gene, known as Brg1, in leukemia stem cells, researchers think this may offer new therapeutic opportunities by preventing the disease from coming back. Several new drugs are also on the horizon.
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April 17 webinar — Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Case Studies: Effective Resistance Detection and Reporting
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
Renowned expert Janet Hindler will present case studies to highlight the most clinically significant types of resistance encountered today, methods for accurate detection and options for results reporting. For more information and to register, go to www.ascls.org/webinars. ASCLS members register at a discount with code wsdc14.
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Medical Laboratory Professionals Week — April 20-26
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
It is time to celebrate and educate others about what YOU do! Start planning your celebration now. Purchase official logo items, download the logo, and more at www.ascls.org/MLPW.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Periodic puns: Chemistry jokes just in time for April Fools' Day
American Chemical Society
It's April Fools' Day, and the American Chemical Society's Reactions video series is celebrating with an episode featuring our favorite chemistry jokes. Which two elements look cute together? Why is father water concerned about his "iced out" son? What do you get when you combine sulfur, tungsten and silver? Get all the punchlines in the latest Reactions episode, available at http://youtu.be/C5RZRkhk0OM.
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WHO: Liberian health authorities confirm two cases of Ebola
Reuters
The World Health Organisation said that Liberia has confirmed two cases of the deadly Ebola virus that is suspected to have killed at least 70 people in Guinea. The outbreak of the highly contagious Ebola, which in its more acute phase, causes vomiting, diarrhea and external bleeding, has sent Guinea's West African neighbors scrambling to contain the spread of the disease.
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New strategy aims to reduce transplant rejection
By Sharee Ann Narciso
UC San Francisco researchers have recently developed a two-pronged approach to the problem of organ transplantation rejections seen in recipients. The strategy aims to weaken specific immune responses that affect transplanted tissue. The results in controlled mouse experiments have shown promise so far: 70 percent of the mice did not reject the transplants without using any long-term immunosuppressive treatment. The goal of the strategy is to spare patients from having to undergo lifelong immunosuppression and to help treat Type 1 diabetes and similar autoimmune diseases.
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Researchers identify protein that helps control common viral infection
Johns Hopkins Children's Center via Infection Control Today
Infectious disease specialists at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center have identified a protein that regulates the body’s immune response to cytomegalovirus, a common pathogen that causes lifelong infections and can lead to devastating illness in newborns and those with weakened immune systems. The protein — a cell receptor called NOD2 found in several types of immune cells — has long been known for its role in fighting off bacterial invaders by sensing their presence and alerting immune cells to release chemicals that weaken or destroy the harmful bacteria.
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Breast cancer differences spur drug hope
BBC News
VideoBrief A study of genetic errors in types of mouse breast cells led by Cardiff University is bringing the prospect of personalized treatments for breast cancer closer, researchers say. The study was able to replicate almost the entire spectrum of aggressive breast cancer coming from one cell type.
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Researchers find good bacteria that protect women from HIV infection
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston via The Medical News
Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston by growing vaginal skin cells outside the body and studying the way they interact with "good and bad" bacteria, think they may be able to better identify the good bacteria that protect women from HIV infection and other sexually transmitted infections.
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Confidentiality essential for genetic testing in hepatitis C
Medscape Medical News
Urban drug users have a general sense of the importance of genetic testing as part of hepatitis C care, but have concerns about confidentiality and possible discrimination as a result of such testing, a new study has shown. Genetic testing is important because it identifies people who will respond to treatment with interleukin (IL)28B. However, it is not clear how best to integrate genetic testing into the care of marginalized populations, such as drug users.
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As health system complexities rise, a new industry emerges
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
If you want to learn about the complexities of the modern healthcare delivery system, there's no better person to ask than a physician. Their familiarity with the bureaucracy and tough patient choices associated with medical care is driving many out of clinical practice. And now it's causing some to look into a developing industry that has emerged. As patients now face more choices and assume more financial responsibility for their care than ever before, the navigator concept is emerging as a mainstream industry that is spreading across almost every medical discipline.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    MIT researchers develop living material using E. coli (Nature World News)
Silicone chip recreates cancer's microenvironment (Chemical & Engineering News)
For women's cancers, where you're treated matters (HealthDay News)
Exercise cuts breast cancer risk for all women everywhere (NPR)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Study: EHR data may predict sepsis mortality
Medscape Medical News
Vital signs and laboratory data in electronic health records can be used to predict whether hospitalized patients will develop the high blood lactate levels that are often associated with sepsis, according to a study performed at the University of California, Davis. Using lactate levels along with arterial pressure and respiratory rate data, researchers were able to predict the mortality of patients with sepsis in the majority of cases.
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Stanford researchers develop low-cost paper microscope
The Stanford Daily
A team of Stanford University researchers has developed an ultra-low cost paper microscope that offers the potential for more effective disease diagnosis in developing regions. According to assistant professor of bioengineering Manu Prakash, the Foldscope was inspired by methods of mass production that Prakash witnessed while traveling in India and Thailand. Each Foldscope contains three stages — a specimen stage in which to place the slide, an optics stage that holds a ball lens and an illumination stage that contains an LED light.
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Pressure grows to improve research validity
The Boston Globe
It is a story that unfolds in biomedical research more often than anyone would like: A promising research result sparks excitement about treating or understanding a disease. Then, efforts to repeat the experiment in other laboratories fail. In the latest example that has been quietly brewing in scientific circles, a Cambridge, Mass.-based nonprofit reported in the journal Nature that more than 100 potential drugs for the lethal neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis failed to show benefit in carefully designed mouse studies.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
New research shows promise in blood cancer treatment
By Rosemary Sparacio
Blood cancers pose many challenges for healthcare professionals engaged in clinical research, patient care and treatment. Several new approaches published recently show promise for the future in this field of medicine.

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read more
MIT researchers develop living material using E. coli
Nature World News
Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a material with the properties of both living and non living things using E. coli bacteria. Their study paves the way for futuristic self-assembling materials that could be used in solar cells and biosensors.

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Study: Vinegar a key to killing drug-resistant TB
U.S. News & World Report
One of the world's oldest known disinfectants — and favorite salad dressings — may prove even stronger than previously thought. An international research team has found that vinegar — or, more specifically, the active ingredient in vinegar — can kill mycobacteria, including a highly drug-resistant form of tuberculosis.

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Infection prevention boosted by quality improvement strategies
Infection Control Today
Quality and quality improvement in healthcare has always been an assumed component of infection prevention, but it has taken on new meaning in an age of healthcare reform and the concurrent drive toward cost containment and improved patient outcomes. For a word that is bandied about so frequently, what is its true meaning and what does it portend for infection preventionists who are tasked with playing a key role in performance improvement in acute care?
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'Designer' chromosome for brewer's yeast built from scratch
The Guardian
Researchers have built a complex chromosome from scratch and shown that it works normally by transplanting it into a healthy organism. The international team used a computer to redesign one of the chromosomes found in brewer's yeast, recreating the thread-like structure piece by piece in the laboratory.
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