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New gene map of deadly bird flu points to pandemic concerns
National Geographic
A new study by virologist Ron Fouchier and researchers from Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands explores the ability of the H5N1 bird flu strain to become airborne transmissible between mammals. The researchers describe their work, published recently in the journal Cell, as providing key insights into how the bird flu virus might spread and, by extension, helping to prevent a possible pandemic.
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April 17 webinar: Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing case studies: Effective resistance detection and reporting
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
Renowned expert Janet Hindler will present case studies to highlight the most clinically significant types of resistance encountered today, methods for accurate detection and options for results reporting. For more information and to register, go to www.ascls.org/webinars. ASCLS members register at a discount with code wsdc14.
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Medical Laboratory Professionals Week — April 20-26
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
It is time to celebrate and educate others about what YOU do! Start planning your celebration now. Purchase official logo items, download the logo and more at www.ascls.org/MLPW.
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Electronic skin patch could treat diseases
Discovery News
Researchers have made an electronic skin patch that can monitor muscle movement, store the data it collects and use stored data patterns to decide when to deliver medicine through the skin. The patch could be useful for monitoring and treating Parkinson's disease and epilepsy, its creators say.
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Overweight/obese youth may not receive needed lab screening
Medscape Medical News
Maryland Medicaid/Children's Health Program providers are inadequately coding diagnoses of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents, according to a CDC study published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Furthermore, at-risk overweight and obese children and adolescents are not receiving recommended laboratory screening tests for obesity-related conditions.
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Creating body parts in a lab: 'Things are happening now'
CNN
Scientists in the United States, Mexico and Switzerland grew reproductive organs and nasal cartilage in labs and successfully implanted them in patients, according to two studies released in The Lancet. It is not the first time scientists have engineered body parts — in effect, creating organs where before there were none. What is different in these cases is the size and complexity of the organs.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword BODY PARTS


Programs across the nation boosting interest in STEM fields
By Archita Datta Majumdar
There seems to a dichotomy between the STEM crisis and STEM demand in recent years. Conflicting reports claim that there are more STEM graduates than jobs available, while others claim that a lack of STEM graduates is a major factor in a surge of foreign students and more H1-B visas. Which one is true and which one should we believe? Perhaps a bit of both, but the underlying fact between the two is that we need a solid and indigenous population of graduates in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
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This breast cancer scares patients, challenges doctors
The Indianapolis Star
When Tonya Trotter first felt a quarter-size knot in her breast, she didn't rush to get a mammogram. Over the next few months, the lump grew to the size of a tennis ball. But it was the sharp pain in her breast that finally persuaded her to go to the emergency room in August 2012. Two days later she learned she had a type of breast cancer called "triple negative."
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Rapid screenings detect previously unreported HCV infections
Medscape Medical News
The combination of being able to take needle-stick blood samples outside of the typical clinical setting and rapid screening tests has revealed previously unreported hepatitis C virus infections in Wisconsin. These are techniques that could be leveraged across the nation as the number of young drug users with HCV infections has spiked, according to a new study.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Key chocolate ingredients could help prevent obesity, diabetes (American Chemical Society via ScienceDaily)
Fighting cancer with lasers and nanoballoons that pop (HealthCanal)
Fatal virus in Ghana tests negative for Ebola (Reuters)
Can a transplant drug help eliminate lingering HIV infections? (Los Angeles Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Here's why scientists just published the recipe for superflu
Vox
A few years ago, a researcher took the deadly bird flu, turned it into a highly contagious deadly bird flu, and then tried to publish how he did it. The ensuing controversy delayed the publication of his paper for six months. Recently, his group is back with a perfected recipe: the minimum number of mutations needed to make bird flu spread between mammals easily.
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Uganda nurse accused of deliberately spreading HIV
Counsel & Heal
An HIV-infected nurse has been accused of injecting her blood into a two-year-old patient in Uganda. The case of Rosemary Namubiru is being viewed by media as a disturbing example of the poor hospital standards thought to be commonplace in the country, The State Column reported.
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Law changes how Medicare sets prices for clinical laboratory tests
Dark Daily
Clinical laboratories will face new financial challenges following passage of a new federal law recently that makes deep changes in the way Medicare officials will establish prices for the Medicare Part B Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule. Many medical laboratory administrators, hospital lab managers, and pathologists remain unaware of the significant negative financial impact this law will have on their lab’s revenue and fiscal stability.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
New gene map of deadly bird flu points to pandemic concerns
National Geographic
A new study explores the ability of the H5N1 bird flu strain to become airborne transmissible between mammals. The researchers describe their work, published recently in the journal Cell, as providing key insights into how the bird flu virus might spread and, by extension, helping to prevent a possible pandemic.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Key chocolate ingredients could help prevent obesity, diabetes
American Chemical Society via ScienceDaily
Scientists are now homing in on what ingredients in chocolate might help prevent obesity, as well as Type 2 diabetes. They found that one particular type of antioxidant in cocoa prevented laboratory mice from gaining excess weight and lowered their blood sugar levels.

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MIT researchers develop living material using E. coli
Nature World News
Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a material with the properties of both living and non living things using E. coli bacteria. Their study paves the way for futuristic self-assembling materials that could be used in solar cells and biosensors.

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Silly Putty ingredient could help stem cells become motor neurons
RedOrbit
An ingredient found in Silly Putty could help scientists more efficiently turn human embryonic stem cells into fully functional specialized cells, according to research published online Sunday in the journal Nature Materials. In the study, researchers from the University of Michigan report how they were able to coax stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells by growing them on a soft, extremely fine carpet in which the threads were created from polydimethylsiloxane, one component of the popular children's toy.
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Hepatitis C treatment cures more than 90 percent of patients with cirrhosis
UT Medicine San Antonio, Texas Liver Institute via Infection Control Today
Twelve weeks of an investigational oral therapy cured hepatitis C infection in more than 90 percent of patients with liver cirrhosis and was well tolerated by these patients, according to an international study that included researchers from UT Medicine San Antonio and the Texas Liver Institute. Historically, hepatitis C cure rates in patients with cirrhosis (liver scarring) have been lower than 50 percent and the treatment was not safe for many of these patients.
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