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Sidestepping the biopsy with new tools to spot cancer
The New York Times
For people with cancer or suspected cancer, the biopsy is a necessary evil — an uncomfortable and somewhat risky procedure to extract tissue for diagnosis or analysis. Telltale traces of a tumor are often present in the blood. These traces — either intact cancer cells or fragments of tumor DNA — are present in minuscule amounts, but numerous companies are now coming to market with sophisticated tests that can detect and analyze them.
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Committee seeking input on impact on quality of care
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
On behalf of the Patient Safety and Promotion of the Profession Collaboration Subcommittee within ASCLS, Ryan Kennedy is requesting your help. For the year 2015 this subcommittee is collaborating to develop a product to help raise awareness and celebrate about how much we in the laboratory impact the quality of care given to patients.

As we know, we help save many lives on a daily basis but are very commonly the unsung heroes/heroines. We are collecting stories to create a calendar for the year 2015 to bring honor and increase awareness to our profession as a whole. If you would be willing to share any personal experiences within your laboratory where you work or teach in which a patient's life was drastically changed for the better because of the diligent work and understanding of laboratory science, please email these events to me at rynken89@yahoo.com.

Also, these calendars will contain important, relevant and historic medical dates (including but not limited to the laboratory) and will be available in both hard and electronic copies in the ASCLS store website. I hope to hear from you. Thank you.

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Chikungunya, a highly infectious disease, may soon arrive in the US
Al Jazeera America
Chikungunya, a virus originally from Central Africa, transmitted by mosquito bites, has rampaged through Yogyakarta — part of an outbreak that has stretched across the Indian Ocean, India and Southeast Asia since 2005. Now it is roaring through the Western Hemisphere.
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New CDC/FDA warning against unapproved Lyme culture test
Medscape Medical News
Concerns about the purported Borrelia burgdorferi culture test marketed by Advanced Laboratory Services resulted recently in a blunt warning published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, advising use only of the 83 FDA-approved tests for diagnosis of Lyme disease.
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FDA discourages procedure in uterine surgery
The New York Times
Doctors should stop using a procedure performed on tens of thousands of American women a year in the course of uterine surgery because it poses a risk of spreading cancerous tissue, the Food and Drug Administration said recently. The procedure, power morcellation, involves using a device to cut tissue into pieces that can be pulled out through the tiny incisions made during minimally invasive surgery. The devices, known as morcellators, have been widely used in laparoscopic operations to remove fibroid tumors from the uterus, or to remove the entire uterus.
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SHOWCASE
 
GW Online Programs In MLS

Fully Online Medical Laboratory Sciences Undergraduate and Graduate Degree and Certificate Programs
Earn ASCP MLS Certification through our BSHS or Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in MLS
New MSHS programs for 2014: MLS, Translational Microbiology, Molecular Diagnostic Sciences
Visit http://smhs.gwu.edu/crl/programs/mls for more information or contact the MLS program at mls@gwu.edu or 202-994-7732.
 


A protein required for integrity of induced pluripotent stem cells
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas via Science Codex
Cell reprogramming converts specialized cells such as nerve cells or skin cells toward an embryonic stem cell state. This reversal in the evolutionary development of cells also requires a reversal in the biology of telomeres, the structures that protect the ends of chromosomes; whilst under normal conditions telomeres shorten over time, during cell reprogramming they follow the opposite strategy and increase in length.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword HPV


Research sheds new light on the development of HPV-associated cancer
Ohio Supercomputer Center via The Medical News
Researchers at The Ohio State University have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development — by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when the virus is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates. The study, recently published in the journal Genome Research and reviewed in The Scientist, leveraged the massive computational power of the Ohio Supercomputer Center systems.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    This breast cancer scares patients, challenges doctors (The Indianapolis Star)
New gene map of deadly bird flu points to pandemic concerns (National Geographic)
Uganda nurse accused of deliberately spreading HIV (Counsel & Heal)
Creating body parts in a lab: 'Things are happening now' (CNN)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Antimicrobial metallopolymers and bioconjugates with conventional antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a complex of multidrug-resistant gram-positive bacterial strains, has proven especially problematic in both hospital and community settings by deactivating conventional β-lactam antibiotics, including penicillins, cephalosporins and carbapenems, through various mechanisms, resulting in increased mortality rates and hospitalization costs. Researchers introduced a class of charged metallopolymers that exhibit synergistic effects against MRSA by efficiently inhibiting activity of β-lactamase and effectively lysing bacterial cells.
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Researchers isolate immune cells to study disease prevention
HealthCanal
Case Western Reserve University dental researchers have found a less invasive way to extract single rare immune cells from the mouth to study how the mouth's natural defenses ward off infection and inflammation. By isolating some specialized immune cells to study how they fight diseases in the mouth — or reject foreign tissues, such as in failed organ transplants — researchers hope to learn more about treating and preventing such health issues as oral cancers, cardiovascular disease, AIDS and other infectious diseases.
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  FEATURED COMPANIES
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AMT is designed for and led by lab professionals like you! Enhance your professional growth by joining our team (ASCP certficants don’t need further testing).

www.americanmedtech.org
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To find out how to feature your company in the ASCLS eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469-420-2629.
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Swiss Medical Board: Stop widespread mammography screening
Medscape Medical News
The Swiss Medical Board has recommended that Switzerland stop introducing new mammography screening programs and phase out existing programs, according to an essay published online in the New England Journal of Medicine. The group recommends that systematic screening programs be replaced with systematic screening information and that women make individual choices.
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CDC: Food-borne illness rates steady
MedPage Today
There's good news and bad news about food safety, the CDC is reporting. On the positive side, there were fewer cases of food-borne illness caused by Salmonella in 2013, the agency said in a recent issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. On the other hand, cases of disease caused by some other agents — notably Vibrio species — are up, and overall the number of cases caused by a suite of nine important pathogens has remained steady.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
Sidestepping the biopsy with new tools to spot cancer
The New York Times
For people with cancer or suspected cancer, the biopsy is a necessary evil. Telltale traces of a tumor are often present in the blood. These traces are present in minuscule amounts, but numerous companies are now coming to market with sophisticated tests that can detect and analyze them.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
This breast cancer scares patients, challenges doctors
The Indianapolis Star
When Tonya Trotter first felt a quarter-size knot in her breast, she didn't rush to get a mammogram. Over the next few months, the lump grew to the size of a tennis ball. Later she learned she had a type of breast cancer called "triple negative."

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Key chocolate ingredients could help prevent obesity, diabetes
American Chemical Society via ScienceDaily
Scientists are now homing in on what ingredients in chocolate might help prevent obesity, as well as Type 2 diabetes. They found that one particular type of antioxidant in cocoa prevented laboratory mice from gaining excess weight and lowered their blood sugar levels.

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New MRSA superbug emerges in Brazil
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston via Infection Control Today
An international research team at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The report appeared in The New England Journal of Medicine.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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