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ASCLS eNewsBytes
May 5, 2009
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At CDC, War Against Flu Doesn't Stop
from CNN
Researchers in two U.S. laboratories are preparing for the arrival of blood samples from Mexican flu victims to make a serum that might offer some protection from a dangerous new flu virus. "It's emergency science," Patrick Wilson, of the University of Chicago, said. Wilson and colleague Rafi Ahmed, a vaccine expert at Emory University in Atlanta, hope to develop a new way to quickly make targeted, infection-fighting proteins called monoclonal antibodies. More    E-mail article

Beckman Coulter

Trial by Fire: New Antibody Method Gets Big Test
from Reuters
Researchers from Durham University's Centre for Bioactive Chemistry are developing methods that show how proteins interact with cell membranes when a virus strikes. Using their approach, the team hopes to find new ways to disrupt and disarm "enveloped viruses" before they spread in our bodies. More    E-mail article

Matrix Protein Key to Fighting Viruses
from Science Daily
Researchers from Durham University's Centre for Bioactive Chemistry are developing methods that show how proteins interact with cell membranes when a virus strikes. Using their approach, the team hopes to find new ways to disrupt and disarm "enveloped viruses" before they spread in our bodies. More    E-mail article

Chronic Kidney Disease Linked to Higher Risk of Cancer
from Healthday News via The American Journal of Hematology/Oncology
Moderate chronic kidney disease may raise older men's risk of cancer by nearly 40 percent, according to research published online in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Germaine Wong, of Westmead Hospital in Sydney, Australia, and colleagues analyzed data from 3,654 middle-aged and elderly participants in a population-based cohort study. During a mean follow-up of 10.1 years, subjects developed 711 cancers. More    E-mail article

New DNA Coding to Track Mosquitoes, Fight Disease
from Reuters
A novel genetic technology will be used in Africa to track mosquitoes that can spread a disease disfiguring millions of people with often grotesque swellings, scientists said. "DNA barcoding" − a technique that quickly obtains a unique genetic code − would be used to help identify mosquitoes that spread Elephantiasis, a disease formally known as lymphatic filariasis. More    E-mail article

Equitech

Different Panels of Markers Should Be Used to Predict Mammary Paget's Disease Associated with in Situ or Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast
from Annals of Clinical & Laboratory Science
Mammary Paget's disease (MPD) is a rare manifestation of breast carcinoma involving the nipple. The study's objective was to identify molecular markers and molecular subtypes that may predict patients at high risk of developing MPD. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed with antibodies to estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, androgen receptor, HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor, and several cytokeratins. More    E-mail article

Oldest Dinosaur Protein Found − Blood Vessels, More
from National Geographic News
The fossilized leg of an 80-million-year-old duck-billed dinosaur has yielded the oldest known proteins preserved in soft tissue—including blood vessels and other connective tissue as well as perhaps blood cell proteins—a new study says. More    E-mail article

New Technology Promising Against Resistant Staph Infections
from Infection Control Today
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of YeshivaUniversity have combined their revolutionary new drug-delivery system with a powerful antimicrobial agent to treat potentially deadly drug-resistant staph infections in a mouse model. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria cause the majority of superficial and invasive skin infections, resulting in more than 11 million outpatient/emergency room visits and 464,000 hospital admissions annually in the U.S. Staph are also notorious for infecting patients while they're in the hospital for other reasons. More    E-mail article

Nanoparticle Delivery System Developed to Induce Immunity to Certain STDs
from Science Daily
Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial agent of sexually transmitted disease, accounting for more than a million reported infections in the United States each year. Researchers at the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have now designed a unique method for inducing immunity to the infection. More    E-mail article

Circumcision Removes Langerhans Cells Targeted by HIV
from Reuters Health via Medscape Today
Circumcision protects against HIV infection because the foreskin contains a high density of Langerhans cells, an established avenue of HIV infection, urologists reported here at the American Urological Association annual meeting. The finding comes from a study conducted at the Royal Victoria Hospital and the University of Melbourne, Australia. "Our aim was to determine the...Langerhans cell distribution of the remnant foreskin epithelium in circumcised adult men, and compare this to the epithelium of the inner foreskin and penile shaft," Dr. Sandra L. Hallamore noted. More    E-mail article




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