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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   May 06, 2014


New Application
Note:

Quantitative Analysis
of Dried Bloodspot
17-Hydroxy-
progesterone
with LC-MS/MS
for Clinical Research

 



Cancer researchers print living tumors via 3-D printer
redOrbit
A team of scientists led by Drexel University's Wei Sun has developed a method for 3-D printing living tumors — a development that could revolutionize cancer research. According to a report on the development recently published the journal Biofabrication, the team was able to print out viable tumors by using a mixture of cervical cancer cells and a hydrogel substance that looks like a common ointment.
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New studies: Young blood reverses effects of aging when put into older mice
The Washington Post
A trio of new studies has discovered that the blood of young mice appears to reverse some of the effects of aging when put into the circulatory systems of elderly mice. After combining the blood circulations of two mice by conjoining them — one old, the other young — researchers found dramatic improvements in the older mouse's muscle and brain.
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Coral reefs provide potent new anti-HIV proteins
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology via Science Codex
Researchers have discovered a new class of proteins capable of blocking the HIV virus from penetrating T-cells, raising hope that the proteins could be adapted for use in gels or sexual lubricants to provide a potent barrier against HIV infection. The proteins, called cnidarins, were found in a feathery coral collected in waters off Australia's northern coast. Researchers zeroed in on the proteins after screening thousands of natural product extracts in a biorepository maintained by the National Cancer Institute.
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An update on management of necrotizing soft-tissue infections
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Necrotizing soft-tissue infections, or NSTIs, are fulminant infections that lead to the death of subcutaneous tissues. Severe cases of infection are associated with the risk of mortality, limb loss or tissue loss. Diagnosis at an early stage is important to improve the survival rate. Antibiotic therapy, fluid correction, surgical debridement, wound care and organ support measures could reduce the mortality rate in NSTI. The benefits of novel therapies, such as hyperbaric oxygen and intravenous immunoglobulins, are being explored.
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Low-risk thyroid cancer doesn't need total thyroidectomy
Medscape Medical News
A new study from Japan lends support to the argument that most low-risk papillary thyroid cancer patients don't need a total thyroidectomy and will do just as well with more conservative surgery. Moreover, because there is no difference in survival, patients can be educated about the risks and benefits of both procedures and offered the choice, surgical resident Aya Ebina, M.D., from the division of head and neck, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, said.
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GW Online Programs In MLS

Fully Online Medical Laboratory Sciences Undergraduate and Graduate Degree and Certificate Programs
Earn ASCP MLS Certification through our BSHS or Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in MLS
New MSHS programs for 2014: MLS, Translational Microbiology, Molecular Diagnostic Sciences
Visit http://smhs.gwu.edu/crl/programs/mls for more information or contact the MLS program at mls@gwu.edu or 202-994-7732.
 


WHO: Spreading polio a global health emergency
NBC News
The spread of polio is an international health emergency that requires "extraordinary measures" to control it, the World Health Organization said. Three countries are spreading the virus to the rest of the world and need to act immediately to stop it, by vaccinating the population and vaccinating travelers, WHO said.
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Higher sleep efficiency in women with advanced breast cancer is associated with lower mortality
American Academy of Sleep Medicine via The Medical News
A new study reports that sleep efficiency, a ratio of time asleep to time spent in bed, is predictive of survival time for women with advanced breast cancer. Results show that higher sleep efficiency was significantly associated with lower mortality over the ensuing six years, an effect that remained after adjusting for baseline prognostic factors such as age, estrogen receptor status and treatments received.
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Researchers solve mystery of 1918 pandemic flu virus
University of Arizona via redOrbit
A study led by Michael Worobey at the University of Arizona provides the most conclusive answers yet to two of the world's foremost biomedical mysteries of the past century: the origin of the 1918 pandemic flu virus and its unusual severity, which resulted in a death toll of approximately 50 million people. Worobey's paper on the flu, for publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, not only sheds light on the devastating 1918 pandemic, but also suggests that the types of flu viruses to which people were exposed during childhood may predict how susceptible they are to future strains, which could inform vaccination strategies and pandemic prevention and preparedness.
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More STD screening on horizon for women?
HealthDay News
A federal task force is poised to advise doctors to regularly screen all sexually active American women and girls up to age 24 for the sexually transmitted diseases chlamydia and gonorrhea, which often don't have outward symptoms. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force hasn't made final decisions about the recommendations it will put forward to the nation's physicians. But the draft guidelines released recently represent a significant expansion of routine screening for STDs.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    BMI linked to breast cancer risk after menopause (Reuters)
Most hospital pregnancy tests found to be unreliable after first few weeks of pregnancy (American Association for Clinical Chemistry via Medical Xpress)
Cultured red blood cells: There's nothing artificial about it (By Rosemary Sparacio)
CDC: Measles cases at highest level in nearly 20 years (CNN)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Stem cell therapy 'could reduce death from heart disease'
Medical News Today
A new review published in The Cochrane Library suggests that stem cell therapy may be effective against heart disease. According to the research team, including Dr. Enca Martin-Rendon of the University of Oxford in the U.K., if stem cell therapy is used for at least one year in patients with heart disease, this could cut the number of deaths from the condition and reduce hospital readmissions.
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Study links discrepancies in data with reported success of stem cell treatment
HealthCanal
Researchers from Imperial College London conducted a meta-analysis of 49 randomized controlled trials of bone marrow stem cell therapy for heart disease. The study, published in the British Medical Journal, identified and listed over 600 discrepancies within the trial reports.
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WHO debates fate of smallpox vials in US, Russia
ABC News
The World Health Organization is set to vote on whether to destroy stockpiles of the smallpox virus in the only two countries that still have them — the United States and Russia. The frozen viruses went to the countries' top labs between 1979 and the early 1980s — the height of the cold war. Although WHO had just officially declared smallpox eradicated, a few samples of the frozen virus were still needed for research.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
Cancer researchers print living tumors via 3-D printer
redOrbit
A team of scientists led by Drexel University's Wei Sun has developed a method for 3-D printing living tumors — a development that could revolutionize cancer research. The team was able to print out viable tumors by using a mixture of cervical cancer cells and a hydrogel substance that looks like a common ointment.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
BMI linked to breast cancer risk after menopause
Reuters
Overall body size, rather than shape, is a better indicator of breast cancer risk after menopause, according to a recent study. The analysis of U.S. women contradicts past research suggesting that having an apple shape with a large midriff measurement, regardless of weight or body mass index, might signal greater breast cancer risk.

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This breast cancer scares patients, challenges doctors
The Indianapolis Star
When Tonya Trotter first felt a quarter-size knot in her breast, she didn't rush to get a mammogram. Over the next few months, the lump grew to the size of a tennis ball. Later she learned she had a type of breast cancer called "triple negative."

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Pain perception linked to genes
Medscape Medical News
A new study provides important new insights into gene-driven perceptions of pain. While the study won't have an immediate effect on treatment choices for chronic pain, it will help doctors understand why some patients feel more pain than others, said lead researcher, Tobore Onojighofia, M.D., MPH, clinical affairs manager, Proove Biosciences, Irvine, California.
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