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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   May 14, 2014


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Quantitative Analysis
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Is overprescribing really to blame for antibiotic resistance?
By Lauren Swan
The World Health Organization recently released a report regarding antimicrobial resistance and how it's being found in every part of the world. According to the WHO, the cause of this resistance is overuse and abuse of antibiotic medications, posing a potential threat for civilization as more diseases become drug resistant. However, antibiotics are only available with a prescription, and it's no secret they have become harder to receive in the past 10 years due to possibilities such as this. Yet more drug-resistant diseases have been popping up — whooping cough, gonorrhea and TB, just to name a few. Is overprescribing really at fault? Or are there other factors to consider?
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Ability to isolate, grow breast tissue stem cells could speed cancer research
Salk Institute via Science Codex
By carefully controlling the levels of two proteins, researchers at the Salk Institute have discovered how to keep mammary stem cells — those that can form breast tissue — alive and functioning in the lab. The new ability to propagate mammary stem cells is allowing them to study both breast development and the formation of breast cancers.
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Creatine kinase-MB: The journey to obsolescence
Medscape Medical News
A study was conducted to evaluate the clinical utility of and demand for the creatine kinase-MB assay. Researchers examined the number of CK-MB tests from 2007 through 2013 while they progressively deemphasized their use. They first removed CK-MB from the acute coronary syndrome panel and then from the main menu and observed the demand for the test. They also reviewed patient medical records to assess the appropriateness of its use.
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MERS surge: Many questions, few answers
MedPage Today
The explosion in cases of Middle East coronavirus in recent weeks raises a simple question: Why? Or more precisely, why now? After ticking along for nearly 2 years with about 15 cases of the respiratory disease a month, the number of cases started to climb dramatically in late March and early April.
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Antibiotic-resistant germs, lying in wait everywhere
The New York Times
The Lechuguilla Cave in New Mexico is a network of chambers stretching 1,600 feet underground. The bacteria that grow on the walls of its most remote recesses have been living in complete isolation for more than four million years. In 2010, Gerry Wright, a microbiologist at McMaster University in Ontario, ran an experiment on those long-lost bacteria. He and his colleagues doused them with antibiotics, the drugs that doctors have used for the past 70 years to wipe out bacterial infections. But many of the Lechuguilla bacteria would not die.
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Sofosbuvir/ribavirin effective for HCV genotypes 2 and 3
Medscape Medical News
The combination of sofosbuvir and ribavirin produces a sustained virologic response in patients with hepatitis C virus genotypes 2 and 3, a new study shows. Patients with HCV genotype 3 had markedly lower response rates if they had cirrhosis compared with those without cirrhosis.
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Syphilis makes a worrying comeback in US
NBC News
Syphilis is making a big comeback in the United States, with cases nearly doubling since 2005, federal health experts reported. More than 90 percent of cases are among men, mostly gay or bisexual men, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention team reported. Secrecy and a lack of follow-up are fueling the spread, the CDC team said.
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US cervical cancer rates higher than thought
HealthDay News
A new study finds that cervical cancer rates in the United States are much higher than previously reported, especially among women in their 60s and black women. For the new study, researchers excluded women who had had hysterectomies, because they were no longer at risk, and then concluded that the overall rate of cervical cancer was 18.6 cases per 100,000 women. They also found that the incidence rose steadily with age and peaked at ages 65-69.
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Researchers use DNA to build tool that may literally shine light on cancer
University of Montreal via Science Codex
Bioengineers at the University of Rome Tor Vergata and the University of Montreal have used DNA to develop a tool that detects and reacts to chemical changes caused by cancer cells and that may one day be used to deliver drugs to tumor cells.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DNA




TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    WHO: Spreading polio a global health emergency (NBC News)
Researchers solve mystery of 1918 pandemic flu virus (University of Arizona via redOrbit)
Cancer researchers print living tumors via 3-D printer (redOrbit)
Coral reefs provide potent new anti-HIV proteins (American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology via Science Codex)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Deadly illness in Nicaragua baffles experts
The New York Times
Across Central America, a painful disease that affects the kidneys has killed at least 20,000 people over the past decade and has become the leading cause of deaths in hospitals among men in El Salvador. But the illness, often called Chronic Kidney Disease of unknown causes, or CKDu, is so poorly understood that it still does not have a universally agreed upon name.
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Impressive new smartphone apps in health and medicine
By Rosemary Sparacio
Smartphones are just about everywhere. In the U.S. alone, more than 91 million Americans now use a smartphone. Of course, these devices are much more than just a phone. The fact that there are apps for many areas in personal health and medicine is a logical step to help individuals take better care of themselves and for researchers to find ways for individuals and physicians to do just that. For example, researchers have been studying an app for epilepsy and stroke care. Other studies are looking at an app for testing kidney damage, and one for diagnosing cataracts.
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Unlocking the secrets of suspended animation
Mosaic via CNN
Suspended animation, the ability to set a person's biological processes on hold, has long been a staple of science fiction. Interest in the field blossomed in the 1950s as a direct consequence of the space race. NASA poured money into biological research to see if humans might be placed in a state of artificial preservation.
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As baby boomers age, US older population to nearly double by 2050
United Press International
The U.S. population age 65 and older will double in size from 43.1 million in 2012 to 83.7 million in 2050, the U.S. Census Bureau said. Two reports released from the U.S. Census Bureau said the driving growth of the older population is due to aging baby boomers — those born from mid-1946 to mid-1964, who began turning 65 in 2011.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
Is overprescribing really to blame for antibiotic resistance?
By Lauren Swan
The World Health Organization recently released a report regarding antimicrobial resistance and how it's being found in every part of the world. According to the WHO, the cause of this resistance is overuse and abuse of antibiotic medications. Is overprescribing really at fault? Or are there other factors to consider?

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
WHO: Spreading polio a global health emergency
NBC News
The spread of polio is an international health emergency that requires "extraordinary measures" to control it, the World Health Organization said. Three countries are spreading the virus to the rest of the world and need to act immediately to stop it, by vaccinating the population and vaccinating travelers, WHO said.

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This breast cancer scares patients, challenges doctors
The Indianapolis Star
When Tonya Trotter first felt a quarter-size knot in her breast, she didn't rush to get a mammogram. Over the next few months, the lump grew to the size of a tennis ball. Later she learned she had a type of breast cancer called "triple negative."

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Conflicting advice on taking aspirin to prevent heart disease
The Boston Globe
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration set off a firestorm by calling into question a common practice: taking a baby aspirin a day to prevent heart disease. The agency first denied Bayer HealthCare's request recently to make the claim on its aspirin labels that the drug could be used to prevent a first heart attack in patients deemed by their doctors to be at high-risk of heart disease.
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