This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive  Media Kit

Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   May 27, 2014


New Application
Note:

Quantitative Analysis
of Dried Bloodspot
17-Hydroxy-
progesterone
with LC-MS/MS
for Clinical Research

 



Research: MRSA lives for a week on pockets in airplanes
The Washington Post
Researchers from Auburn University took two common, nasty bacteria and, in a lab, painted them on six surfaces that passengers routinely touch inside airplane cabins. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus lasted for 168 hours on the cloth seatback pockets where flyers store everything from magazines to iPhones.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Labs are told to start including a neglected variable: females
The New York Times
For decades, scientists have embarked on the long journey toward a medical breakthrough by first experimenting on laboratory animals. Mice or rats, pigs or dogs, they were usually male: Researchers avoided using female animals for fear that their reproductive cycles and hormone fluctuations would confound the results of delicately calibrated experiments.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Evaluating 'acquired immunity' may improve estimates of disease risk
Society for Risk Analysis via Infection Control Today
A new health study that accounts for "acquired immunity" when evaluating the risk of microbial illness from food or environmental exposures suggests that some current approaches may significantly overestimate their role in causing such illnesses. Immune status is a major factor in susceptibility to foodborne and environmental infectious diseases. By considering both the impact of acquired immunity to a pathogen and the amount of a pathogen to which people are exposed, researchers have developed a novel approach for more accurately assessing the potential health risks of infectious diseases.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Might pathologists soon have a test capable of predicting a patient's probability of death within 5 years?
Dark Daily
Will there be demand for a medical laboratory test that can help pathologists accurately predict the probability of death within five years for an individual? New research emerging from Europe suggests that such a diagnostic assay may be feasible. More remarkable, this clinical laboratory test may be as simple as testing for the concentration of four biomarkers in blood.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SHOWCASE
 
GW Online Programs In MLS

Fully Online Medical Laboratory Sciences Undergraduate and Graduate Degree and Certificate Programs
Earn ASCP MLS Certification through our BSHS or Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in MLS
New MSHS programs for 2014: MLS, Translational Microbiology, Molecular Diagnostic Sciences
Visit http://smhs.gwu.edu/crl/programs/mls for more information or contact the MLS program at mls@gwu.edu or 202-994-7732.
 


Hematuria overlooked as sign of bladder cancer in women
Medscape Medical News
Worse outcomes for women with bladder cancer than for men may be due in part to the under-recognition by general practice clinicians that hematuria — blood in the urine — is a likely sign of cancer, say the authors of a retrospective study. "Women are less likely than men to go undergo a complete, timely evaluation [for hematuria], and this might be relevant to women's more advanced stage of bladder cancer at diagnosis," said Daniel Barocas, M.D., MPH, assistant professor of urologic surgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Researchers grow functional nerve cells from skin
University of Cambridge via Laboratory Equipment
A new method of generating mature nerve cells from skin cells could greatly enhance understanding of neurodegenerative diseases, and could accelerate the development of new drugs and stem cell-based regenerative medicine. The nerve cells generated by this new method show the same functional characteristics as the mature cells found in the body, making them much better models for the study of age-related diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, and for the testing of new drugs.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Trust in Cleveland Clinic Laboratories
Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is a full-service, national reference lab dedicated to providing world class care. We have a dedicated staff of more than 1,300 employees, including board-certified subspecialty pathologists, PhDs, technologists, technicians, and support personnel. Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is proud to serve hospitals, outpatient facilities and physician offices worldwide. For more information, please visit clevelandcliniclabs.com.
 


Enterobacteriaceae bloodstream infections surpass S aureus
Medscape Medical News
Bloodstream infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae are more common than those caused by Staphylococcus aureus, but hospital stays are longer and mortality rates are higher with S aureus infection, new research shows. Around the world, Enterobacteriaceae resistance to cephalosporins is currently increasing, whereas methicillin resistance is in decline, said investigator Andrew Stewardson, M.D., from the infection control program at the University of Geneva.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword BLOODSTREAM


Molecular assay approved for blood compatibility testing
Medscape Medical News
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the Immucor PreciseType Human Erythrocyte Antigen Molecular BeadChip Test recently. The test is the first FDA-approved molecular assay used in transfusion medicine to help determine blood compatibility.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Tailored intervention does not up colorectral cancer screening rates
HealthDay News
An interactive multimedia computer program tailored to expanded health belief model sociopsychological factors is no more effective for encouraging colorectal cancer screening than a control nontailored informational program, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine. The researchers found that, compared with control patients, IMCP correlated with significantly greater colorectal cancer screening knowledge, self-efficacy, readiness, test preference specificity, discussion and recommendation, after adjustment for ethnicity/language, study center and the previsit value of the dependent variable.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Novel antigen holds promise for malaria vaccine
Medical News Today
In 2012, malaria was responsible for around 627,000 deaths worldwide, of which 460,000 occurred among African children under the age of 5 years. Now, researchers have identified a substance that they say could be a potential vaccine candidate for malaria.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  QC Soultions - Results you can Trust

Consolidate routine QC with Thermo Scientific MAS Omni Quality Control products eliminate up to 3 routinely run vials. Improve laboratory efficient with streamlining workflow and reducing costs.
 


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    'High-priority' chemicals that may cause breast cancer named (Medical News Today)
Dose of measles virus destroys woman's incurable cancer (Medical News Today)
Sepsis to blame for up to half of hospital deaths; early detection is key (Medical Daily)
African camels show MERS virus is more widespread than believed (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Study: Antibiotics speed resolution of middle ear effusion in AOM
Medscape Medical News
Results from a randomized, placebo-controlled study indicate that antimicrobial treatment of acute otitis media-related middle ear effusion is effective even in older children. In the Finnish study, of 84 children aged 6 months to 15 years, 50 percent of the patients were treated with antibiotics, with middle ear effusion resolving an average of 2 weeks earlier in these children than it did in patients who did not receive antibiotics.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
JoinYour Peers

AMT is designed for and led by lab professionals like you! Enhance your professional growth by joining our team (ASCP certficants don’t need further testing).

www.americanmedtech.org
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the ASCLS eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469-420-2629.
MORE


Alzheimer's and cerebral small-vessel disease interconnected
Medscape Medical News
The pathology of cerebral small-vessel disease and Alzheimer's disease appear to be interconnected, new research shows. Cerebral SVD "could provoke amyloid pathology while AD-associated cerebral amyloid pathology may lead to auxiliary vascular damage," Maartje I. Kester, M.D., Ph.D., from the VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and colleagues say.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Melanoma deaths linked to cancers that look like pimples
ABC News
Dermatologists say new research shows almost half of all melanoma deaths are from lumps that look like innocent pimples, rather than skin cancer. If nodules stay the same shape and size for a while, they are most likely harmless. If the lump comes up quickly, it is probably inflammatory like a pimple.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
Research: MRSA lives for a week on pockets in airplanes
The Washington Post
Researchers took two common, nasty bacteria and, in a lab, painted them on six surfaces that passengers routinely touch inside airplane cabins. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus lasted for 168 hours on the cloth seatback pockets where flyers store everything from magazines to iPhones.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
'High-priority' chemicals that may cause breast cancer named
Medical News Today
An estimated 12.4 percent of women born in the U.S. today will develop breast cancer at some point during their lives. Now, a new study has identified 17 "high-priority" chemicals women should avoid in order to reduce increased risk of breast cancer and demonstrates how their presence can be detected.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
WHO: Spreading polio a global health emergency
NBC News
The spread of polio is an international health emergency that requires "extraordinary measures" to control it, the World Health Organization said. Three countries are spreading the virus to the rest of the world and need to act immediately to stop it, by vaccinating the population and vaccinating travelers, WHO said.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


CT texture as new imaging biomarker in melanoma
Medscape Medical News
CT texture analysis can predict the survival of patients with metastatic melanoma who are receiving antiangiogenic therapy, a new study shows. "We're trying to find ways to predict how someone is going to do with metastatic melanoma early in their therapy," said Andrew D. Smith, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of nuclear medicine and body imaging at the University of Mississippi in Jackson.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 



ASCLS eNewsBytes

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Bob Kowalski, Content Editor, 469.420.2650   
Contribute news


This edition of the ASCLS eNewsBytes was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Join ASCLS and we will subscribe you -- it's free!

Recent issues

May 20, 2014
May 14, 2014
May 6, 2014
April 29, 2014






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063