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FDA OKs HPV DNA test for primary cervical cancer screening
Medscape
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved the cobas HPV test for primary cervical cancer screening in women aged 25 years or older. This is the first human papillomavirus DNA test approved in the U.S. that can be used alone to detect high-risk HPV.
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Report: Pancreatic cancer 2nd most deadly by 2030
CNN
By 2030, the top cancer killers in the U.S. will be lung, pancreas and liver, according to a new report published recently in the American Association for Cancer Research's journal. Researchers looked at trends in cancer incidence and death rates between 2006 and 2010, and used that data — combined with expected U.S. demographic changes — to predict numbers for 2030.
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CDC: Measles cases reach 20-year high in the United States
Reuters
Measles cases have hit a 20-year high in the U.S., a troubling increase fueled by international travel by people who have not been vaccinated against the virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Between Jan. 1 and May 23 of this year, 288 measles cases were reported to the federal health agency, the highest year-to-date total since 1994, officials said.
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ID update 2014: New threats, old antibiotics
Medscape
VideoBrief The major story of the year, which we have known was coming for a decade, is antibiotic resistance and fear of the inability to treat common infectious diseases that we currently see. Dr. John G. Bartlett, professor emeritus at Johns Hopkins University, provides an update on infectious disease.
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Sneaky bacteria change key protein's shape to escape detection
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Every once in a while in the U.S., bacterial meningitis seems to crop up out of nowhere, claiming a young life. Part of the disease's danger is the ability of the bacteria to evade the body's immune system, but scientists are now figuring out how the pathogen hides in plain sight. Their findings, which could help defeat these bacteria and others like it, appear in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
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Study: Children more likely than adults to be resistant to HIV medications
Tulane University via HealthDay News
Children born with HIV face a greater risk of developing resistance to life-saving antiretroviral drugs than HIV-infected adults do, according to new research. The study looked at 450 HIV-infected children across the U.S. and found that 74 percent were resistant to at least one type of HIV drug, and 30 percent were resistant to two classes of drugs. By comparison, the rates in HIV-infected adults were 36 percent and 12 percent, respectively.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword HIV




USPSTF shifts course, favors hepatitis B screening
Medscape
Persons at high risk for hepatitis B virus infection should be screened, according to a new recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Dr. Michael L. LeFevre and colleagues, on behalf of the USPSTF, published the recommendations online May 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
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Amber discovery indicates Lyme disease is older than human race
Oregon State University via Phys.org
Lyme disease is a stealthy, often misdiagnosed disease that was only recognized about 40 years ago, but new discoveries of ticks fossilized in amber show that the bacteria that cause it may have been lurking around for 15 million years — long before any humans walked on Earth. The findings were made by researchers from Oregon State University, who studied 15-20 million-year-old amber from the Dominican Republic that offer the oldest fossil evidence ever found of Borrelia, a type of spirochetelike bacteria that to this day causes Lyme disease.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Research: MRSA lives for a week on pockets in airplanes (The Washington Post)
Might pathologists soon have a test capable of predicting a patient's probability of death within 5 years? (Dark Daily)
Novel antigen holds promise for malaria vaccine (Medical News Today)
Molecular assay approved for blood compatibility testing (Medscape Medical News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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CDC: False alarm on MERS transmission
Medscape
An Illinois man once thought to have been infected with the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus after he was exposed to an infected business associate never had the virus after all, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. On May 17, the CDC announced that the Illinois man had tested negative for an active infection by way of a polymerase chain reaction assay.
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CDC launches new website addressing sepsis
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via Infection Control Today
Sepsis is a consequence of infection that is difficult to predict, diagnose and treat. Patients who develop sepsis have an increased risk of complications and death and face higher healthcare costs and longer treatment.
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For the 1st time in the lab, researchers see stem cells take key step toward development
Nature Communications via Phys.org
The gap between stem cell research and regenerative medicine just became a lot narrower, thanks to a new technique that coaxes stem cells, with potential to become any tissue type, to take the first step to specialization. It is the first time this critical step has been demonstrated in a laboratory.
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MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
FDA OKs HPV DNA test for primary cervical cancer screening
Medscape
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved the cobas HPV test for primary cervical cancer screening in women aged 25 years or older. This is the first human papillomavirus DNA test approved in the U.S. that can be used alone to detect high-risk HPV.

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read more
Research: MRSA lives for a week on pockets in airplanes
The Washington Post
Researchers from Auburn University took two common, nasty bacteria and, in a lab, painted them on six surfaces that passengers routinely touch inside airplane cabins. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus lasted for 168 hours on the cloth seatback pockets where fliers store everything from magazines to iPhones.

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'High-priority' chemicals that may cause breast cancer named
Medical News Today
An estimated 12.4 percent of women born in the U.S. today will develop breast cancer at some point during their lives. Now, a new study has identified 17 "high-priority" chemicals women should avoid in order to reduce increased risk of breast cancer and demonstrates how their presence can be detected.

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Cervical cancer screening: Doctors unconvinced on HPV DNA test
Medscape
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved the use of a HPV test as a primary cervical cancer screening test in women as young as 25 years, yet physicians are unlikely to ditch the Papanicolaou test soon, experts say. If the cobas test is used as a primary screen, those who test positive for HPV 16 or HPV 18 are supposed to have a colposcopy, according to the FDA. If they test positive for one of the other high-risk HPV types, they are supposed to have a Pap test to determine whether they need colposcopy.
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Scientists urge study of environmental factors that may speed aging
National Geographic
A trio of scientists from the University of North Carolina argue in a new paper that more work needs to be done on "gerontogens" — factors, including substances in the environment, that can accelerate the aging process. Possible gerontogens include arsenic in groundwater, benzene in industrial emissions, ultraviolet radiation in sunlight and the cocktail of 4,000 toxic chemicals in tobacco smoke. Activities may also be included, like ingesting excessive calories, or suffering psychological stress.
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